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REPORTS OF PROCEEDINGS 



O F T II F. 



CITY COUNCIL OF BOSTON. 



FOE THE MUNICIPAL YEAE 1878, 



Commencing Monday, January 7th, 1878, and ending Monday, 

January 6th, 1879. 



BEING REPRINTS OF REPORTS AS PUBLISHED BY CONTRACT IN THE "BOSTON 

EVENING TRANSCRIPT." 



Tenth Annual Volume. 




BOSTON: 

PRESS OF ROCKWELL & CHURCHILL, CITY PRINTERS. 

fREPRLNTS OF REPORTS FROM THE TRANSCRIPT PRESS.) 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE. 



This Index is prepared in accordance with a vote of the 
Committee on Printing. 

The following topics are omitted, as not essential, or as 
bettor classified for reference in Department offices: — 

Petitions received and referred. See City Clerk. 

Orders of notice, and hearings, unless subjects of discussion. 

See City Clerk. 
Police Ofiicors and Special Police. See Police Department. 
Truant Officers. Sec School Dopartmont. 
Conventions with School Committee. See City Clerk. 
Jurors. See City Clerk. 
Constables' Bonds. Soe City Clerk. 
Streets — damages, and betterments assessed and abated. Soo 

Street Commissioners and Supt. Streets. 
Streets — temporary closing, removal of obstructions, paving 

in front of estates. See Supt. Streets. 



Sowers — assessments made, abated, and postponed. See 
Sower Department. 

I! uildings — permits authorized. See Inspector of Buildings. 

Public Buildings — use of granted. See Supt. Public Build- 
ings 

Extensions of time for building. See Supt. Public Lands. 

Taxes — assessed and abated. See Assessors. 

Claims — allowed, and leave to withdraw, unless subjects of 
discussion. See Clerk of Committees. 

Leases. Seo Auditor of Accounts. 

Licenses to Auctioneers, Undertakers, Victuallers, Innholders, 
Pawnbrokers, Junk Collectors, Newsboys, Bootblaoks, 
' and for Steam Engines and Boilers, Hoisting Beams, 
Cellars below grado, Storage of Petroleum, Stables, Car- 
riages, Wagons, Intelligonco Offices, sale of Second-hand 
Articles, Billiard Halls, Projecting Signs and Lanterns, 
Exhibitions, etc. Seo City Clerk. 



I N" D B X . 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT. 

January 7th, 1878. 

Prayer by Rev. Henry W. Foote, 1 

Oath of office administered to Hon. Henry L. Pierce, Mayor-elect, 
by Hon. Horace Gray, Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial 
Court, 1 

Oaths of office administered by Mayor to members-elect of each 
branch of City Council, 1 

Delivery of Mayor's Inaugural Address, 1 

Samuel F. McCleary elected City Clerk, 3 ; Oath of office admin- 
istered by Mayor, 3 

ORGANIZATION AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN. 

Board called to order by City Clerk, 1 
Solomon B. Stebbins elected chairman, 1 
Notice to Common Council of organization, 1 
Mondays, 4 P.M., assigned for regular meetings, 1 

ORGANIZATION AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF COMMON 
COUNCIL. 

Called to order by senior member, Benjamin Pope, 1 

Credentials of members received, and quorum roported, 1 

Notice to Mayor and Aldermen, of quorum present, 1 

Benjamin Pope elected President, 1 

Address of President, 1 

■Washington P. Gregg elected Clerk, 2 

Oath of office administered to Clerk by City Solicitor, 2 

Notice to Board of Aldermen of organization, 2 

Thursday evenings, half-past 7, assigned for regular meetings, 2 

ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN AND COMMON COUNCIL. 

[Preceding the figures indicating page, a signifies Aldermen, c 

Common Council.] 
Appropriations — 

Annual — see heading Auditor of Accounts, item Estimates 

$9,000 additional for sewers, a 20, 28, c 45 

$359.17 for Quarantine Department, c 45, a 53 

$25,000 for Back Bay Park, c 46, a 54, c 75 

$16,000 for land, Back Bay Park, c 64, a 85 

$44,325 for school instructors, c 105, 120, 156, a 168 

$7,125 for salaries of officers of School Committee, c 105, 120, 156, 

a 168 
Unexpended balances, order referred, c 125, a 126: report, c 

775, a 780 
Balances of special appropriations, order of inquiry, c 315 ; 

report, c 456 
$2,000 for " Park Nursery, Austin Farm " — see Public Parks 
$3,700 for registration of voters and election expenses, a 604, c 

$4,000 for fitting up May hew Schoolhouse, a 601, c 612 
$2,000 for Collector's Department, a 638, c 663, 067 
$4,000 for Northampton-street District, a 675, c 684 
$1,800 for Law Department, a 675, c 684 
$15,000 for Sewer Department, a 712, c 773 
$59,271.90 for laying out East Chester Park, c 773, 776 
Armories — see Militia 
Assessors — 

Classification of voters, c 35; referred, o 93, a 96; report, a 

169, c 172 * 

Appointment of second assistants by principal assessors, 

expediency referred, a 38, c 42, 62, a 68 ; report, c 89, a 95 
Abolishing Second Assistant Assessors, a 10, c 12, a 38, c 42 89 
Auditor of Accounts — 

Monthly Exhibits, Jan., 4; Feb., 45; March, 105; April, 183; 

May, 290, June, 357; July, 446; Aug., 490; Sept., 513; 

Oct., 565; Nov., 604; Dec, 667 
Estimates for 1878-79, referred, c 98, a 109 ; report, c 132, 157 ; 

orders passed, c 172, 188, a 195 
Authorized to make closing transfers, c 105, 156, a 168 
Order to print annnal report, a 290, c 291 
Statement of Leases of City Property, a 304 
Annual report, c. 414, a 427 
Payment of $4 to Mrs. Harrington, a 485 



Badges — 

Order indefinitely postponed, c 6 
Baggage — 

Unclaimed, Boston & Albany Railroad, a 425 
Ballast Lighters — 

Quarterly report, a 10, 168, 427, 556 
Barnard, Ward 24 — remarks : 

Finance Committee, 6 

Joint rules and orders, 14 

Second Assistant Assessors, 42 

Accounts of Water Board, 74 

Sale and purchase of ferry boats, 87 

Police Belts, 91 

Public Baths, 105 

Management of public grounds, 108 

Superintendents of Bridges, 153 

Appropriation Bill, 162 

School-house, Allston District, 182 

Requiring employes to be residents, 261 

Chain-cable factory, 296 

Additional water appropriation, 298 

Fourth of July, 313 

Premiums on loans, 317 

Decoration Day, 329 

Fourth of July, 335 

Music on Common, 376, 476 

South Boston Branch Library, 393 

Painting office of Sup't Common, 523 

East Boston Ferries, legal fees, 577 

Back fees to Deputy Collectors, 614 

Dissection of dead bodies. 618 

Voting precincts in Wards 23, 24, and 25, 620 

Annual dinner, 747 

Barry, Ward 22 — remarks : — 
Finance Committee, 6 
Joint rules and orders, 13, 14 
Classification of voters, 35 
Superintendent of Public Grounds, 61 
Police Commission, 64, 80, 331 
Work on Back Bay Park, 93, 123, 166 
Salaries of employes of public institutions, 107 
Management of public grounds, 119, 122 
Police Belts, 122 

Mass. Char. Mech. Exhibition, 142 
Loan for Park purposes, 139 
Manufacture of chain cables, 155, 212 
Harbor Master, 157 
Appropriation Bill, 160 
School-house, Allston District, 182 
[Errata, 182] 

Employes on public grounds, 217, 222, 226 
Additional Water Supply appropriations, 225, 280 
Employes on New Park, 226 
Personal explanation, 247, 248 
Duty of Fire Commissioners, 285 
Special election in Ward 10, 300 
Alterations of the records, 302, 311 
Horatio Harris estate for park, 311 
Director of East Boston Ferries, 313 
South Boston Branch Library, 393 
Proposed abolition of certain commissions, 396 
Police Commissioners, 408, 455, 457 
Ball ground on Common, 444 
Premium on loans, 443 

Right of visit to Public Institutions, 544, 693 
Strike at Grand Junction Wharf, 773 
Pensioned policemen, 775 
Plants for Public Grounds, 777 

Bonds of city officers — 

Supt. of Printing, a 85 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, a 208 

Harbor Master, a 398 

Auditor of Accounts, a 604 

Collector of Taxes, 604 

Report of Committee to examine, a 758 
Boston, Revere Beach, and Lynn Railroad — 

William Evans, damage assessed, a 128 



IV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Brawley, Ward 19 — remarks : 
Joint rules and orders, 14 
Free soup, 24 
Public Baths, 35 
Classification of voters, 36 
Contracts involving employment of labor, 44 
Superintendent of Public Grounds, 60 
Accounts of Water Board, 74 
Police Commission, 70, 330 
Work on Back Hay Park, 93, 124 
Management of public grounds, 108, 120, 219 
Appropriation for public instruction, 121 
Manufacture of chain cabled, 156, 181 
Appropriation Bill, 101 
Army and Navy Memorial, 166, 174 
Fire Commissioner, 172 



[Errata, 162] 
1 W; 
297 



Additional Water Supply appropriations, 187, 224,220, 201, 277, 



Employes on public grounds, 222 
Requiring employes to be residents, 239, 260 
trustee of City Hospital, 277,309 
Alterations of the records. 302, 311 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 309, 351, 370 

Premiums on loans, 316 

Visit to Sudbury river, 309, 379 

Police Commissioners, 410, 457, 470 

Playgrounds, 412 

Duties of Commissioners, 441 

Fourth of July regatta, 468 

Right of visit to Public Institutions, 544 

Liquor Li< snses, 662 

Committee on Police Dep't, 577 

Public Institutions, investigation, 580 

Free sale of lager beer and eider, 596 

Water Supply for Bast Boston, 019 

Voting precincts in Wards 28, 24. and 25, 019, 685 
Street Commissioners, ''.:;o, 074 
Stony Brook. 

Transfer of Insane, 744, 771 
Annual dinner, 740 
Director for Public Institutions, 706 
Bridges — 

Keports of Superintendents, a 10 

Annual Repi it of Commissioner, a 18 

Mystic Valley Railroad, a 21 

Cambridge Bridges, order passed to petition, a 71, c 73 

Cambridge St., Bri| 00 for repairs a, 97 

Maiden, #1,000 for repairs, a 97 ; closed, a 251 

Mt. Washington-ave. Bridge, closed for repairs, a 197 

Bhavrmut 300 for repairs, a 262 

Assessments for displacement of tide- water, referred, a 272 

Broadway, $11,000 for repairs, a 34:S 

Dart. 576,000 for rebuilding, a 305 ; agreements 

with Boston and Providence and Boston and Albany It. 11. 

Co.'s authorized, a 182, c 510, 512 ; a 617, 548 
Berkeley - r repairs, a 482 

Newton' street, $3,400 for repairs, a 402 
Broadway, closed for repairs, a 491 
\\ est Chester Tark, repairs, a 531, 548 
Essex street, $4,5110 for repairs, and closed, 593 
Con olosed for examination, a 682 

Warren Bridge, lease to bonis Poletti, a 082, o 684 
Albany - ' • fill Boxbury Canal, a 723, a 728 

East (luster Park, order authorizing construction, a 758, C 

772, 776 
Brintnall, Ward 5 — remarks : 
Nuisance town, 30 

Police Belts, 91. 122 

Pay of laborers, 91 

Chain-cable Factory at House of Correction, 181, 293 

Removal of House of Correction, 248 

Proposed purchase of Bong Island, 310 

Salaries of I olice Commissioners, 370 

Police s, 408 

ion, 422 

Boxbury Canal, 440, 453 

Playgrounds, 442 

Summer concerts, 473 

Liqu. . 502 

East Chester Park, 630 

Lease of finding un Warren-st. Bridge, 684 

Repeal of cle -nets, 695, 747 

Bromley, Ward 19— remarks: 

Pensioned policemen, 74S 
Brown, Ward 23 — remark 

Stony Brook, 125, 003, 067, 687 

Appropriation Bill, 104 

Interest to be charged upon tax, 190 

Seventeenth of June, 308 

Ungraded streets, 369 

Music on Common, 377 

Bight of visit to Public Institutions, 542 

Voting precincts, Wards 23, 24, and 25, 635 

Street Commissioners, 672 

Transfer of Insane, 738, 767 
Buildings — see also Public Buildings. 

Annual report of Inspector, c 88 



Building Limits, ordinance to amend, a 147, 108, c 172 
Leave to move wooden buildings discussed, a 229 
Permits authorized during vacation, a 428, c 432 
Semi-annual report of Inspector, a 405 
Burke, Ward 2 — remarks : 
Badges, 7 

Second Assistant Assessors, 42 
Contracts involving employment of labor, 42, 329 
Police Commission, 57, 75, 329 
Superintendent of Public Grounds, 61, 186 
Sale and purchase of ferry-boats, S7 
Mass. Char. Mech. Exhibition, 103, 140, 176 
Public Baths, 106 

Salaries of employes in public institutions, 107 
Management of public grounds, 108, 218 

Harbor Master, 156, 228 

Appropriation Bill, 101 

Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 210, 296 

Director of Bast Boston Ferries, 291, 312 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 308, 372, 457 

Premiums on loans, 316 

Fourth Of July, 886 

Proposed \i-it to Sudbury river, 352 

Harbor Police, 

Polico Commissioners, 408, 407 

Boxbury Canal, 452 

Fourth of July regatta, 458 

Summer concerts, 476 

Back fees to Deputy Collectors, 614 

East Chester Park, 

Street Commissioners, 037 

Boston Ferries, legal fees, G64 
Public Institutions, investigation, 094 
Non-resident employes. 705,745 
Transfer of the Insane, 772 

Cambridge Railroad — 

Hearing on running to Summer St., a 47 ; report, 128, 149 
Cannon, Ward 7 — remarks : 

Police Belts, 122 
Cemeteries — 

Cedar drove, annual report, a 304, 326 
Mt. Hope, annual report, a 361 

authorizing purchase of land referred, a295, c 277; author- 
ized, c 450, a 460 
Pbipps-strcet burying-ground, petition referred to Board of 
Health, a 462, c 407; report, referred to Committee on 
Sewers, a 487; report, a 526 
City Clerk — 

Quarterly report, a 53, 274, 490, 601 
City Council — 

Terms of office and salaries, c 15, 91 

Expediency of regulating carriage-hire referred, c 16, a 17 
Official report of proceedings authorized, e 816, a 338 
Alterations of the records, order indefinitely postponed, c 302 ; 
reconsidered and referred, e 312, a 318 ; report, 443, a 440 
City Documents — 

To be sent to members City Council as issued, c 6, a 8 
Index to documents on files, c 5, a 8 
City Employes — see City laborers 
City Engineer — 

Authorized to purchase supplies, etc., a 20, c 31 
Annual report, a 09 
Visit to Europe extended, a 21, c 22 
City Hospital — 

Annual report of Trustees, a 529 [c 595 

Reimbursement from State, for care of poor, referred, a 590, 
City laborers — 

Petition for hearing referred, a 10 

Residence of employes referred, c 25, a 20 ; report, c 105 ; ordi- 
nance rejected, 239: reconsideration, c 260, a 273, c 667, 
690,708, 710,744, 750, 754, a 759 
Expediency of repealing ordinance referred, a 39, c 42 ; report, 
c 220 : recommitted, order for retention of money referred, 
a 227, c 238 ; report, a 275, c 277 
Petition for aid by laborers, referred, c 45 
Paying semi-monthly referred, c 91, a 95 ; report, c 182, a 183 
Expediency of providing work for poor citizens referred, c 6; 

report, order referred and order passed, c 34, a 37 
Claims of West Boxbury laborers — sec Claims. 
Method of employing labor — sec Common. 
Improved Sewerage, non-residents, c 815, a 320, 345, c 351, a 

307, 429 
Wages of 6treet laborers, order referred, c 619 
Pay of laborers before Thanksgiving, a 047, c 663, 664 
Pay of laborers before Christmas, c 695, a 696 
City Messenger — 

$48.15 for extra service, a 759, c 765 
City officers (elected or appointed) — 
City Clerk, 3 
Mayor's Clerk, a 10, 425 
Assistant City Clerk, a 1 

Trustees Mt. Hope Cemeterv, a 17, c 22, a 198, c 238, a 251 
Trustees City Hospital, a 1/, c 22, a 198, c 238, a 251, c 258, 
a 273, c 277, a 287, c 291, a 303, 307, c 309, 310, a 320, c 828, 
a 338, 363, c 369, 407, a 427 
Directors Public Institutions, a 17, c 22, a 203, c 238, 248, 249, 
259, a 273, c 277, a 287, 307, 345, o 453, 749, a 764, c. 766 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITT COUNCIL. 



Directors East Boston Ferries, a 17, c 22, a 128, c 135, a 146, 

c 152, a 168, c 172, a 183, c 187, a 194, c 210, a 227, c 238, a 251, 

a 290, c 291, 302, a 303, c 310, a 320, c 329, a 338, c 351, 389, 

a 398 
Trustees Public Library, a 17, c 22, a 127, c 135, 246, a 251, c 258 
Weighers of Coal, a 17, 37, 67, 81, 126, 145, 167. 183, 194, 272, 

287, 397, 460, 479, 490, 621 
City Messenger, a 3S, c 44 
Superintendent Public Buildings, a 38, c 44 
Assessors, a 38, c 44 
Superintendent of Streets, a 55, c 57 
City Engineer, a 37, c 44 | 
Superintendent Public Lands, a 38,"c 44 
Superintendent Sewers, a 38, c 44 
City Solicitor, a 37, c 44 
Clerk of Committees, a 37, c 44 
Superintendent Public Grounds, a 58. c 74, a 114, 130, c 135, 

a 146 
Water Registrar, a 38, c 44 
City Surveyor, a 37, c 44 

Overseers of Poor, a 85, c 87, a 184, c 187, a 568, 575, 038, 663 
Measurers of Grain, a 47 
Undertakers, a 17, 67, 81, 227, 303, 525 
Supt. of Wagons, a 47 
Supt. of Hacks and Carriages, a 47 
Supt. of Intelligence Offices, a 47 
Supt. of Pawnbrokers, a 47 
Supt. of. Faneuil Hall Market, a 47 
Inspectors of Provisions, a 67, 95, 97 
Supt. of Faneuil Hall, a 67, 97 
Supt. of Printing, a 67, c 73 
Supts. of Bridges, a 85, c 122, a 127, c 137, 152 
City Registrar, a 37, c 44 

Commissioner Cedar Grove Cemetery, a 37, c 44 
City Architect, a 38, c 44 
First Assistant Assessors, a 69, c 74, 91 
Inspector of Milk, a 47 
Registrar of Voters, a 47 
Superintendent of Lamps, a 37 
Commissioner of Bridges, a 97, c 104, a 109 
Second Assistant Assessors, a 95, c 104, a 110, c 116. a 127, c 135, 

246, a 251, c 258 
Measurers of Wood and Bark, a 109, 145, 167, 490, 528 
Weighers and Inspectors of Bundle Hay, a 109, 126, 490 
Surveyors of Marble, a 109 
Inspectors of Petroleum and Coal Oil, a 109, 126 
Superintendents of Hay Scales, a 109, 126 
Member of Board of Health, a 145, 152 
Ere Commissioner, a 144, c 152, a 167, 168, c 172 
Measurers of Upper Leather, a 167 
Public AVeighers, 167, 183, 250, 287, 380, 397, 564, 750 
Assistant Clerk of Committees, a 168, c 172 
Assistant City Messengers, a 168, c 172 

Member of Boston Water Board, a 167, 186, 250, 254, c 258, 282 
Pence Viewers, a 169, c 172 
Field Drivers and Pound Keepers, a 169, c 172, a 208, c 213, 

a 398, c 407, a 488, c 520 
Inspector of Lime, a 169, c 172, a 485 
Culler of Hoops and Staves, a 169, c 172 
Park Commissioner, a 183, c 187 
Sealers of Weights and Measures, a 183 
Inspectors of Lighters, a 194, c 210 
Superintendent Licenses, a 205 
Truant Officers, a 205 
Sinking Fund Commissioner, a 261, c 258 
Inspectors of Elections, a 303 
City Treasurer, a 342, c 370 
Auditor of Accounts, a 342, c 370 
Collector of Taxes, a 363, c 389 
Police Commissioners, a 380, a 405, c 408 
Harbor Master, a 380 
Precinct officers — see Elections 
Officer to take charge of neglected children, a 582 
Street Commissioner, a 753, c 765 
City Physician — 

Leave of Absence, a 713, c 737 
City Registrar — 

Annual report, c 45, a 338 
Permits for burials, orders referred, a 237, e 238 
City Scales — 

Quarterly report North Scales, a 10, 273, 500 
City Solicitor — see Law Department 
City Supplies — 

Purchases, orders referred, c 192, a 194 ; report, c 226 ; ordinance 

passed, a 250 
City Surveyor — 

Annual report, a 28 

Authorized to purchase supplies, etc., a 20, c 3 
Claims — 

Payments of executions or judgments of courts authorized, a 11 , 

c XA 
Payment of sundry bills authorized : — 

$8.50, P. II. Rogers, c 34, 45, a 53 

.¥2.30, Hall & Whipple, c 89, 104, a 109 

$115.88, Heliotype Printing Co., c 89. 104, a 109 

$00, F. L. Gilman & Co., c 89, 104, a 109 

$34.50 George J. Coyle, c 89, 104, a 109 

$143.88, H. A. Winship, a 185, 203, c 238 



$2,132.27, to Mary W. Wyman — see Public Buildings. 

$9.30 to Hall fc Whipple, a 518, c 523 

$4.00 to Mrs. Harrington, c 523 

$48 to Abina Gilmartin, a 731, c 744 
Francis-st. schoolhouse, $1,626 to S. H. Tarbell, a 730, c 773, 

776 
Back pay for deputy collectors, report, c 596 ; order passed, c 

612, 619, a 621, 645, c 695, a 696 
West Roxbury laborers, a 130, 186, c 187, 301, 311, a 319. c 329. 

352, a 357 
Clapp, Ward 14 — remarks : 

Mass. Charitable Mechanic Exhibition, 144 
Coe, Ward 23 — remarks : 
Joint rules and orders, 13 
Mass. Char. Mech. Exhibition, 103, 142 
Appropriation for public instruction, 121 
Work on Back Bay Park, 124, 166 
Superintendents of Bridges, 137, 153 
Appropriation Bill, 160 
Roxbury Canal, 164 

Additional Water Supply appropriation, 225 
Requiring employes to be residents, 245 
Claims of West Roxbury laborers, 302, 353 
Alterations of the Records. 302 
Proposed purchase of Long Island, 310 
Sewer and sidewalk assessments, 314 
Premiums on loans, 317 
Police Commission, 329, 375 
Summer vacation, 422 
Salaries of Police Commissioners, 457 
New Court-House, 540 
Brighton Grammar school-house, 538 
East Boston Ferries, legal fees, 576 
Committee on Police Dep't, 577 
Voting precincts in Wards 23, 24, and 25, 619. 635 
East Chester Park, 631 
Lease of building on Warren-st. Bridge, 684 
Stony Brook, 688 
Non-resident employes, 710 
Annual dinner, 746 
Pensioned policemen, 774 
Colby, Ward 18 — remarks: 
Police Commission, 59 
Superintendent of Public Grounds, 136 
Mass. Char. Mech. Exhibition, 142, 175 
Chain-cable factory at House Correction, 212 
Requiring employes to be residents, 244 
Director of East Boston Ferries, 312 
Huntington avenue, 328 
Claims of West Roxbury laborers, 352 
South Boston Branch Library, 392 
Powers of Police Commissioners, 468 
Stony Brook, 663, 674, 686 
Non-resident employes, 7.08 
Collector's Department — 

Extra clerk-hire authorized, c 25, 31, a 87 

Annual report of Collector, referred, c 300, a 303 ; report, c 

378, a 384 
Additional clerk in office of Water Registrar, c 302, 311. a 319 
$2,000 additional appropriation, a 604, c 612, a 622, 638, c 663, 

667 
Back pay for Deputy Collectors — see Claims. 
$400 to clerks, for extra services, c 703, a 711 
$20 for posting estates, c 703, a 711 
Committees — 

Order for appointment of Joint Special Committees to nominate 

candidates for city offices, c 7, a 8 
Committee on Finance elected, c 12 ; organized, c 23 
Committee on Accounts elected, a 1, c 5 ; organized, a 10 
Standing Committee on Elections, c 2 
Joint Standing Committees, c 7, a 8, c 16, a 55, c 191, 258, a 336 

c 581, a 582 
Standing Committees of Board of Aldermeu, a 8 
Standing Committees of Common Council, c 7 
Special Committees appointed — 

State Aid, c 2, 7, a 8 

Rules and orders Board of Aldermen, 1 

Joint rules and orders, a 1, c 2 

Disposal of topics in Mayor's Address, c 2, a 8 

Nominating committees appointed, c 3, 7, a 8, 80, 97 

Rules and orders of Common Council, 2 

Public parks, c 3, 7, a 8 

Improved sewerage, c 3, 7, a 8 

Franklin Fund, a 29 

Inspection of Prisons, a 85 

Mercantile Wharf Market, a 70, c 73, 88 

Stony -brook Improvement, c 3. 7, a 8 

Petition from Mass. Char. Mech. Assoc, a 55, c 57 

Work for destitute citizens, c 6, a 8 

Consolidation of harbor steam facilities, c 26, 26 

Auditor's Estimates, a 109 

Seventeenth of June, c 156, a 168 

Chain-cable Factory, bribery charges, c 213. n 227 

Report of Commissioners on Treatment of Poor, a 272, c 277 

Funeral of Alderman Perkins. 270 

Conference election of Ferry Directors, c 302, a 320 

Labor on improved sewerage, e 315, 316 

Election returns, a 325, a 601. 682 



VI 



IXDEX TO PKOCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Fourth of July, c335, a 338 

Conference, Trustee City Hospital, o 328, a 338 

Investigation of Ferry Department, a 312, o 351 

To examine Bonds, a 344, c 351 

Franklin Fund, a 

Dissection of dead bodies of poor, e 017 
Nominations by special Committees — 

Committee on Accounts, c 5 

Finance Committee, c 6, 12 

Trustees Mi. Hope, o 14, a 17, 197 

Trustees City Bospital.c 1), a 17, 197, o BIS, a 251, 398 

Directors for Public Institutions, c 11, a 17, 185 

Directors Bast Boston Ferries, c 1 1, a 17, J2". o 350 

Trustees Public library, c 14, a 17, <• 125, a 127,251 
sors, e 33 

City Solicitor, c 32 

Superintendent of Sewers, c 32 

Clerk of Committees, c 88 

City Engineer, 

Superintendent of Public Grounds, 

Superintendent of Public Lands, c 32 

Water Registrar, c 38 

City Surveyor, c 32 

Superintendent of streets, c 32, a 56 

City Messenger, c B8 

Superintendent of Public Buildings, c 82 

Overseers of Poor, a 85, 184, 534, -17, e 501, a 508, c 030, 
a 038 

Superintendents of Bridges, a 85 

First Assistant assessors, c 04 

City Architect, c 32 

Commissioner Cedes Grove Cemetery, c 33 

City Registrar, c 33 

Second Assistant Assessors, c 89, 251 

Sinking Fund Commissioner, a 251 

Inspectors of Lighters, c 192 

City Treasurer, a 342 

Auditor of Accounts, a 342 

City Collector of Taxes, a 1168 
Common Council — 

Annual dinner, 703, 740, 749 
Common ami Public Grounds — 

Land on Dartmouth and Boylston streets, committee authorized 

to confer, a 7", o 73 
Placing public grounds in earo of Park Commissioners, a 70, 

85, c B7, 89, e 107, c 116, 122 
Boats on Public-l larden pond, a 96, 103 
Play-ground on Common, order referred, c 182, a 183, 443, c 444, 

459 
Superintendent authorized to purchase supplies, and employ 

men, a 202, c 238 
Method of hiring employee, a 202, 205, c 217, 222 ; investigation 

refused, o 226 : indefinite postponement, c 703 
Loan for Public Grounds, -47 
Temporary building at deer park, a 254, c 282, a 488 
Dartmouth-street -quale, report, a 3S5, c 389 
Army and Navy Monument, £3,600 for fencing and grading, a 

388, c 421 
Free concerts, a 318, c 352, 376, 390, 396, a 397, c 456, 459, a 

460, c 476, 478, a 168 
Playgrounds, o 286, a 287, e 389 a 398, c 421, 441 
Statue of Charles Sumner, a 429 
Painting office of Sup't, c 622 

Expediency of commencing Superintendent's term March 1, 
referred, a 548, c 501 ; report, ordinance passed, a 570, 
e 595 
Plants, contract for 1879, a 642; c 684, a 696; a 758, 764, c 706, 770 
Skating on Public Garden pond, referred to next City Govern- 
ment, c 777, a 780 
Contingent Expenses — 

Of Hoard of Aldermen : approval of bills authorized, 11, 485 
Of Common Council : approval of bills authorized, 15, 182 
Constables— see County of Suffolk. 
County of Suffolk — 

Repairs and furniture for county buildings authorized, a 20 
Constables apj ointed, a 20, 47, 272, £03,380, 400, 547, 504, 591, 

038, 075 
Probation officer appointed, a 318 

Jail expenses: for Jan., 28; Feb., 85; March, 140 ; April, 251; 
May, 821 I -June, 398; Julv, 485; Aug., 5U0; Sept., 517. 
Oct., 692; Nov., 041: Dec., 712 
Court House, communication from Mayor referred, a 49 ; re- 
port, a 111, 187 
Salaries of officers attending courts, order passed to petition, 

a 72; referred, c 73, a 85 
Jury List, a 110, 126, 148, 711 
Indices for attachments on Real Estate, a 128, 146 
Court House, Baptist Church site referred, a 180 
$10,000 for new boiler-house at Jail, a 360, c 309 
Inspection of Prisons, reports, a 462, 780 
Registry of Deeds, $4,400 for indexes, a 486 
Probation officer appointed, a 6S2 
Ponds of Register and Assistant Register of Deeds approved, 

a 502 
New Court-House, a 507, 513, 513, 534, c 508, a 546, 642, 676, 

71.-, 73:;, e 770 
Steam Railroad Locations, binding plans, a 533 
$1,000 to Social Law Library, a 052 



Crocker, Ward 9 — n marks : 
Etoxbur) Canal, 12 

Joint rules and orders, 12, 14 

Superintendent of Printing, 31 

Public Baths, 35, 106 

Second Assistant Assessors, 42 

Contracts involving employment of labor, 12, 238 

Petition for aid by laborers, 45 

To) ice Commission, 57, 80, 332 

Harbor Master, 73, 150, 223, 328 

Management of public grounds, 108, 120, 123, 219 

Work on Back Bay Park, 121 

Mass. ('liar. iMcch. Exhibition, 141 

Unsafe buildings, 152 

Appropriation bill, 157 

Loans for Park purposes, 164 
School-house, AIMon District, 182, 188 
Public Library, 187 

Chain-cable factory at House Correction, 213 
Additional Water Supply appropriations, 225, 280, 299 
Requiring employes to be residents, 242, 200, 745 
Proof of statement in persoual explanation, 248 
Salary Hill, 200 

Director Last Boston Ferries, 292 

Alterations of the records, 302, 311 

Vacancj in Board of Kerry Directors, 808 
Salaries of Police Commissioners. 808, 352, 371 

, west Roxbury, 861 
Proposed visit to Sudbury river, 370 
Printing document on registration and elections, 389 

b Boston branch Library, 392, 477 
Bathing Department-, 390 
Police Station Six, 407 
Summer vacation, 422 

Playgrounds, 442 

Bauground on Common, 444 

Duties of Street Commissioners, 462, i>:;3, 637 

Powers of Police Commissioners, 450, 457, 468 

Premium on loans, 443 

Care of lunatics, 407 

Personal explanation, 477 

Salaries of police force, 475 

Painting office of Sup"t Common, 622 

New Court-House, 538, 501 

Sidewalk obstructions, 562 

Bast Boston Ferries, legal fees, 576,667, 685 

' Siege of Paris/' 581 

UnJici n-ed sale of lager beer and cider, 581 

Drake's History of Roxbury, 598 

Back fees to Deputy Collectors, 012 

Water Supply for East Boston, 618 

Stony lirook, 674 

Transfer ( f $1,800 to Law Department, 684 

Non-resident employ es, 704 

Ci ostables at elections, 7o:s 

Transfer of Insane, 73 1 , 767 

Annual dinner, 746 

Police distribution of documents, 749 

Pensioned policemen, 774 

Extra legal services, 775" 

Danforth, Ward 10 — remarks: 

Contracts involving employment of labor, 43 

Management of public grounds, 89, 108, 117, 123 

Mass. Char. Mecb. Exhibition, 104, 143, 175 

Superintendent of Common, 135 

Appropriation Bill, 159, 174 
ata, 198] 

Resignation, 191 
Day, Ward 4 — remarks : 

Joint rules and orders, 13 

Mill Pond Flats, 03 

Appropriation hill, 172 

Huntington avenue, 329 

South Boston Branch Library, 393 

Proposed abeption of certain commissions, 395 

Police Station Six, 407 

Roxbur; Canal, -bis 

Duties of Commissioners, 443, 451 

Powers of Police Commissioners, 468 

West Fourth street widening, 575 

Drake's History of Roxbury, 698 

Water Supply for East Boston, 618, 620, 635 

Street Commissioners, 634 

East Piston Ferries, legal fees, 666 
Devlin, Ward 13 — remarks : 

Superintendents of Bridges, 137 

Chain-cable factory at House Correction, 213 

Additional Water Suppl; itions,225 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 351 

South Boston Branch Library, 392 

Bathing Department, 396 

Police Commissioners, 411 
Dogs — 

Damage for fowls killed, a 85, 548 

East Boston Ferries — see Ferries 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



VII 



Elections — 

Recount of votes — Wards 20, 7, 8, 3, 25, c 4 

Wards 16, 18, c 14 

Special election in Ward 10, a 198, 254, 300, 314 

Constables, at elections, expediency, referred, c 285, a 287 : c 

703, a 711, c 747, a 750 
Special election for Alderman, a 290 : time allowed employes to 

vote, c 314, a 319 ; John P. Spanieling elected and qualified, 

a 336 
Statutes relating to registration and elections — see Printing, 

also Taxes 
Voting Precincts, report from Assessors, a 477 

Registration by precincts, c 458, a 460 

Maps, referred, c 458, a 460 

Voting-places, a 465, 526, 558, 559, 570, c 575, 581, a 582, 

59a, 593, c 595, 600, 625, 635 

Precinct officers, a 556, 558, 566, 568, 591, 600,601,021, 

638, 650, 653, 675 
Opportunity for city employes to vote, c 562, a 564 
Warrants issued for State Elections, a 574 
Petition for Greenback party precinct officers, referred to 

Mayor, 568 
Report of returns, state election, a 605, 623 
Voting precincts in Wards 23, 24, and 25, c 619, 635, a 638 
Warrants for City Election, a 625 
Repeal of election precincts, c 695, 710, 747 
Report of returns, City Election, a 698, a 714 
Elevated Railway — [c 612 

Notice of petition for charter referred, a 593 ; report, a 601, 604, 

Faunee, Alderman — remarks : 

Soup, 26 

Cession of Charles-river flats, 55, 6S 

Placing public grounds in care of Park Commissioners, S3 

Loan for improving parks, 112 

Building limits, 168 

Directors of Public Institutions, 185 

Bill of H. A. Winship, 185 

Decoration Day, 183, 208 

Appropriation Bill, 196 

Pay of lamplighters, 202 

Employes on public grounds, 208 

Salary Bill, 230 

Abatements of taxes, 228 

Sprinkling streets, 230 

Member of Boston Water Board, 255 

Pollution of Lake Cochituate, 256 

Death of Alderman Perkins, 276 

Harbor Master, 289 

Director for Public Institutions, 307 

Special election for Aldermen, 319 

Abating betterment assessments, 326 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 347 

Laborers on improved seweraire, 345 

Rosbury Canal, 403 

Public Lands, 398, 461 

Back Bay Park, 406 

New Building for Police Station Six, 406 

Concert garden in West Roxbury, 450 

C. M. Dakin's victuallers' license, 466 

Powers of Police Commission, 484 

Columbus ave. horse-car controversy, 493 

Regulating horse-car travel, 508, 607, 732 

Taking possession of lands, 514 

Extra pay in Collector's Department, 711 

Reduction of Market rents, 718 

New Court House, 721 

Kneeland-st. obstructions, 725 

South Boston Lunatic Hospital, 726 

Salaried officers to be residents, 751, 760 

Storm overflow for Roxbury Canal, 756 

Board of Public Works, 764 
Fees — 

For measuring grain, a 275 
Ferries — 

Expediency of laying out avenues as streets, referred, a 29, c 
30 ; report, a 70, referred to Street Commissioners, a 82, c 87, 
105, a 109, 148, c 152 ; report, a 287, 450, 465 

Request for authority to contract for fuel, referred, c 45, a 53 ; 
report, a 70, order passed, a 83, c 104 

Bequest for authority to contract for new and sell old ferry- 
boat, referred, c, 45, a 53 ; report, 70; order passed, a. 83 ; 
c 87, 104 

New building at South Ferry, c 182, 187, a 194 

Vacancy in Board of Directors, communication referred, a 274, 
c 277 ; report, expediency of amending referred, a 305, c 
308 ; reconsideration, c 312 ; report, c 455, 467, a 483 

Annual report, a 321 

Petition for reduction of toll, referred, a 326; report, 641; 
passed, 648 

Custody of Eastern-avenue wharf, a 324, 325, 336, 343, 344, 462 

Ferry Boat " General Grant," c 395 

Free on Fourth of July, a 402, c 407 

Investigation, petition referred, a 342, c 351 ; report, a 604, c 612 

Order for payment of S550 for legal services, referred, a 534 ; 
non-concurrence, c 538 ; reconsideration, assigned, c 662 
referred, c 575 : report, order passed, a 641 ; rejected, C 664 
reconsidered, passed, c 684 



.-ire Department — 

Report of fires and alarms for Dec.,c. 4 ; Jan., a 53 ; Feb., a 110; 
March, a 183 : April, c 284 : May, a 357 ; June, 446; July, 
490 : Aug., 513; Sept., 56S: Oct., 604 : Nov., 675 

$300 to Charles Brooks, a 17, c 37 

Fire Boat — rations to crew, referred, c 6 ; substitute order 
passed, a 8, c 12 ; report, referred, c 31, a 37, 40 ; report, c 
247 a 251 

$200 to Charles Furlong, c 107, a 109, c 165, a 168, 186 ; indefi- 
nitely postponed, a 203 

Explosive Compounds, order to report ordinance, a 129, c 135 ; 
_ report, a 289 ; passed, a 303, c 309 

Uniform for Fire Commissioners, report, c 165 a 168 

Vacations, order referred, c 193, a 194 ; report, c 247, a 251 

Request to investigate cause of fire in German Catholic. School 
building, c 248, a 251 : report, 530 

Duty of Fire Commissioners, order of inquiry indefinitely post- 
poned, c 285 

Telegraph in Brighton authorized, a 289 

Annual report, 486 
Fitchburg Railroad — 

Connection with Union Freight Railroad, a 429, 485 
Flynn, Ward 16 — remarks : 

Joint rules and orders, 12 

Police commission, 80 

Management of public grounds, 108, 120, 21S 

Superintendent of Public Grounds, 136 

Superintendent of Bridges, 137, 154 

Alterations of the Records, 311 

Fourth of July, 335 

Claims of West Roxbury laborers, 353 

Police Commissioners, 413 

Ballground on Common, 444 

Proposed contract for plants, 766, 776 
Fourth of July — 

Order offered, c 123, 313 

Mayor authorized to invite Orator, a 290, c 292 

Committee appointed, §10,000 appropriated, c 335, a 338 

Closing streets, a 429 

Thanks to Orator, c 444, a 446 

Regatta, cause of accident, Union Boat Club House, c 458 

Rowing Regatta, obstructions, c 444, a 446 
F'unds — see also Sinking Funds — 

Franklin Fund —examination of accounts, a 29, 38 

Edwin W. Beal, petition referred, a 303; report, 325, 363 

Charles H. Campbell, referred, a 39S ; report, 486 

G.A.R. — Decoration Day, request of Post 113, referred, c 122] 

Invitation for Decoration Day, accepted, a 146, c 152 

S200 to each Post Decoration Day , c 166, 174, a 183, 208, c 213, 262 

Decoration Day, order passed, a 306, c 30S ; half holiday to em- 
ployes, c 315, 317, a 319, c 328, 329 
Gas — 

Report on price, a 110 
Guild, Alderman — remarks : 

Back Bay Park, 37, 95, 110, 361, 401, 406, 514 

Police Commission, 33, 50 

Contracts involving employment of laborers, 39 

Cession of Charles-river flats, 55, 67 

Placing public grounds in care of Park Commission, S4 

Loan for improving park, 112 

Election of Superintendent of Common, 114 

Claims of AVest Roxbury laborers, 130, 357 

Mass. Charitable Mechanic Exhibition, 145 

Report on care of poor, 148 

Burning street lamps in night-time, 149 

Street obstructions, enforcing ordinances, 167 

Bill of II. A. Winship, 186 

Appropriation Dill, 196 

Special election in Ward 10, 19S 

Supplies for Common, etc., 202 

Employes on public grounds, 202, 205 

Decoration Day, 208 

Contracts involving employment of laborers, 227 

Personal explanation, 236 

Removal of fruit-stands, 252 

Temporary building on Common, 253 

Member of Boston Water Board, 256 

Harbor Master, 289 

Death of Alderman Perkins, 276 

Explosive Compounds, 303 

Vacancy in Board of Directors for Ferries, 305 

Special election for alderman , 319 

Laborers on Improved Sewerage, 345 

Salaries of Police Commissions! • . 318 

Foot-bridge at D street over O.C.K.R., 364 

Mass. College of Pharmacy, 385 

Dartmouth-street square, 386 

Taking birds for scientific purposes, 400 

Statue of Charles Sumner, 129, 489 

Prison Point Flats, 460 

Public Lands, 461 

C. M. Dakin's Victualler's License, 466 

Sewer and sidewalk assessments, 446 

Public Park Nursery at Austin Farm, 483 

Towers of Police Commission, 4 S '4 

Indexes in Registry of Deeds, 4^7 

Conditions in deeds. 489 



VIII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Publir Library report, 490 

Highland Railway, temporary tracks, 517 

Licenses, 505 

Naming Murray place, 531 

Government bonds as security, 533 

New Court-House, 535, 719, 735 

1'ay for fowls killed, 548 

Right of visit to Public Institutions, 564 

Precinct officers, 566 

Term of Superintendent of Common, 549 

Use of Mayhew School-house for homeless wanderers, 602 

Plants for Public Grounds, 042 

Commercial-street widening, i>54 

Coasting on Webster street, 683 

Obstruction of streets, 698 

Free use of Faneiiil Hall, 715 

Extra pay for policemen, 710 

Reduction of Market Rents, 717 

Notifications of Elections by Constables, 750 

Statue of Charles Sumner, 757 

Salaried officers to be residents, 750, 755, 789 

Thanks to Chairman, 7-1 

Kate of fare for Old South Ball, a 85 
Harbor — 

Annual report of Harbor Master, a 19 

Consolidation of steam facilities, referred, c 26, a 20: 

a 55 ; order passed, s 67, e 73, 104, a 109, c 122, a 186 ; re- 
jected, c 156, 181, a 898, c 407 
Resolve tor substituting row-boats for police, c 126,890, a 698 

Acceptance Of Act relating to Harbor Master, o 222, 226, a 228 
Harbor Master and harbor police, ordinance referred, 8 229 
c 238 ; report, a 239 ; passed, a 320, 828, 362 
Harris, Alderman — remarks : 

Refreshments and carriage-hire, 17, 27 
Police Commission, 60 

Cession of Charles-river fiats, 55 
Hereford street extension, 69 
Cambridge bridges, 71 

Sale of ferry-boat, s3 

East Boston Kerry Avenues, 109, 325 

Labor at public institutions, 111, 151 

Loan for Improving parks, 118 

Election of Superintendent of Common, 114 

Report on care of poor, 148 

Burning street lamps in night-time, 14') 

Telegraph poles in Brighton, 149 

Tablet on Christ Church, 151 

Building limits, 168 

Storage of paving materials, 167 

Repair-shop for ferries, 194 

Paj Of lamplighters. 201 

Supplies for Common, etc., 202 

Employee on public grounds, 203, 206 
Payment of Mr Winship's bill, 203 

Special election in Ward 10, 198 

Improved Sewerage construction, 208, 532 

Decoration Pn\ , 206 

Contracts involving employment of laborers, 22> 

Salary Bill, 281 

Mercantile Wharf Market, 235 

Abatement of taxes. 228 

Leave to move wooden buildings, 229 

Sprinkling streets, 230 

Removal of House of Correction, 261 

Temporary building on Common, 253 

Public Library , 267 

Removal of obstructions from Public streets, 273 

Heath of Alderman Perkins, 270 

Explosive Compounds, 808 

Director of East Boston Jerries, 306 

Unsafe Public Buildings, 307 

Special election tor alderman, 319 

Abating betterment assessments, 326 

Ousted) Ol l-.a.-iein-avenue wharf, 336, 344 

Swett street, 313 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 347 

New Boiler-house at Jail, 350 

Back Bay Park, 362, 406, 515 

Foot-bridge at 1) street over O.C.R.R., 363, 384 

Bridge over R.R. at Dartmouth street, 365 

Paving Sudbury street, 364 

Vacation Schools. 886 

Mass. College of Pharmacy, 385 

Old State Prison for House of Correction, 385 

Paving Frothingham avenue, Charlestown, 387 

Huntington avenue, 398 

Railroad tracks on Causeway street, 399 

Taking of birds for scientific purposes, 400 

Roxbury Canal, 404 

New building for Police Station Six, 406 

Eitchburg R.R. connection with Union Freight R.R., 429 

Sewer and sidewalk assessments, 446 

South Boston Branch Library, 483 

$2,000 transfer for Austin Farm, a 483 

Indexes in Registry of Deeds, 486 

Phipps-street burying-ground, 487 

Conditions in deeds, 489 



Public Library report, 490 

Columbus avenue horse-car controversy, 498 

Licenses, 505 

Meridian street bridge, 505 

Regulation of horse-car travel, 509, 043, 732, 750 

Settlement of abatements, 514 

Taking possession of lands, 514 

New Court House, 518, 534, 643, 785 

Polling-places, 526 

Cazenove place, 631 

Repairing bridges on Westchester Park, 531 

Sudbury-river conduit, 548 

Pay for fowls killed, 548 

Right of visit to Public Institutions, 564 

Prison Point Flats, 566 

Government bonds as security, 533 

Land near Police Station Eight, 568 

Commercial-street widening, 569, 602, 624, 640, 655 

Polling-place for Precinct Four, Ward Bight, 570 

Paving Warren street, Charlestown, 671 

Adams street, macadamising, 572 

Reimbursement for care of poor in City Hospital, 590 

Use of Mayhew School-house for homeles- wanderers, 592, 601 

Back fees to Deputy Collectors, 621,646 

Extension of East Chester Park, 024, 711 

Fast Boston Ferries, claim for legal services, 641 

Plants for Public Grounds, 642 

New Court House, 043 
Laving out A street, 038, 6S2 
Fast Boston Ferries, reduction of toll, 048 
Highland R. It. tracks in Haymarket square, 662 
Protection of Lake Coohitttate, 653 
Northampton-street District, 055 
Purchase of gravel bank at Watertown, 681, 701 
Cancelling bonds on Public Lands, 650 
Coasting on Webster street, 682 
Obstruction of streets, ; 
Popular loans, 096 
Kneeland-street obstruction, 725 
South Boston Lunatic Hospital, 727 
Investigation of Public Institutions, 711 
Improved sewerage, and Fast Chester Park, 728 
Notifications of Elections by Constables, 750 
Salaried officers to be residents, 751, 702 
Services of .lames Dennic, 767 
So. Boston U. It. over Dover-street Bridge, 757; 
East. Chester Park bridge, 758 
Board of Public Works, 704 
Thanks to Chairman, 781 
Hayden, Alderman — remarks : 

" EglestOD Square School-house lot, 186 
Pay to a disabled fireman, 186 
Printing Auditor's Annual Report, 290 
Vacation Schools, 385 

Use of May hew School-house for homeless wanderers, 592, 601 
South Boston Lunatic Hospital, 72> 
New Court House, 788 

Salaried officers to be residents, 750, 755, 762 
Health, Board of — 

$300 transfer, c 22, a 26', c 33 

Mill Pond flats, reports, c 45; order to report cost, 46, a 53 ; 

report, order passed, 63, a 68; order to owners, referred, 

a 307, o 308 ; report, a 448, 449, c 451, 454, 458, a 461, c 467, 

a 527,528,560, 764 
Lying-in Hospital, applications granted, a 228, 752 
Request for authority to erect urinals, a 425; report, a 498; 

order passed, a 5n0, o 628 
Nuisance at South End, petition referred, a 429 ; report, a 446 
Annual report, a 485 
Communication relating to condition of Ward street, Ward 22, 

referred, a 513 : report. 574 
Abatement ofnulsanoe assessments, a 570, 693 
North Grove-street Morgue, communication referred, a 622, 
JS : order passed, a 758, c 772 
Health Department — 

Superintendent authorized to purchase horses, supplies, etc., 

c 14, 22,* 20 
Disposition of street-sweepings and ashes, c 444, a 446 
City stables in Charlestown, a 625, c 628 
House Offal, reduction in price, a 752, c 765 
Hibbard, Ward 17 — remarks : 
Finance Committee, 
Joint rules and orders, 15 
Vegetable market, 73 

Official terms of members of city government, 91 
Appropriation for public instruction, 121 
Appropriation Bill, 160, 173 
South Boston Branch Library, 192 
Loam for public grounds, 247 
Trustee of City Hospital, 268, 407 
Additional Water Appropriation, 299 
Alterations of the Records, 302 
Proposed visit to Sudbury river, 352, 369, 379 
Ungraded streets, 369 
Salaries of Police Commissioners, 375 
Music on Common, 376 
South Boston Branch Library, 391 
Sale of Ferry Boat " General Grant," 395 



JNDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



IX 



Playgrounds, ill 
Ballground on CommoD, 444 
Director for Public Institutions, 454 
Powers of Police Commissioners, 472 
Painting office of Superintendent of Common, 522 
East Boston Ferries, legal fees, 576, 665 
Public Institutions, investigation, 580 
Non-resident employes, 709 
Plants for Public Grounds, 776 
Highland Street Railway Co. — 

Order to restrict cars on Columbus avenue and Tremont street, 

129, 145 
Memorial referred, 250 
Petition for tracks on Pack Bay, 318 
Hearing on running to northern depots ; 381, 425 ; report, 

leave to withdraw, accepted, 492 
Hearing on Columbus-avenue tracks, 479; report, etc., see 

Metropolitan K It. Co. 
Temporary tracks on Tennyson street, authorized, 517 
Regulation of horse-car travel, report, see Metropolitan lt.lt. 

Co. ; also 722, 731, 737 
Petition for extension of route to Haymarket square, referred, 

554 ; resolve passed, 645 ; order passed. 652, 769 
Location in Haymarket square accepted, 675 
Hill, Ward 14 — remarks : 
Badges, 6 

Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 178, 210, 286, 295 
South Boston Branch Library, 192, 391, 477 
Trustee of City Hospital, 258 
Proposed abolition of certain commissions, 395 
Police Station Six, 407 
Personal explanation, 477 
A street, 628 

Pensioned policemen, 775 
Historic sites — 

Tablet on Christ Church, a 151, c 154 
History of Koxbury — see Printing 
Howland, Ward 5 — remarks : 

Superintendent of Bridges, 137, 153 
Powers of Police Commissioners, 475 

Improved Sewerage — 

Joint Special Committee to resume charge, c 3 

Old Harbor Point, order to take land, a 29, 37, c 42 

$14,775, expenditure authorized, a 85, c 104 

Construction by days' labor authorized, a 208, c 222, 226 

Ncn-resident employes — see City Laborers. 

Contractor on Improved Sewerage, proposed investigation, 
c 379, 703 

Taking lands, c 377, a 386, c 389, a 447, c 451, a 460, c 612, a 648, 
c 663, 684 

Roxbury Canal — see heading " Roxbury Canal." 

$341,000 loan — see Loans. 

Order of notice of intention to take land, a 510, c 510 ; taking 
lands on Clapp street, a 532, c 538 

United States, Massachusetts, or City of Boston Bonds, as 
security, authorized, a 533, c 538 

Committee authorized to modify or abrogate contracts, a 510, 
c 510 

East Chester Park — See streets 

Charging $22,957.25 to widening streets, a 723, 728 

Storm overflow into Roxbury canal, see Legislative matters. 
Inspector of Lime — 

Order for appointment, laid on table, c 524 ; indefinitely post- 
poned, 703 

Jury List — see County of Suffolk 

Kelley, Ward 6 — remarks: 

Superintendent of Public Grounds, 60 

Pensioned policemen, 748 
Kendricken, Ward 20 — remarks : 

Loam for public grounds, 247 

Roxbury canal, 440 

East Chester Park, 630 
Kidney, Ward 6 — remarks : 

Voting precincts, Wards 23, 24 and 25, 635 

Lamp Department — 

Annual report of Superintendent, a 9 

Supt. authorized to purchase supplies, etc., and employ men, a 29 

Reduction of time of burning, referred, a 11 : report, 128, 149 

Pay of lamplighters, a 201, 205 
Land enclosed — 

Notice from Trustees of African Methodist Episcopal Society , 
500 
Lauten, Ward 14 — remarks : 

Accounts of Water Board, 74 

Police belts, 122 

Appropriation Bill, 172 

Chain-cable factory, 190 

Trustee of City Hospital, 309 

Police Commissioners, 412 

Playgrounds, 441 

West Fourth street widening, 675 

Free sale of lager beer and cider, 695 

A street, 628 

Stony Brook, 674 



Non-resident employes, 705 
Transfer of the Insane, 767 
Law Department — 

Semi-annual report of City Solicitor, a 427 

Request for three additional clerks, a 621, c 628, a 653, c 663 

a 675, c 684 
Proposed ordinance relating to fees, referred, c 636, a 638 
Employment of legal counsel, order passed to report ordinance, 

c 695, a 696; report, ordinance passed, c 775, a 780 
Legislative matters — 

Uncollectable taxes, referred, a 11, c 12; report, order passed 

a 28, e 30 
Nuisance in Charlestown, a 29; referred, c 30, a 37 
Masked Balls, a 38 
Police Commission, a 38, c 75 
Salaries of County officers— see County of Suffolk 
Cession of Charles-river flats — see Public Parks 
Loan for improving parks — see Public Parks 
Taxing auction sales, order passed, a 148 
Tax titles, expediency of petitioning for repeal referred, c 182, 

a 183 ; report, order passed, a 713 ; c 737 
Statutes relating to registration and elections, and collection of 

taxes — see Taxes ; also Printing. 
Victualler's licenses and sale of beer and cider — see Licenses 
State aid, regulation of payment by city, a 714, c 737 
Authorizing payment of $57.15 to .Joanna Wells, a 753, c 765 
Storm overflow into Roxbury Canal, a 723, 728, 755, c 765 
License Commissioners — 
Annual report, c 214 
Licenses — 

Sale of old pipe, report, c 165, a 168 

Sunday amusements, order passed to restrict, a 251 

lnnholders' and Victuallers' Licenses, order passed, a 289 

Legality of licenses by commissioners, request referred, a 343 

Summer garden at West Roxbury, a 427, 448, 450, 461 

C. M. Dakin's Victualler's License, 466 

Victualler's licenses, and sale of beer and cider, orders to 

petition, a 549, 556 ; c 561, 577, 581 ; rejected, c 595 
Fee for liquor license refunded, a 559, c 561, c 581 
Liquor seizures, order of inquiry referred, c 562 
Order to refund license fee paid by Thomas Hartnett, referred, 

c 563, 564 ; report, c 597 
Lighters — see Ballast Lighters 
Loans — 

Expediency of popular loan, referred, c 25, a 26 ; report, c 690, 

a 696 
$600,000 for new supply of water — see Water 
Disposition of Premiums, expediency of ordinance referred, c 

302, a 303, c 316 ; report, c 443, a 446 
$1,500,000 in anticipation of taxes, a 361, 384, c 414 
$341,000 for Roxbury Canal Improvement, c 453, 458, a 460 
Lynn and Boston Railroad — 

Hearing on running to Temple place, a 66 ; report, 128, 149 

Markets — 

Superintendent authorized to employ deputy, a 70 

Vegetable market, expediency of purchase referred, a 70, c 73 ; 
report, a 185, 235, c 238 ; discharge of mortgage authorized, 
a 641 

Rents reduced, a 717 
Mass. Charitable Mechanic Association — 

Petition referred, a 55,c57; report, orders passed, a 96; dis- 
cussed, 103; request of City Solicitor's opinion, c 104, 
a 109 ; report, orders passed, c 140, a 145, c 152, 175, a 183, 
a 275 

Petition from Manager of Siege of Paris Exhibition, a 621 ; 
petition for removal of Exhibition building, order passed, 
a 640 
Mayor — 

Cony of Inaugural Address requested, c 2, a 8 

Disposition of topics in address, referred, c 2, a 8 ; report, and 
reference of topics, c 23, a 26 

Message relating to Court House — see County of Suffolk 

Post office extension — see Streets 

Care of Lunatics — see Public Institutions 

Treatment of the Poor — see Poor 

McDouald, Ward 12 — remarks : 

Vegetable Market, 73 

Salaries of employed of public institutions, 107 

Playground on Common, 182 

Chain-cable factory, 190, 296 

Labor on public grounds, 220 

Salary Bill, 259 

Horatio Harris estate for park, 311 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 370, 456 

Music on Common, 376 

Roxbury Canal, 438 

Ballground on Common, 444, 459 

Salaries of Police force, 475 

Painting office of Superintendent of Commou, 623 

Drake's History of Roxbury, 698 

Back foes to Deputy Collectors, 614 

Dissection of dead bodies, 617 

Salary of Probation officer, 690 

Public Institutions, investigation, c 693 

Non-resident employes, 710 

Transfer of the Insane, 770 

Pensioned Policemen, 774 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF (TIY COUNCIL. 



McGaragle, Ward 8 — remarks: 
Badge- , 6 

Joint rales and orders, 13 
Free soup, -4 

Nuisance in Chariestown, 30 
Supcriu' 'iug, 81 

Public Baths, 84, 94, 105 
Classification of voters, 35 
Petition for aid by laborers, 45 
Mill Pond Flats, 46 
Police Commission, 59, 64, 76 , 330 
Superintendent of Public Grounds, 62, 136 

table Market, 73 
Harbor Master, 73, 156 
Management of public grounds, 90, 107, 117 
Police Belts, 81 
Pay <>f laborers, 91 
Charles-river embankment, 91 
Official term of members of city government, 91 

8. Char. Mcch. Exhibition, 104, 141 
Salaries of employes in public institutions, 107 
Work on Back Bay Park, 120 
Superintendents of Bridies, 137, 154 
Loan for park purpose.', 140, lti4 
Unsafe buildings, 152 
Manufacture of chain cables, 155, 181 
Appropriation Bill, 162, 172 
Roxbury Canal, hU 
Army and Navy Memorial, 166 
Building limits, 172 
IBrn 

lie Library, 1«7 
S. Boston Branch Library, 191, 390, 477 
Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 212 

Decoration Day, 218 

Labor on public grounds, 218 

: Sewerage, 222 
Employes on public grounds, 222 
Additional water supply appropriations, 225, 226, 282, 297 

. l!ill,260 
Constables at Elections, 285 
Orator for Fourth of July, 202 

Ion in Ward 10, J 
Proposed purchase of Long Island, 310 
Director East lic.ston ferries, 312 

Sei lewalk assessments, 314 

Trustee City Hospital, 828, 309 
Decoration Day , 320 
Lag] et, \V'< si Boxbury, 351 

osed visit to Sudbury river, 352, 370 

ateentb of -im 
Salaries of Police Commissioners, 373, 457 
Music on the Common, 377, 478 
Harbor Police, 300 
Back Hay Park, 407 

Police Commissioners, 411, 456, 458, 468 
li High anl Latin School roof, 413 

ding Monument Hill, 421 
Summer \ acation. 422 
Boxbury Canal, 437 
Playgrounds, 441, 443 
Duties of Commissioners, 444, 452 
Ballground on Common, 444, 459 
Prison Point Flats, 454 
Fourth of July Regatta, 458 

Salaries of 1'oiicc force. 475 

Imprct cage, modifying contracts, 611 

Painting office of Superintendent of Common, 522 

Public urinals, 623 

Fast Boston Ferries, legal fees, 538, 576 

New Court-House, 640 

; of visit to Public Institutions, 542 
Liquor licensee I 

i Police Department, 578 
"Si< 591 

Collectors, 013 
Voting precincts in "Wards 23, 24, and 25, 620, 636 

Park, 628,689 
Street Commissioners, G35, 637, 673 
Water Supply for East Boston, 635 
Stony Brook, 668 

Paj of laborers before Thanksgiving, 664 
Public Institutions, investigation, 6b3 
\c ii i -ii ild( nl employes 703, 740 
Transfer of Insane," 739, 767 
Annual dinner, 710 
Pensioned D 748, 774 

Police dish Ibution of documents, 749 
Proposed contract, ior plants, 706, 777 
Strike at Grand Junction Wharf, /73 
Bast Chester park bridge, 772 
Thanks to the President., 777 
McGeough, Ward 13 — remarks: 

Management of public grounds, 117, 123 

Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 185, 166, 177, 190, 

212,286,292 
Appropriation Bill, 163 
Unsafe buildings, 152 



Stipts. of Bridges, 164 

Special Election in Ward 10, 

Seventeenth of J une 

Salaries of police Commissioners 370 

Music on Common. :;7 i; 

Contractor on Improved Sewerage, 879 

Proposed abolition of certain commissions, 394 

Police Commissioners, 108, 473 

Grading Monument Hill, 421 

Duties of Commissioners, 443, 451 

Roxbury Canal, 453 

Back Bay Park, 521 

Brighton Grammar School-house, 538 

Right of visit to Public Institutions, 541 

Dissection of dead bodies, 578, 595, 617 

Public Institutions, investigation, 680, 691 

Street Commissioners, 616, 682, 636, 673 

Salary of Piobation Officer, 028 

East Boston Perries, legal fees, 065, 685 

Non-resident employes, 705, 744 

Proposed transfer of the Insane, ?37 

Flection of Street Commissioner, 765 

Transfer of the Insane, 769 

(ke at Grand Junction Wharf, 773 
Policemen, 775 

i , Alderman — remarks : 

Refreshments and carriage-hire, 18, 27 
Em its on sidewalks, 20 

Soup, 20 

Contracts involving employment of laborers, 39 

Polii c Commission, 63 

Cession of Cb I er Flats, 55, 68 

Harbor Master, 07, - 

Hereford-street extension, 69 

i Cambridge Bridges. 71 

Sale of ferry-boat, B3 

Placing public grounds in care of Park Commissioners, 84 

Loan for improvin r parks, 112 

of public, instruction, 126 
Claims of West Boxbury laborers, 130 % S57 
Mass. Char. Mech. Exhibition, 145 
Telegraph poles in Brighton, 149 
Tablet on Christ Church, 151 
Building limits, 108 
Bill of ii. A. Wiuship,185 
Water Commissioner, 186 
Pay to a disabled fireman, 186, 203 
Repair shop for ferries, 194 
Appi opriation Bill, 195 
Pay of lamplighters, 201 
Employ 6s on public grounds, 202, 207 
Contrails involving employment of laborers, 228 

, Bill, 231 
Mercantile Wharf market, 236 
Temporary building on Common, 254 
Member of Boston Water Board, 254 
Pollution Of Lake Cochituate, 266 
Uncollected bill for iron, 257 
Second-hand dealers and, pawnbrokers, 288 
Director East Boston Ferries, 200, 305 
Printing Auditor's Annual Report, 296 

. le Public Buildings, 307 
Director for Public Institutions, 307 
Decoration Day, 319 
Special election for alderman, 319 
East Boston Ferry avenues, 325, 450, 465 
Horse-car blockades, 326 

tody ol Eastern-avenue wharf, 337, 344 
Discontinuing Lagrange street, 343 
Laborers on improved Sewerage, 346 
of Police Commissioners, 848 
New Boiler-house at Jail, 350 
Back Baj I'm 1:, "01, 401, 406, 516 
Foot-bridge at l> street, over O.C.R.R., 363,384 
er U. It. at Dartmouth street, 866 

idon Schools, 886 
Dartmouth -street square, 386 
Paving Frothingham avenue, Chariestown, 887 
Public Lands, 3US, 401 
Grading Huntington avenue, 898 
Railroad tracks on Causeway street, 400 
Taking birds for scientific purposes, 400 
Free Ferries on Fourth of July, 402 
Boxbury Canal, 405 

Fitchburg Baihoad, connection with UnionFreight Railroad, 4301 
Prison Point Hats, 440, 400 
Care of Lunatics, 405 
Construction of Sewers, 465 
C. M. Dakin'S victualler's license, 406 

vers of Police Commission, 484 
Indexes in Registry of Deeds, 487 
Conditions in deeds, 489 

Columbus avenue horse-car controversy, 492, 499 
Regulation of horse-car travel, 497, 508, 660, 606, 626, 644, 699, 

732, 750 
Meridian-street bridge, 506 
, Settlement of abatements, 514 

Highland-street Railway, temporary tracks, 617 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XI 



Cazenove place, 531 

Naming Murray place, 531 

Government bonds as security, 533 

New Court-House, 519, 534, 546, 720, 733 

Sudbury-river conduit, 560, 610 

Prison Point Flats, 566 

Salary of Superintendent of Ferries, 547 

Commercial-street, widening, 554, 569, 602, 639 

Land near Police Station Eight, 569 

Macadamizing Adams street, 572 

Salary of Probation Officer, 625 

Back pay to Deputy Collectors, 645 

East Boston Ferries, claim for legal services, 641 

East Boston Ferries, reduction of toll, 648 

Protection of Lake Cochituate, 653 

Purchase of gravel bank in Watertown, 681, 702 

Coasting on Webster street, 682 

Extension of A street, 682 

Obstruction of streets, 696 

Election returns, 698 

Free use of Faneuil Hall, 715 

Extra pay for Policemen , 716 

Reduction of market rents, 717 

South Boston Lunatic Hospital, 726 

Extra compensation in Collector's Department, 712 

Knceland street obstructions, 725 

Improved sewerage and East Chester Park, 728 

Non-resident employes, 754, 763 

Services of .lames Dennie, 757 

Board of Public Works, 764 
Metropolitan It. It. Co. — 

Hearing ou tracks in Boylston and Clarendon streets, a 07 

Order to restrict cars on Columbus avenue, a 129, 145 

Petition for tracks on Back Bay, a 318 

Change on Clarendon street authorized, a290; accepted, a 321 

Location ou West Chester Park, hearing, a 397 

Turnout track, Washington street, Dorchester, a 462, 485 

Turnout track, Atlantic avenue, Dorchester, a 462, 485 

Gars on Columbus avenue, hearing, 401, 426 ; petition from 
Highland Railroad Co., referred, 429 ; hearing, 479 ; report, 
order to discontinue passed, a 492, 498 

Petition for removal of tracks on Harrison avenue, Dover, Al- 
bany, and Kingston streets, referred, a 488 

Regulation of horse-car travel, report, a 495 ; substitute order 
offered, 497 ; laid on table, 509 ; order passed to obtain 
opinion of City Solicitor, 509 ; special assignment, 537 ; 
hearing 583 ; substitutes offered and assigned, 606 ; orders 
passed relative to licensing drivers, etc., a 625, c 632 ; double 
track ou Tremont street, 625, 643, 675 ; report, 722 ; orders 
passed. 731: order to enforce ordinances, 732, 750; sundry- 
orders indefinitely postponed, 737 

Fifth location accepted, 641 

Curved tracks ou Hanover street, 681 

Dartmouth street location, hearing, 657 ; leave to withdraw, 
752 

Fifty-sixth and fifty-seventh locations accepted, 697 

Removal of tracks from Harrison avenue, referred to next 
Board of Aldermen, 732 
Middlesex Railroad Co. — 

Leave to lay tracks from car-house on Main street, Charlestown , 
399 

Location accepted, 465 

Regulation of horse-car travel, report — see Metropolitan R.R. 
Co. ; also 722, 731 

Petition relating to hearing, 509 

Protest from citizens of Everett, referred, 625 

Orders laid on table, 627 

Six cars per hour to southern depots, 698 

Three additional cars per hour through Temple place, 759, 763 

No suburban cars north of Scollay square, 759, 763 
Militia — 

Battery A, $700 for shutters, 29 

Co. A, First Bat. Inf., $1,008.57 for armory, 169 

Co. H., Fifth Reg. Inf., $300 for armory, 290 

Co. A, Fourth Bat. Inf., $250. fitting up armory, 324 

$800, rent of armory, 324 

$350, fitting up armory, Co. C, Ninth Bat. Inf., 447 

Drill-hall of Mass. Inst. Technology, 447 

Co. D, First Bat. Inf., $175 for closets, 487 

Co. D., Fourth Bat. Inf., $450 for rent of armory, 498 

$315 repairing armory, 570 

Co. E., Ninth Bat. Inf., $300 for rent, 534 

Permanent allowance to eachArmory for fuel and light, 623 

Co. II. Fifth Reg. Inf. $22.67 ; fitting up Armory, 642 

Co. E. Ninth Reg. Inf., $600 for rent, 715 

Co. A. Ninth Reg. Inf., $700 for rent, 730 
Milk — 

Annual report of Inspector, a 170 
Minors — 

Board of Aldermen authorized to make rules or grant licenses, 
a 11, c 12 

Rules adopted, a 19 
Mowry , Ward 11 — remarks : 

Roxbury Canal, 5, 437, 452 

Badges, 6 

Free soup, 24 

Nuisance in Charlestown, 30 

Contracts involving employ meut| of labor, 43 



Mill Pond Flats, 45, 63 

Police Commission, 77, 330 

Sale and purchase of ferry-boats, 87 

Management of public grounds, 120 

Supts. of Bridges, 137, 153 

Mass. Char. Mech. Exhibition, 141, 176 

Unsafe buildings, 152 

Appropriation Bill, 160 

Interest to be charged upon tax, 189 

Salary Bill, 260 

Constables at Elections, 285, 563 

Orator for Fourth of July, 292 

Special election in Ward 10, 301 

Harbor Master, 328 

Trustee City Hospital, 328 

Decoration Day, 329 

Claims of West Roxbury Laborers, 353 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 372 

Music on Common, 377 

South Boston Branch Library, 391 

Sale of ferry-boat " General Grant," 396 

Police Commissioners, 409, 470 

Ballground on Common, 444 

Prison Point Flats, 451 

Improved Sewerage, modifying contracts, 510 

Painting office of Sup'fc Common, 522 

Inspector of Lime, 524 

East Boston Ferries, legal fees, 538, 575, 664, 685 

West I'ourth-street widening, 575 

Drake's History of Roxbury, 597 

Back fees to Deputy Collectors, 613 

Street Commissioners, 616 

Voting precincts in Wards 23, 24, and 25, 620, 635 

East Chester Park, 629, 669 

Lease of building on Warren-street bridge, 684 

Stony Brook, 688 

Transfer of Insane, 739, 772 

Election of Street Commissioner, 765 
Muddy River — see Stony Brook Improvement 
Mullane, Ward 12 — remarks : 

Loam for public grounds, 247 
Mullen, Ward 13 — remarks : 

Second Assistant Assessors, 89 

Police belts, 122 

Supts. of Bridges, 137, 153 

Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 181, 211 

Appropriation Bill, 164 

Harbor Master, 223 

South Boston Branch Library, 393, 477 

Playgrounds, 442 

Improved Sewerage, modifying contracts, 511 
Mystic Valley Railroad — 

Leave to withdraw, a 97 

Nason, Ward 17 — remarks : 

Appropriation Bill, 163 

S. Boston Branch Library, 191, 477 

Proposed visit to Sudbury river, 352 

Sale of ferry-boat " General Grant," 396 

Dissection of dead bodies, 5S0 
New York and New England Railroad Co. — 

Petition for repair of bridge at Quincy street, Dorchester, le av« 
to withdraw, a 641 
Northampton-st. District - 

c G63, a 6 75 



Mandamus from Supreme Judicial Court, c 187, a 194 
Request for $4,000 additional appropriation, a 655, 



c684 

O'Connor, Ward 8 — remarks : 

Decoration Day, 329 

Rowing Regatta, 444 
Omnibuses, etc. — 

Grove Hall to Mt. Hope Cemetery, a 342 
Passenger wagons licensed : — 

Bowdoin sq. to Rowe's, Litchfield's and India wharves, a 96 

Sullivan sq. to Litchfield's, Howe's and India wharves, a 96 

Ilaymarket sq. to Rowe's and Litchfield's wharves, a 96 

Fitchburg R. Station to Rowe's and Litchfield's wharves, a 90 

Bowdoiu sq. to Rowe's wharf, a 96 

Bowdoin square to Litchfield's wharf, a 427 

Park square to Rowe"s wharf, a 427 
Overseers of Poor — [see also City Officers] — 

Quarterly reports, a 38, 273, 490 

Resignation of F. W. Lincoln, a 170, c 172 

Annual report, c 353 

Report of property, a 386, c 389 

Resignation of Henry L. Richards and George Curtis, a 490 

Resignation of Washington L. Prescott, c C16, a 621 

Passenger wagons — see Omnibuses, etc. 
Pawnbrokerage — 

Regulation of Interest, c 394, a 397, c 668, a 676 
Pearl, Ward 1 — remarks : 

Public Baths, 25, 34, 94, 105 

Sale and purchase of ferry-boats, 87 

Appropriation Bill, 161 

School-house, Allstou District, 182 

Director East Bostou Ferries, 291 

East Boston Ferries, legal fees, 576, 664, 684 



XII 



INDEX TO PROCKKD1NGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Perham, Ward 23 — remarks : 

Fourth of July, 313, 335 

Huntington ave., 328 

Lagrange street, West Roxbury, 351 

Ungraded streets, 3(59 

Koxbury Canal, 442, 453 

Playgrounds, 442 

Prison Point Flats, 451 

Duties of Street Commlwtonw, 452, 599,615 

Fourth of July Regatta, 4'jb 

Settlement of betterments, 689 

Public urinals, 628 

Now Court House, 540 

West Fourth-street widening, 576 

Invitation to " Siege of Paris, - ' 581 

Drake's History of Roxburj , 598 

Barton court, 599 

Dissection of dead bodies, lilS 

Toting precincts in Wards '23, 24, and 25, 020 

East Chester Park, 628. 069, 090 

Street Commissioners, 685, 030, 072 

Non-resident employes, 709 

linn I.!' Street Commissioner, 765 
Perkins. A Merman — remarks : 

Soup, 26 

c Commission, 52 

Decease. 275 
Pierce, Ward 24 — remarks i 

Joint Rules and Orders, 12 

Public Baths, 26 

Supt's of Bridges, 152 

Army and Navv .Memorial, 174 

South Boston Branch Library, 191, 378, 890, 477 

Interest to be charged upon tax, 190 

Additional water supplj appropriation, 220, 281 

Proof of statement in personal explanation, 248 

Protecting tributaries of Lake Cochituatc, 258 

Premiums on Loan-, ;!17 

Police Commission, 889 

Visit to Sudbury river, 379 

Contractor on improved Sewerage, 379 

Printing Document on Registration and Flections, 389 

Proposed abolition of certain commissions. 896 

Koxbury Canal, 4U7 

l'la\ grounds, 4 12 

Duties of Commissioners, 444 

Summer . 170, 478 

Dartmou' >i idge, 510 

Improved Sewerage, modifying contrasts, 510 

Settlement of betterments, .322 

Drake's Historj of Koxbury, 689 

Street Commissioners, 615, 635 

Voting precincts in Wards 23, 24, and 25, 020. 635 

Bast Chesti r Park, 629 

East Bo ton Perries, legal fees, 667 

Transfer of insane, 74->, 770 

Repeal of election prcciui ts, 747 

Plimpton, Ward 21 —remarks: 

Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 211 
Trustee of city Hospital, 277 
Additional Water Appropriation, 297 
Premiums on Loans, 317 

Seventeenth of Juni . 

Drake's History of Koxbury, 598 

i Commissioners, 637 
Public Institutions, investigation, 691 

Non-resident employes, 705 
Police — Quarterly reports of Chief, a 18, a 183, a 447 

Annual report of Chief, a 18 

Bleeping horses, purchasing furniture and supplies, making re- 
pairs, authorized, a 20 

Police Commission — see Legislative Matters 

Expediency of wearing belts, referred, c 91 ; indefinite! 
poned, c 122 

Annual Report of Trustees of Police Charitable Fund, a 274 

Polio loners, appointed, a 380, c 408; office 1 

a 487 

Powers of Police Commissioners, c 455, 457, 4G7, a 483 

Salaries (1 ioners — see Salaries. 

Joint Standing Committee, order constituting passed, c 562, 
577 ; appointed, •> 1, a .5S2 

Monthly reports of Commissioners, Oct. c 601, Nov. a 050 

Pensioning Patrolmen, c 036, a 638,c 747, 774 

Ordinance authorizing special police for departments, 1 

Extra pay for Police n, a 710, 729, c 773, 776 

Distribution of Documents, c 749, a 750, 758, c 765 

Enforcement of ordinances relating to horse-cars, 750 
— sec also ,; Overseers of Poor," also " Soup for the Poor." 

Report of Commissioners on Treatment of the Poor, referred, 
a 203, c 277 

Old Hayhew schoolhouse, communication from Mayor referred, 
a 517, c 561 i report, order referred, c 578, a 682; report, a 
592 ; order passed, a 601 , c 612 

Dissection of dead bodies, order rejected, c 578; reconsideration 
refused, 595; investigating committee appointed, c '',.', ; re- 
port, referred to next city government, c 7'5,a 780 
, Benjamiu, Ward 15 — 

Elected President, 1 ; address, 1 



Printing and ltindiug — 

Annual reports authorized in print, c 3, a 8 

Municipal Register authorized, c 3 , a 8 

Mayor's Inaugural Address, e 2. as [c 31, a 68 

Superintendent of Printing, report of ordinance, c 22 ; passed, 

Army and Navy Monument Memorial, second edition, referred, 
c 15, a 17; report, a 38, c 42; order ottered, a 100; re- 
ferred, 176, a 183, report, c 220, a 227 

Annual Report of Superintendent, a 14ti 

Report of Commission on relief of poor, a lis, e 152 

Statutes relating to Registration and Elections, and Collection 
of Taxes, c 302, a 808, e 317, a ;>1K, c 37S, a 3*4, a MS!), a 398 

Drake's History of Koxbur\ , order referred, <• 6S0, a 582; re- 
port, c 597. 015, a 021 ; c 036, 072, a 676 

Graveyards of Boston, order referred, c 095, a 696 ; report inex- 
pedient, c 749, :i 750 

Binding Documents and Proceedings of Citv Council, c 749, a 
750 
Prison Point Flats -see Health, Hoard of, " Mill Pond Blata » 
Public Paths — 

Repairs and assistance authorized, c 25, a 27 

Expediency of placing under Hoard of Health, a 27, c 30, 34, 
a 105,396 

Soutli Boston, order referred, c 444, a 440 

Annual report, a 754 
Public Buildings — see also Schools — 

Furniture, repairs, etc , authorized, a 20. c 31 

Annual report of Superintendent, a 40 

Order to report unsafe buildings, a 72, 83, 148, c 152, a 276, 807 ; 
report, a 823 

Sale of engine-house lot, Charlestown District, a 111, c 116. 

Common street School-house, Char'ostown, claim of .Mary W. 
Wyman, report, a 185, order passed, a 194, c 238 

Quinev Hall, lease approved, a 228 

Mass. Colleg?of Pharmacy, use of rooms in Franklin School- 
house granted, 377, a 3S5 

High and Latin School building — see Schools 

Police Station Six, expediency of new site and building, c 394, 
a 400, c 407 ; report, c 470, a 483 

Kaneuil Hall, rearrangement of portraits, 429 

Construction and repair of buildings, report, c 44o, a 440 

New Court llotist — see County of Suffolk. 

Free use of F'aueuil Hull, petition referred, a 547 : report, 715, 
753 

Double windows for Council Chamber, order rejected, a 619 
Public Institutions — 

Opinion of City Solicitor requested on power of directors to fix 
salaries, c 10, a 17 

Manufacture of chain cables, referred, a 111, c 116; report, 

a 129, c 136; order passed, a 151; c 155: rejected, 170, 

190; reconsideration, discussion, charges of bribery, iuves- 

itton, e 210, a 227, c 246, a 251, c 286: order rejected, c 292 

Salaries of employes, ordinance referred, c 106, a 109; report, 
ordinance passed, c 122, a 126 

liency of removing House of Correction referred, c 248; 
Indefinitely postponed, a 251 

Annual report, a 357 

Long Island for House of Correction, order offered, c 302 ; re- 
ferred, c 810, a 819, 0,828; a 888 

Care of Lunatics, message, a 380 ; referred, a 465, c 467 ; report, 
a 050, 075, 720, c 737, 767, 770, a 780 

dieney of leasing Old State Piison for House of Correction, 
referred, c 37'J ; indefinitely postponed, a 

Oars of neglected children, a 448, c 451 

Inspection of Prisons — see County of Suffolk 

Members of Committee authorized to visit, c 541; indefinitely 
postponed, a 564 

Investigating Committee, order offered, c 580; passed, c691, a 
a 711 ; Indefinitely postponed, a 711 

Board of Directors requested to furnish quarterly reports, c 777, 

a 7SI I 
The Pauper Dead — tee l'oor 
Public Lands — 

Annual report of Superintendent, c 22 

Committee to take possession of estates, c 3, a 26 

Win. Corbett^Bhange authorized, a 20, c 22 

Charles Rfheinlfardt, change authorized, a 70, c 73 

Notice to mortgagees, expediency referred, c 1S2; report, c 443 

Mortgage discharged, on petition of J. J. Clapp, a 288 

Church, Suffolk, and Northampton street claims, referred, with 

full powers, c 315, a 318 
Ordinance authorizing acknowledgments, referred, c 315, a 319; 

report, c 443, a 489. 520 
Order confirming acknowledgments, c 316, a 319, 398, c 451, 

a 4s9 
Confirmatory deed to Aaron H. Allen, c 476, a 483 
Several bonds cancelled, a 514, c 520, a 655, c 663, a 758, c 765, 

772 
Land near Police Station Eight, custody transferred to Police 

Commissioners, a 568, c 575 
Public Library — 

Incorporating Trustees, report, order passed to petition, c 04, 

a 68; amendments to ordinance referred, a 186, c 187; 

report, a 229 ; ordinance passed, a 257, c 282 
South Boston lirauch, report on lease of rooms, referred, c 191, 

a 194 ; report, recommitted, a 251, c 258 ; report, c 378, 390; 

lease authorized, c 477, a 483 
Ventilation, referred, c 284, a 287 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XIII 



East Boston Branch, necessity of repairs, referred, c 356, a 357 

Presentation from G. F. Hammond, referred, c 456 

Annual report, a 490 

Bonds of special police, request referred, c 636, a 638 ; report, 

c668 
Public Parks — 

Annual report of Park Commissioners, a 28 

Salary of clerk, a 28, c 30, 46, 60, a 68 

Cession of Charles-river flats, report, a 54 ; order passed, a 67 ; 

laid on table, c 73 ; passed, c 91 
Nursery at Austin Farm, referred, a 183, c 187; report, c 443, 

a 446, c 456, 467, 478, a 483 
Back Bay Park — more land, c 46, a 54, 64, c 75, a 85 

petition for improving, referred, a 37 

$25,000 for filling, c 34, a 37, c 46, c 123 

delay of work, order of inquiry, c 93, a 95 ; report, a 110, 

cll6 

Loan for improving, a 112, c 116, 125, 137, c 164, 181 

Price for filling, resolve referred, c 123, a 126 ; report, 

c 165, a 168 

Order of inquiry, c 226, a 227, c 314 

$25,000 additional appropriation, a 320, c 328, a 350, 361, 

384,401,406, c 407, a 446 

Surface grading by loam from water basins, a 386, c 389 

report, request for $25,000 referred, a 516, c 520 ; report 
a 526, 528 ; indefinitely postponed, a 698 
Jamaica Pond for a park, petitions referred, a 305, c 308, 

a 318 
Horatio Harris estate, order offered, c 302, indefinitely post- 
poned, c 311 
Orchard Park, order for enlarging rejected, c 315 
Eecord Commissioners — 

Third Report, a 723 
Registration of voters — see also Printing, also Taxes — 

$3,700 additional appropriation, c 596, a 600, c 601, a 604, 

c612 
Rewards — 

S500 for murderer of James II. Daley, c 91, a 95 
Richardson, Ward 10 — remarks : 
Roxbury Caual, 5, 12, 433, 453 
Finance Committee, 6 
Free soup. 24 
Public Baths, 25, 35, 94 
Nuisance in Charlestown, 30, 63 
Contracts involving employment of labor, 43 
Petition for aid by laborers, 45 
Harbor Master, 73 
Police Commission, 76, 330 

Official term of members of city government, 92 
Sale and purchase of ferry-boats, 104 
Management of public grounds, 118, 123, 219 
Mass. Charitable Mechanic Exhibition, 142 
Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 180, 190, 212, 233 
Appropriation Bill, 164 
Tax titles, 182 

School-house, Allston District, 182 
South Boston Branch Library, 192, 394, 477 
Improved Sewerage, 222 
Requiring employes to be residents, 242 
Additional Water Appropriation, 298 
Special Election in Ward 10, 300 
Claims of West Roxbury Laborers, 301 
Trustee of City Hospital, 309, 328 
Alterations of the Records, 311 
Director of East Boston Ferries, 313 
Premiums on Loans, 316 
Fourth of July, 314 
Huntington ave., 329 
Sewer and Sidewalk Assessments, 315 
Fourth of July, 335 
Seventeenth of June, 368 
Visit to Sudbury river, 370 
Salaries of Police Commissioners, 371 
Music on Common, 377, 390, 476, 478 
Bathing Department, 396 
Summer vacation, 422 
Powers of Police Commissioners, 468 
Back Bay park, 520 
New Court-House, 539 
Liquor Licenses, 561 
East Boston Ferries, legal fees, 576 
Unlicensed sale of lager beer and cider, 581, 595 
Duties of Street Commissioners, 599 
Back fees to Deputy Collectors, 612 
Dissection of dead bodies, 617 
East Chester Park, 070, 689 
Stony Brook, 689 

Extra services in Collector's Department, 703 
. Non-resident employes, 706 
Transfer of Insane, 741, 770 
Annual dinner, 746 
Election of Street Commissioner, 765 
East Chester Park bridge, 773 
Richardson, Ward 11 — remarks : 
Joint Rules and Orders, 13 
Police Commission, 60 
Mill Pond Flats, 63 
Appropriation Bill, 160 



South Boston Branch Library, 192 

Interest to be charged upon tax, 189 

Duty of Fire Commissioners, 285 

Seventeenth of June, 368 

Music on Common, 377 

Non-resident employes, 709 

Strike at Grand Junction Wharf, 774 

Pensioned Policemen , 774 
Robinson, Alderman — remarks : 

Payment of Mr. Winship's bill, 203 

Taking birds for scientific purposes, 401 

Paving Warren street, Charlestown, 572 

Protection of Lake Cochituate, 653 

Northampton Street District, 655 

New Court House, 721 

Non-resident employes, 761 

Board of Public Works, 764 
Rosnosky, Ward 16 — remarks: 

Free soup, 24 

Classification of voters, 36 

Accounts of Water Board, 74 

Police Commission, 80, 334 

Work on Back Bay Park, 93 

Public Baths, 106 

Management of public grounds, 119 

Appropriation Bill, 160 

Employes on public grounds, 218, 222 

Confirmation of Water Commissioner, 282 

Duty of Fire Commissioners, 285 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 309, 375, 457 

Trustee of City Hospital, 309 

Director East Boston Ferries, 312 

Proposed visit to Sudbury river, 352, 369, 379 

Music on Common, 377 

Proposed abolition of certain commissions, 395, 452 

Roxbury Canal, 437 

Playgrounds, 442 

Powers of Police Commissioners, 457, 473 

Fourth of July Regatta, 458 

South Boston Branch Library, 477 

Salaries of Police Force, 476 

Summer Concerts, 476 

Improved Sewerage, modifying contracts, 511 

Painting office of Superintendent of Common, 522 

Right of visit to Public Institutions, 542, 694 

Drake's History of Roxbury, 597 

Back fees to Deputy Collectors, 613 

Dissection of Dead bodies, 617 

East Chester Park, 630 

Street Commissioners, 632, 674 

Transfer of $1,800 to Law Department, 684 

Non-resident employes, 710 

Annual dinner, 746 

Pensioned Policemen, 748, 774 

Police distribution of Documents, 749 

Election of Street Commissioner, 765 

Proposed contract for plants, 766 

Director for Public Institutions, 766 

Transfer of the Insane, 770 
Roxbury Canal — 

Abating nuisance, c 3, a 40, c 164, 182, a 1S3, 305, 402, c 432, 
444, 452, a 460 

Order passed to obtain City Solicitor's opinion, c 5 ; substitute 
order passed, a 8, c 12 

Arrangement to visit, c 445 
Rules and Orders — 

Of Aldermen — of 1877, adopted, 1 ; committee, 1 ; report, 8 

Of Council — of 1877, adopted, 2; committee, 2; report, 5; 
adopted, 16 

Joint — of 1877, adopted, a 1, c 2 ; committee, a 1, c 2 ; report, 
c 4 ; adopted, c 12, 14, a 17, c 23, a 27 

Pocket edition authorized, c 3, a 8 

Secrecy of Committee Proceedings referred, c 5, a 8 ; report, in- 
expedient, c 23, a 26 

Carriage-hire, report, c 164, a 168 

Mistakes in Ballots, order referred, c 285 

Notice of public hearings, order referred, c 315, a 31S 
Rust, Ward 18 — remarks: 

Classification of voters, 35 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 75 

Salaries — 

Employes residing in city — see City Laborers 

Report of Committee on Salaries, a 19S; orders passed, a 230, c 

238, 259, a 273 
Of Police and Police Commissioners, order to report ordinance, 

a 305, c 30S, 329 ; report, order passed, a 347, c 351, 370, 

379, 456, 475, 477, a 485 
Of Supt. of N. Beacon st. Bridge and Western avenue Bridge, 

a 306, c 328 
Salaries of ward officers, order referred, a 491, c 520; report 

order passed, a 593, c 595, 600 
Salary of Iuspector of Milk, a 497 
Superintendent of Ferries, request of Directors for reduction of 

salary referred, a 547 ; report, a 593, c 595 
Probation officer, County of Suffolk, communication of Mayor 

referred, a 5S2, c 595 ; order passed, a 605, 625, c 628, c 672 ; 

substitute passed, c 690, a 696 



XIV 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Sampson, Ward 17 — remarks: 
Bade 
Finance Committee, 6 

Free soup, 24 

Public Baths, 34, 10.', 

Contracts Involving the employment of labor, 12 

Petition for aid ; -, 15 

Police Commission, 64, BO 

Mass. Charitable Mechanic Exhibition, 103, 141 

Salaries of employes in public institutions, 106 

Police Belts, 122 " 

Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 135, 155, 17<'>, 190, 

210, 286, 296 
Superintendent of Public Grounds, 136 
Loan for Back Bay Park, 140, 104 
Superintendents of Bridges, 1C>.'> 
Appropriation Bill, 168, 172 
Roxburj Canal, 164, 45;! 
School appropriations and transfers, 156 
Interest to be charged upon tax, 188 

roved sewerage, 222 
Harbor Blaster, 224 
Additional water supply appropriations, 225, 226, 2C1, 273, 

2'JS 
Salary Bill,2G0 
Special Election in Ward in. S 
Alterations of the Record 

Trustee of City Hospital 

Director Bast Boston Ferries, 313 

Fourth of July, 313 

Premiums on loins, 316 

South Boston Branch Library, 304, 477 

Sale of fern boat " General Grant," 

Police Commissionei 

English High and Latin School roof, 413 

Summer vacation, 122 

Prison Point Plats, 454 

Care of lunatics, 467 

Fa<t Boston Perries, legal fees, 688, 666 
i of visit to Public Institutions, 542 

Back fees to Di putj -. 612 

Bast Cluster Park, 628, 690 

Pay of laborers before Thanksgiving, G64 

Transfer $1,800 to Law Department 

Transfer of Insane, 739, 767 

Proposed contract for plants, 766 

Director for Public institutions, 766 

Fast Chester-park bridge, 772 
Sampson, Ward IS — remarks: 

New Court-House, 540 

Hack fees to Deputy Collectors, 613 

Non-resident employes, 710 
Santrv, Ward 10 — remarks: 

Superintendents of Bridges, 187, 154 
Sawyer, Ward IS — remarks: 

Army and Navy Memorial, 171 

Drake's History of Roxbury, 697 
Sawyer, Ward 24 — remarks : 

Public baths, 105 

Manufacture of chain cables, 155 
Schools — 

East Boston Branch High School, request from School Com- 
mittee, referred, e 64 ; report, c 122, a 126 

Chapman School-house, request for repairs, referred, c 64, a 68 ; 
report, c 122, a 126 

additional appropriation, c 87, 105 

Request referred for new School-house on I'olk street, c 88 ; re- 
port, order passe,), c 122, a 126. a 323. C 352 

Fire-escapes from High-School buildings, report referred, c 89 ,a 95 

Order ofinquiry passed, c 121, a 126 

Vacation Bchools, request referred, c 121, a 126, c 378, a 384 

Powers of School Committee to spend money — order to petition 
referred, c 123, a 126 

Allston District, order to erect school-house, c 182, 187, a 194 
ion square school-house lot, sewer assessment assumed, 
a 186, c 224 

Hillside school-house, expediency of purchasing land, referred, 
c 226, a 227 

Common street school-house — sec Public Buildings 

Mason street, request for paving, referred, c 247, n 250 

Dwight School-building, request for office for master, referred, 
c 299, a 303 ; report referred, c 3'i8, a 384 

Frothiugham School-house, request for alteration of tablet, re- 
ferred, c 300, a 303 ; report, c 314, 328, a 338 

Emerson School, request for change of tablet referred, c 329, 
a 338, 384 

Vacancies in School Committee, a 338, 525 

Concord-st. Primary School-house, request for alterations in 
outbuildings, referred, c 300, a 303 ; report, c 378, a 384 

Eliot School, request to provide office for master, referred, c 377, 
a 884 ; alterations authorized, c 476, a 483 

High and Latin School-building, fire-proofing roof, c 378, a 384, 
c 389, 413, a 427 

Harrison School-house tablet, c 378 

Hancock School, request for repairs, referred, c 443, a 446; re- 
pairs authorized, e 476, a 483 

Bunker Hill, request for radiators, referred, c 454, a 460 ; report, 
c 476, a 483 



Lawrence, request for repair of furniture, referred, c 154, a 460 : 

repairs authorized, c 47'i, a 483 
Wells School, request for replacing of outbuildings, referred, 

c 454, a 460 ; authorized, e 47'i, a 488 
Secretary's room. Mason street, request for extension, referred, 

c 454, a 460 ; report, c 476, a 483 
chapman School-house, change of heating apparatus, c 476, 

a 488 
Everett School-house, request for speaking tubes ami. bells, 

referred, c 523, a .",25 
Brighton Grammar School-house, heating, ventilating, furnish- 
ing, referred, c 523, a 525 ; authorized, a 531, c 538. 
Request for ward room, Ma.-on street, referred, c 690, a 696; 
order passed, c 776, a 780 
Seventeenth of June — 

Order offered, c 122 ; passed, committee appointed, C 156,' a 168 
Order to display Sags and close City Hall, a 363, c 368 
Invitation accepted, c 377 
Sewers — see also Improved Sewerage 

Additional appropriation, a 20, c 22, a 2S 

Annual report of Superintendent, a 28 

Taking land of Boston & Albany Railroad, a 351 

Taking lands at Dorchester, a .'SI 

Assessments, acceptance of Act, referred, c 314. a 31S : report, 

referred, e 443, a 44'",, <■ -Is*, 520, a 525, c 674, a 676 
Dorchester Sewers, hearing, a 336 

Order passed to pay assessment from Gibson School Fund, b 
498, e 521) ; petition from School Committee, referred, c 578, 
a 582; report, e '169 a 675 
Ward street, communication from Board of Health referred, a 

513. 
Sheridan avenue and Terrace street, hearing, a 591; taking 
laud, a 600 

er to take land in Band street, 641 
Expediency of placing Sewer Department in charge of City 

Bngini er, order referred, c 696; laid on table, a 096 
$ 15,000 additional appropriation, a 698, o 703, a 712, c 773 
Order to construct in Winter street, a 111 

Oak street, Charlestown, a 148 
Cottage street, Charlestown, a 148 
" tin .290,344 

" Washington street, 290, 344 

" Onion avenue, 290, 844 

" Canton street, 325 

" Gardner and other streets, Brighton, 351 

Commercial street, Dorchester, 400 
Hancock street, Dorchester, 400 
Trull street, Dorchester, 400 
Glen street, Dorchester, 400 
" Adams sheet, Dorchester, 400 

Brewer street. 1 is 
Foss street, Charlestown, 465 
Arlington avenue, Charlestown, 465 
" Wyoming street, 498 

" Dickens street, 408 

" Middlesex street, Charlestown, 506 

it street, W. Roxbury, 516 

Saratoga street, Fast Boston, 516 
Moore street, East Boston, 510 

" Mat I r, Kn st Boston, 526 

" Hereford street, 526 

" Dalton street. 526 

Canal street, Charlestown, 534 

" Mill street, Dorchester, 566 

" Jamaica street, 566 

" Woodman street, 566 

" Greenwich street, 589 

" Faxon street, 589 

" M street, a 600 

" Sheridan avenue, 600 

•' Terrace avenue, 600 

" Hnnneman avenue, 605 

" Hand street. 641 

" Concord street, Charlestown, 663 

Shepard, Ward 1 — remarks : 
Police Commission, 73, 331 
Loan tor publfc park, 138 

Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 178, 295 
Director Fast Boston Ferries, 201 
Proposed purchase of Long Island, 310 
South Boston Branch Library, 300 
Proposed abolition of certain commissions, 394 
Sale of ferry-boat " General Grant," 396 
Powers of Police Commissioners, 467 
Salaries of Police Force, 475 
Settlement of betterments, 522 
East Boston Ferries, legal fees, 675 
Duties of Street Commissioners, 599, 633, 637, 674 
Dissection of dead bodies, 617 
Water Supply for East Boston, 618, 620, 635 
Non-resident employes, 710 
Sibley, Ward 5 — remarks : 
Roxbury Canal, 12 
Free soup, 24 

Joint rules and orders, 13, 14 
Nuisance in Charlestown, 30, 46, 63 
Police Commission, 58 
Superintendent of Public Grounds, 61. 136 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XV 



Management of public grounds, 90, 107 


Regulation of horse-car travel, report— see Metropolitan R.R. 


Salaries of employes in public institutions, 107 


Co.; also 722, 723, 731 


Manufacture of chain cables, 155, 178, 286, 294 


Location in Brattle street granted, 723 ; accepted, 727 


Appropriation Bill, 159, 173 


Evening cars, via Cornhill, 753 


Employes on public grounds, 217 


Spaulding (Alderman ) — 


Police Commissioners, 413, 469 


Elected and qualified, 336 


Grading Monument Hill, 421 


On macadamizing Adams street, 572 


Prison Point Flats, 454 


Commercial-street widening, 602 


Ballground on Common, 458 


South Boston Lunatic Hospital, 726 


Summer Concerts, 476 


New Court House, 734 


Improved Sewerage, modifying contracts, 511 


Non-resident employes, 754, 761 


Drake's History of Roxbury, 598 


Spencele.y, Ward 19 — remarks : 


Lease of building on Warren-street bridge, 684 


Documents for members City Council, 5 


Public Institutions, investigation, c 692 


Joint rules and orders, 13 


Non-resident employes, 710 


Second edition Army and Navy Monument Memorial, 15 


Transfer of the Insane, 768 


Terms of members City Council, and salaries, 15 


Sinking Funds — 


Free soup, 23 


Appropriations required, a 53 


Nuisance in Charlestown, 30 


Annual report, a 304 


Classification of voters, 36 


Slade, Alderman — remarks : 


Contracts involving employment of labor, 43 


Refreshments, etc., 17 


Personal explanation, 44 


Contracts involving employment of laborers, 39 


Petition for aid by laborers, 45 


Police Commission, 62 


Police Commission, 58, 75 


Cambridge Bridges, 71 


Harbor Master, 73, 156, 222 


Placing public grounds in care of Park Commissioners, 83 


Management of public grounds, 87, 91, 118, 123 


Loan for improving parks, 113 


Work on Back Bay Park, 93, 124 


Cost of public instruction, 126 


Mass. Charitable Mechanic Exhibition, 104, 141 


Telegraph poles in Brighton, 149 


Public Baths, 106 


Directors of public institutions, 185 


Appropriation for public instruction, 121 


BUI of H. A. Winship, 185, 203 


Police Belts, 122 


Appropriation Bill, 196 


Unsafe buildings, 152 


Employes on public grounds, 202, 205 


Superintendents of Bridges, 152 


Pay of lamplighters, 205 


Appropriation Bill, 160 


Improved Sewerage, 208 


Roxbury Canal, 164 


Decoration Day, 209 


Fire Commissioner, 172 


Salary Bill, 231 


Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 181 


Mercantile Wharf Market, 235 


Tax titles, 182 


Temporary building on Common, 253 


School-house, Allston District, 182, 187 


Pollution of Lake Cochituate, 256 


Interest to be charged upon tax. 188 


Director Public Institutions, 307 


South Boston Branch Library, 191, 378, 391, 477 


Decoration Day, 319 


Labor on public grounds, 219 


Special Election for Alderman, 319 


Retaining money due contractors, 238 


Paving North Market street, 324 


Directors of public institutions. 239 


Custody of Eastern-ave. wharf, 336, 344 


Requiring employes to be residents, 243 


Laborers on Improved Sewerage, 345 


Removal of House of Correction, 248 


Salaries of Police Commissioners, 348 


Trustee of City Hospital, 277, 309 


New Boiler-house at Jail, 350 


Additional Water Supply Appropriation, 282 


Foot bridge at D street, over O.C. Railroad, 364 


Confirmation of Water Commissioner, 283 


Vacation Schools, 384 


Salaries of Police Commissioners, 308, 457 


Mass. College of Pharmacy, 385 


Alterations of the Records, 311 


Paving Frothingham ave. , Charlestown, 387 


Public Parks, 314 


Railroad tracks on Causeway street, 399 


Ungraded Streets, 369 


Taking of birds for scientific purposes, 400 


Music on Common, 376, 390, 478 


Back Bay Park, 406 


Bathing Department, 396 


Fitchburg Railroad connection with Union Freight Railroad, 


Harbor Police, 396 


429 


Back Bay Park, 407, 521 


Concert Garden in West Roxbury, 450 


English High and Latin School roof, 414 


Prison Point Flats, 460 


Duties of Commissioners, 452 


South Boston Branch Library, 483 


Powers of Police Commissioners, 458, 467 


Powers of Police Commission, 483 


Fourth of July Regatta, 458 


Paving Columbus ave., 488 


Director for Public Institutions, 454 


Columbus avenue horse-car controversy, 492, 498 


Salaries of Police force, 475 


Regulation of horse-car travel, 496, 507, 550, 606, 626, 644, 661, 


Improved Sewerage, modifying contract, 510 


698, 732 


Painting office of Sup't Common, 522 


Highland Railway, temporary tracks, 517 


Right of visit to Public Institutions, 543, 693 


New Court House, 518, 534, 642, 718, 733 


Brighton Grammar school-house, 538 


Polling-places, 526 


East Boston Ferries, fees for legal services, 662, 6S6 


Cazenove place, 531 


Dissection of dead bodies, 580, 617 


Voting-places, 559 


"Siege of Paris," 581 


Election expenses, 559 


Drake's History of Roxbury, 598 


Polling-place for Precinct Four, "Ward Eight, 570 


Back fees to Deputy Collectors, 013 


Paving Warren street, Charlestown, 671 


Water Supply for East Boston, 618 


Macadamizing Adams street, 572 


Voting precincts in Wards 23, 24, and 25, 620 


Use of Mayhew School-house for homeless wanderers, 592, 601 


East Chester Park, 631 


Sudbury River Conduit, 610 


Salary of Probation Officer, 690 


Commercial-street widening, 640 


Transfer of Insane, 743, 771 


Pay of laborers before Thanksgiving, 647 


Strike at Grand Junction Wharf, 774 


South Boston R. R., tracks over Dover-street bridge, 061 


State Aid — 


Purchase of gravel bank at Watertown, 681 


Committee, c 2 


Free use of Faneuil Hall, 715 


Appointment of Paymaster and clerical assistance authorized, c 3 


Reduction of Market rents, 717 


Quarterly report of Paymaster, a 10, 168, 427, 556. T.'iS 


Non-resident employes, 760 


Supplementary order passed, a 342 


Smith, Ward 9 — remarks : 


Payments charged to Soldiers' Relief, a 402, c 432 


Classification of voters, 36 


Report, order to petition, passed, a 713, c 737 


Management of public grounds, 123 


Stehbins, Alderman — 


Appropriation Bill, 160 


Elected chairman, 1 


Fourth of July Regatta, 459 


Remarks : TJncollectable taxes, 11 


Soup for the poor — 


Claims of West Roxbury laborers. 130 


Order passed, c 23, a 26 ; report, a 184 


Member of Boston Water Board, 255 


Order offered, c 636 ; passed, c 672, a 675 


Pollution of Lake Cochituate, 256 


South Boston R.R. Co. — 


Death of Alderman Perkins, 275 


Hearing for location over Dover-st. bridge, etc., 81 ; report, 


Regulation of horse-car travel, 606, 626, 644, 699 


128, 149 


Sudbury River Conduit, 610 


Notices of hearings, a 626 ; hearing, 711 


Back pay to Deputy Collectors, 646 


Location over Dover-street bridge to Park square, hearing, 658 : 


Pay of laborers before Thanksgiving, 647 


order of notice and resolve passed, 661; order reported, 


Commercial-street widening, 653 


753 ; passed, 757 


South Boston R. R. tracks over Dover-Stn 


Location on East Eighth street, granted, 526 : accepted, 547 


Leave of absence to City Physician, 71". 



XVI 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Free use of Faneuil Hall 71~> 
Extra pay for policemen, 710 
New Court House, 721 

Improved Sewerage, and East Chester Park. 72^ 
Street Commissioners — 

Annual report of Commissioners, c 18 

Heath of Joseph Smith, a 763, c 705 

Election of Newton Talbot, a 753, c 765 

Abolition of Streer [on, c 394,443, 451, 4a8, a 460, c 581 

590, 615, 632, 636, 672, a 675, 764 
Stonv lirook Improvement — 

Joint Special Committee to take charge, c 3 

Diversion of Muddy lirook, petition referred, a 96 ; oommun 

tion from Brookline committee referred, c 152, a 168; n 

referred to next city government, c 708, a 711 
Boston Belting Co., order to petition passed, o 125, a 12 

c 663, 674, 686 
Streets — 

Superintendent authorized to remove structures on Bidewalks, 

grant permits to open streets, number streets, pun 

horses an, 1 supplies, furnish and - 

walks, erect fences, lay crosswalks, and pave gutters, a 20 
"West Chester Park, expediency of changing line referred, a '-1 
Names of streets, expi diencj of revising, referred, a 21 
Laving out private streets, referred, c 25, 
Removing bridge on Parker St., a 28 
Committee authorized to refer claims to arbitration 
Hereford st, extension, referred, c 82, a 87 ; report , order passed, 

c 64, a 68. 85 
Removal of obstructions, order offered, a il; passed, a 88 
In Roxbury, sprinkling, 
In Brighton, sprinkling, 111 
Annual reporl of Superintendent, a 146 
Teleirranh poles in Brighton, a L49 

Ktosprink 1,280,252 

fruit-stands in streets, order referred, a 148; report, order, 

Obsti >rder to enforce ordinances, a 14S, - j~, 262, 273 

laterials, a 107 
Sprinkling at public expense, report, a 169 
Occupation of Bidewalks, Highlands, report, a 169 
Regulation of I i 229 

BpSnkll realth ave., W. Ch >ark, Huntingto i 

ave.,a280 . „ , _ , 

Sprinkling Chestnut-Hill ave., Cambridi 

ington st., and Western ave., Brighton, o 230 
Sprinkling Beacon st., Brighton ave., and Brookline ai 
Sprinklin •• a 230 

Grade established between Columbia st. and N. T. & H. B. B il 

road, a 2 ,.„...• 

Old road, Dorchester, commu " i: rs, 

refei red, a 287 „,, 

Widening Courtstreet, petition referred, a o2i : report, 11 

pedii „ 

r j elegraph wire authorized on Crescent ave.. a j'-1 
Sidewalk i ee Sewers 

gwett Bti ment of city's claims, a843, c 851 

La, reet, expediency of discontinuing, referred, a ,143, ; 

Post-Of- ton, communication from May or, referred, a 322 

Grading Huntington ave., referred, c 828, a 888 ; ordei 

a a 

tem-ave. wharf— see Ferries 
Abating Betterment Assessments, a 326, 34-" 
Ungraded streets, order to report, c 356, a 35. , c 369 
Foot bridge at D street, over O.C. Railroad, a 868, 884 j 

initely postponed, a 406 
Railroad tracks on ( street, a 398 

Leave to construct brick tunnel under Arch street, a 
Old Colony R.R. Co. authorized to erect 

avenue, a 
Regulation of horse-car travel — fee Metropolitan R.K. I 
Atlantic avenue sea-wall, report of safety, a 506 
Western avenue, Brighton, leave to construct electric telegraph, 

Committee authorized to settle betterment assessments, a 014, 

c 522 
Tudor street , acceptance referred, c 524, a 52a 

prfdening, report of Commissioners, 

referred, a 554, c 561: petition referred, a 51 

ferred, a 569, c 575, a 602; report, a C24 ; order to rea 

Expedience of widening A street, referred, a 684, C 588; report, 
a 024," c 028, 636, a 638, c 669, a 681, 682, 722, 72<, c 744, 
775,776 
Order of notice to quit on Dalton street, 565 
Order of notice to quit on Dearborn street, 5C5 
Cazenove place, $2,500 to W. II. Whitmore, a 531, 549 
Obstructions of sidewalks, ordinance reported, c 641 ; referred, 

c 562, a 564 ; report, c 668, 684, a 690 
West Fourth street, order for widening referred, a 547 ; report, 

order passed, a 569, c 675 ; order to quit, a 689 
Notico of damage, from George Curtis, a 560 
Ward street — see Health, Board of 

East Chester Park extension, report and order from Street 
Commissioners, referred, a 582, c 695; report, referred, a 
624, c 628, 669, 689, a 697, 711, 758, c 773, 776 



Barton court, report, c 599, a 600 

Adams street, order Of notice to quit, 605 

Eastern avenue, report, c 669, a 082 

Obstructions on Kneeland street, a 682, 096, 725, 75S 

rel bank in Watcrtown. 681, TOO, 746 
Coasting on Webster street, 082, 713 
Causeway-street obstructions, referred, a 697 
Ferrin street, order of notice to quit, a 697 
¥2,000 to James Dennie, 752, 757 

— Adams street, grade and macadamize, a 572 

— Albion st., edgestones, gutters, a 252 

— Beacon St., cross-walks, 280 

— Blue Hill avenue, sprinkling, 325 

— Brookline avenue, sprinkling, 274 

— Brewster street, gutters, edgestonos, sidewalks, 364 

— Butterfield avenue, named, 325 

— Cambridge street, Charlestown, sprinkling, 324 

— Cambridge street, Charlestown, license to water, a 363 

— Caw street, cross-walk, 526 

— Chapman Street, pave, macadamize, edgestones, sidewalks, 4^ 

alsea street, Charlestown, transfer of three telcgraphpoles, 51 , 

t in a avenue, grade, edgestones, gutters, 290 
iinan park, grading, edgestones, gutters, 693 

— Columbia street, Dorchester, grade, 324 

— Columbia street, establish grade, 824 

— Coliin lie, paving, 488 

— Commercial, Park, Mill, and Beach streets, Dorchester, spnnk 

ling, 428 

5e, Host. ,n, and Humphrey streets, sprinkling, 363 

— Curtis street, named, 387 

— Dorchester avenue, sprinkling, 428 

— Dudley Street, .sprinkling, 325 

— Dudley ami Stetson streets, sprinkling, 363 

itl'i street, edgestones, gutters, 304 
- Elm street , aes, gutters. 289 

— Everett a\ e. tiers, roadway, sidewalks, 2o2 

— Faxon sti and gravel, 506 

— Fay street, edgestones, sidewalks, a 348 

— Frothingham avenue, Charlestown, paving, grading, 3S7 

i gia street, cross-walk , 526 

— Q teen street, edgestones. 

— (irecuon; I , edgestones, gutters. . 

— Harrison avenue, sprinkling, 402 

— Hathorn square, named. 280 

— Highland sheet, Bprinkllng, 290 

len row, Charlestown, named, 109 

— Huntington avenue, grade, macadamize, 306, 107 

— I SI 

— Lamartine street, edgestones, gutters, 239 

, gutters, 462 

— - Lincoln Park, bricl 

trees, : ■ tters, 230 

— Main street, Charlestown, pave, 306 

D street, notice to Middlesex R.R. to pave, 387 

— Meridian street, edgestones, 641 

— Michigan avenue, edgestones, gutters, 271 

— Mill street, Di grade, gravel, a b'43 

— Minot street, paving, 888 

— Murray avenue named, a'531, 546 

— Ninth street, edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, 

grading, etc., 28 

— So. Market street, paving, 

— No. Beacon street, Brighton, macadamize, a 343 

— Northampton street, paving, a 363 

— P street, edgestones, 681 

— Park square, paving, 230 

u, paving, 387 

— rarker street, grade, fences, walls, 307 

— Putnam street, East Boston, edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, o48 

— Quince St., edgestones, gutters, 230 

— River st. i , grading and macadamizing, a 262 
Riverside street, street crossing, 520 

— Roxbury street, sprinkling, 324 

— Kuggles street, grading, 29 

therford avenue, named, 325 
boo] street* , 289 

— Shawmut avenue, paving, 274 

— Bhawmut avenue, notice to Highland II. H. to pave, 3Si __ 

n street, Charlestown, edg dewalks, paving, 38. 

— Stevens street, edgestones, gutters, sidewalks, 517 

— Sudbury street, paving, 304 

— Sumner street, East Boston, sidewalks, 548 

— Thomas street, pave sidewalks, 363 

— Thomas park, named, 887 

— Trcmont, Cabot, and others, sprinkling, 387 

I — Tudor street, edgestones, Bidewalks, gutters, a 492 

— \\ all street, paving, 388, 389 

! — AValnut avenue, sprinkling, 325 

— Walnut avenue, leave to lay iron pipe, 306 

— Warren street, sprinkling, 325 

— Warren street, Charlestown, paving, a 571 

— Washington street, sprinkling, 274 

— Webster street, gutters, macadamize, edgestones, a 572 

— 'Western avenue, Brighton, macadamize, a 571 

— West Walnut park, edgestones, gutters, grade, and gravel, 388 
I — White street, grade established, 289 

! — Wiggin street, named, 230 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XVII 



— Willow street, West Roxbury, grade, gravel, 324 
Summer Vacation — 

Board of Aldermen, 429 

Common Council, 407, 441, 454, 459, 477 
Sumner, Charles — 

Acceptance of statue, a 757, c 765 

Taxes — see heading Auditor of Accounts, item Estimates 

Act in relation to collection of taxes, request to report ordi- 
nance, a 325, c 328 
Thompson, Ward 9 — remarks : 

Joint rules and orders, 12 

Free soup, 24 

Public Baths, 25, 34 

Classification of voters, 35 

Contracts involving employment of labor, 44 

Petition for aid by laborers, 45 

Mill Pond flats, 46 

Police Commission, 58, 76, 330 

Superintendent of Public Grounds, 60 

Management of public grounds, 87, 89, 108, 118, 123 

Police Belts, 91 

Charles-river embankments, 91 

Work on Back Bay Park, 93, 124 

Loans for park purposes, 116, 138 

Police belts. 122 

Supt's of Bridges, 137 

Mass. Char. Mechanic Exhibition, 143, 176 

Fire Commissioner, 172 

Appropriation Bill, 173 

Tax titles, 182 

Interest to be charged upon tax, 1S9 

Purchases of city supplies, 192 

Chain-cable factory at House of Correction, 212, 296 

Decoration Day, 213 

Employes on public grounds, 217, 222 

Harbor Master, 224 

Additional water-supply appropriations, 225, 281, 298 

Employes on new park, 226 

Requiring employes to be residents, 260, 745 

Confirmation of Water Commissioner, 284 

Duty of Fire Commissioners, 285 

Director East Boston Ferries, 291, 312 

Special election in Ward 10, 300 

Claims of West Roxbury laborers, 301 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 308 

Public Parks, 314 

Trustee of City Hospital, 309 

Premiums on loans, 316 

Fourth of July, 335 

South Boston Branch Library, 390 

Proposed abolition of certain commissions, 395 

Sale of ferry-boat " General Grant," 395 

Bathing Department, 396 

Harbor Police, 396 

Back Bay Park, 407, 520 

Police Commissioners, 410 

Summer vacation, 422 

English High and Latin School building, 414 

Painting office of Sup't Common, 523 

Notices of Committee meetings, 563 

West Fourth-street widening, 575 

Committee on Police Dep't, 577 

"Siege of Paris," 581 

East Chester Park, 629 

Voting precincts Wards 23, 24, and 25, 635 

Street Commissioners, 636 

East Boston Ferries, legal fees, 665, 684 

Lease of building on Warren-street Bridge, 684 

Transfer of $1,800 to Law Department, 684 

Stony Brook, 688 

Public Institutions, investigation, 693 

Transfer of Insane, 741 

Annual dinner, 746 

Pensioned policemen, 748, 774 

Police distribution of documents, 749 

Election of Street Commissioner, 766 

Proposed contract for plants, 766, 777 

Strike at Grand Junction Wharf, 773 
Thorndike, Ward 2 — remarks : 

Police Commission, 79 

Roxbury Canal, 432 

East Chester Park, 628, 669 
Toppan, Ward 3 — remarks : 

City employes, 25, 239 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 374 

Salary of Probation Officer, 628 
Treasury Department — 

Annual report of Treasurer, referred, c 300, a 303 ; report, c 
378, a 384 
Tress —— • 

Removals authorized, a 38, 197, 275, 428, 488, 525, 593, 605, 701 
Truant Officers — see City officers 

Unfinished business — 

Standing Committees directed to resume, c 3, a 8, 21 
Referred to next City Government — 
Diversion of Muddy river, o 703, a 711 



Petition to obtain Long Island for House of Correction, c 747 ; 

a 750 
Board of Public Works, a 764, c 772 
Licensing pool and sippio tables, a 758, c 772, a 780 
Increase of Department hours, a 764, c 772, a 780 
Pensioned Policemen, c 774, a 780 
Dissection of dead bodies, c 775, a 780 
Skating on Public Garden, c 777, a 780 
Ail unfinished business in hands of committees, c 777, a 780, 

781 
Referred to next Board of Aldermen — [732 

Metropolitan R. Co., removal of tracks in Harison avenue, 
Union Freight R.R. Co. — 

Location to Constitution wharf, a 289 j accepted, a 321 

Viles, Alderman — remarks : 

Refreshments and carriage-hire, 17, 27 
Soup, 26 

Police Commission, 38, 51 
Cession of Charles-river flats, 55 
Harbor Master, 67, 289 
Removal of obstructions from the streets, 71 
Sale of ferry-boat, 83 

Placing public grounds in care of Park Commissioners, 85 
Labor at public institutions, 111, 151 
Loan for improving parks, 113 
Claims of West Roxbury laborers, 130 
Tablet on Christ Church, 151 
Street obstructions, enforcing ordinances, 167 
Bill of H. A. Winship, 185 
Water Commissioner, 1S6 
Pay to a disabled fireman, 186 
Appropriation Bill, 195 
Special election in Ward 10, 198 
Employes on public grounds, 206 
Salary Bill, 231 
Mercantile Wharf Market, 236 
Member of Boston Water Board, 255 
Pollution of Lake Cochituate, 257 
Removal of obstructions from public streets, 273 
Special election for Alderman, 319 
Paving North Market street, 324 
Custody of Eastern-avenue wharf, 337, 345 
Discontinuing Lagrange street, 343 
Salaries of Police Commissioners, 348 
Foot-bridge at D street over O.C.R.R., 364 
Old State Prison for House of Correction, 385 
Railroad tracks on Causeway street, 400 
Taking birds for scientific purposes, 400 
Roxbury Canal, 405 
Police Commissioners, 405, 485 
Back Bay Park, 406, 515 
New building for Police Station Six, 406 
Fitchburg R.R., connection with Union Freight R.R., 430 
Prison Point flats, 449, 461 
Concert garden in West Roxbury, 450 
Care of lunatics, 465 
C. M. Dakin's victualler's license, 465 
Disposal of street sweepings and ashes, 446 
Rowing regatta, obstructions, 446 
Construction of sewers, 465 
Powers of Police Commissioners, 485 
Paving Columbus avenue, 488 
Columbus avenue horse-car controversy, 494! 499 
Public urinals, 498, 500 
Meridian-street Bridge, 506 
Regulation of horse-car travel, 509, 552, 609, 699 
Highland Railway, temporary tracks, 517 
Taking possession of lands, 514 
New Court-House, 518, 534, 734 
Pay for fowls killed, 548 
Sudbury-river conduit, 560, 610 
Right of visit to Public Institutions, 565 
Land near Police Station Eight, 568 
Commercial-street wideniug, 569, 602, 624, 638, 654 
Abatement of nuisance assessment, 570 
Macadamizing Adams street, 573 
Sewer assessment on Gibson school fund, 582 
Use of Mayhew School-house for homeless wanderers, 602 
City Stables in Charlestown, 625 
Pay of laborers before Thanksgiving, 647 
East Boston Ferries, reduction of toll, 650 
Election returns, 698 
Extra pay for policemen, 716, 729 
Reductiou of Market rents, 717 
South Boston Lunatic Hospital, 725 
Salaried officers to be residents, 751, 754 
Voting Precincts — see Elections 

Ward, Ward 21 — remarks : 

Work on Back Bay Park, 93 
Supts. of Bridges, 137, 153 
Appropriation Bill, 102 
Roxbury Canal, 440 
Drake's History of Roxbury, 597 
East Boston Ferries, legal fees, 667 
Public Institutions, investigation, 693 
Non-resident employes, 710 



XVIII 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



Wards— [see also Elections] — 

Ward-room for Ward 1, expediency referred, e 34, a 37 

Ward 22, ward-room accommodations, referred, <• 91 

Ward-room for Ward 20, expediency referred, c, 125, a 188 
Washington's Birthday — 

Order to commemorate, c 34, 45, a 53 
Water — 

Request for power to contract referred, 32. a 37 ; report, order 

passed, a 54, 57 
New system of book-keeping, $500 for expert, a 54, c 74 
$600,000 additional appropriation, referred, a 127 ; report, a j",1 , 

169 ; order passed, a 188, c 187. 224 ; order of inquiry pasf« d, 

c 226, a 227 ; report, c 261, 277 ; reconsideration, c 297, 708, 

711 
Pollution of Lake Cochltuate, order to apply for injunction, 

a 25C, c 258, a 273 ; report of City Engineer, referred, ■ 

c595 
1 ncollected bill, order to report, a 257, c 258 ; report, a 2n. 
Use of hydrants for watering streets in outlying districts, 

report, a 323 
Visit to Sudbury river, order offered, c 335 : rejected, c 352 ; 

amended, order offered, 356 30!), 379 

Annual report, Boston Water Hoard, a 
\\ ater for Bast Boston, order to report on quality, c 524, i 
Claims of Charles P. and Caroline T. Clark, order referred, n 

5is ; report, a 548; order passed, a 684; reconsideration, a 

600 : rejected, 
Protection of Lake Cochltuate, communication referred, a 621 

c 628; orders passed, a 853, e 663 
Water Supply for East Uoston, c 618, 620, 685, • : 
Sudbury River supply, additional authority and appropriation 

to Water Hoard, referred, a 640, C 
Webster, Ward 8 — remarks : 
Mill 1'ond tiats. 45 
Accounts of Water Board, T4 

Police Commission. 75, 333 
Management of public grounds, GO, 123 

Belts, 91 
Work on Back Bay Park, 94, 124 
Appropriation for public instruction, 121 
Mass Char. Mech. Exhibition, 141, 176 
Loan for park purposes, 139 
Appropriation Bill. 160 
S. Boston Branch Library, 191 
Labor on public grounds, 217 
Requiring employes to be residents, 244 
Proof of statement in personal explanation, 24S 
Additional water supply appropriation, 280 
Vacancy in Hoard of Kerry Directors, 308 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 808 

Trustee Citj Hospital, 828 

Police Commissioners, 413 

Prison Point Flats, 451 

Dories of Street Commissioners, 451 

Powers of Police Commi , 458, 4G9 

Weights and .Measures — 

Annual report, a 27 
Wheeler, Ward 10 — 

Sworn in, 258 

On Powers of Police Commissioners, 470 

Settlement of betterments, 522 

Salary of Probation Officer, 628,690 

Voting precincts, Wauls 23, 24. and 25, 635 

Street Commissioners, 036 

Non-resident employes, 706 
Wbidden, Alderman — remarks: 

Refreshments and carriage-hire, 17, 27 

Encroachments on sidewalks, 20 

Contracts involving employment of laborers, 89 

New sy.-tc m of bookkeeping for Water Department, 64 

Harbor Mast< r, 67 

-ion of Charles-river flats, 68 

Hereford St. extension, 68 

Removal of obstructions from the streets, 71 

Cambridge Bridges, 71 

Labor at public institutions. 111, 151 

Loan for improving parks, 113 

Cost of public instruction, 120 

Mass. Charitable Mechanic Exhibition, 145, 621 

Telegraph poles ill Brighton, 149 

Street obstructions, enforcing ordinances, 148, 167 

Storage of paving materials, 1G7 

Egleston sq. school-house lot, 186 

Appropriation Bill, 195 

Employes on public grounds, 203, 200 

Improved Sewerage coustructiou, 208, 632 

Decoration Day, 209 

Contracts involving employment of laborers, 227 

Salary Bill, 23" 

\ e to move wooden buildings, 229 

Sprinkling streets, 230 

Temporary building on Common, 254 

Member of Boston Water Board, 255 

Removal of obstructions from Public Streets 273 

Printing Auditor's Annual Report, 290 

Director East Boston Ferries, 290 

Unsafe Public Buildings, 307, 323 



Special election for alderman, 319 

Improved Sewerage, 320, 307 

East Boston Kerry avenues, 325, 450 

Paving North Market street, 324 

Horse-ear blockades, 326, 383 , 750 

Abating betterment assessments, 326 

Swett street, 343 

Discontinuing Lagrange street. 343 

Custody Eastern -avenue wharf, 344 

Laborers on Improved Sewerage, 345 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 347 

Foot-bridge at D street, over O.C.R.R., 363, 384 

Paving Sudbury street, 364 

Bridge over R.R. at Dartmouth street, 365 

Paving Frothingham avenue, Charlestown, 387 

Grading Huntington avenue, 898 

Railroad tracks on Causeway street, 399 

Hack Bay Park, 402, 516 

Free Ferries on Fourth of July, 402 

Roxbury Canal, 403 

New building for Station Six, 406 

Fltchburg R.R. in connection with Union Freight R.R., 430 

Prison Point Flats, 449 

Concert garden in West Roxbury, 450 

Powers of Police Commission, 484 

Indexes in Registry of Deeds, 486 

Phipps-street l>ur\i>>g-ground, 487 

Paving Columbus avenue, 488 

Columbus avenue horse-car controversy, 493, 498 

Regulation of horse-car travel, 495, 508, 518, 550, 608, 626, 644 

662,700, 7:11,750 
Public urinals, 498, 500 
Meridian-street Bridge, 505 
Improved Sewerage, modification of contracts, 510 



Highland Railway, temporary tracks, 517 
New Court-House, 519, 584, 076, 720, 734 



Cazenovc place, 531, 549 
Naming Murray avenue, 531, 646 
Sudbui v-rivcr conduit, 548, 559, 600,609 
flight of visit to Public Institutions, 564 
Repairing bridges on West Chester park, 581 
Government bonds as security, 533 

ot Sup't of Common, 549 
Land near Police Station Eight, 568 

Abatement of nuisance assessment, 670 

Warren street, Charlestown, paving, 571 

Macadamizing Adams street, 572 

Use of Maj hew School-house for homeless wanderers, 592 

Commercial-street widening, 602, 638 

pay to Deputy Collectors, 646 
Pay of laborers before Thanksgiving, 647 
East Boston Ferries, reduction of tolls, 649 
Highland Hit. location, Hayuiarket square, 652 
South Boston K. K. over Dover-stieet Bridge, 660, 757 
Purchase ol gravel bank in Watertown, 681, 701 

ing out A street, 683 
Obstruction Of streets, 696 

Additional compensation for clerks in Collector's Dep't. 711 
Extra pa\ for policemen, 716 

Redui tioii of Market rents, 718 
Kuecland- treet obstructions, 725 

South Boston Lunatic Hospital, 726 

Improved Sewerage, and East Chester Park, 728 

Sato '■ residents, 751, 762 

illow for Roxbury Caual, 766 
ter Park Bridge, 758 

Hoard of Public Works, 764 

in partment hours, 764 
Whiton, Alderman — remarks: 

New sj tern of bookkeeping for Water Department, 54 

Burning street-lamps in night time, 149 

Labor at public institutions, 151 

Paj of lamplighters, 201 
\ Bill. 2:J4 

Removal of House of Correction, 251 

Uncollcctedhill for iron, 257 

Director of Bast Boston Kerries, 306 

Horse cai I , 384 

New building for Police Station Six, 406 

Statue of Charles Sumner, 429 

Fltchburg R.R. connection with Union Freight R.R, 429" 

Concert garden in West Roxbury, 450 

C. M. Dakin's victualler's license, 466 

Public Library Report, 490 

Sudbury -river conduit, 548, 559 

Regulation of horse-car travel, 550 

Right of visit to Public Institutions, 564 

Reimbursement for care of poor in City Hospital, 590 
Wilson, Ward 20— remarks: 

Accounts of Water Board, 74 

Iron pipes for Water Department, 57 

Loam for public grounds, 248 

Music on Common, 377 

Roxbury Canal, 432 

Powers of Police Commissioners, 474 
Wilson, Henry — 

Joint convention to receive portrait, a 400, c 407, a 428- 



INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS OF CITY COUNCIL. 



XIX 



Wolcott, Ward 11 — remarks : 
Joint rules and orders, 13, 15 
1'ree soup, 24 
Police Commission, 75 
Sale and purchase of ferry-boats, 87 
Pay of laborers, 91 
Management of public grounds, 116 
Police Belts, 122 

Resignation from Committee on Public Instruction, 222 
Requiring employes to be residents, 240, 261 
South Boston Branch Library, 393 
Proposed abolition of certain commissions, 394 
Grading Monument Hill, 421 
lloxbury Canal, 437 
Playgrounds, 442 

Powers of Police Commissioners, 457, 468 
Salaries of Police force, 475 
Non-resident employes, 704 
Pensioned policemen, 748, 774 
Strike at Grand Junction Wharf, 773 



Woolley, Ward 1 — remarks : 

Salaries of Police Commissioners, 370 

FINAL PROCEEDINGS. 
Common Council. 

Thanks to the President, 777 

Response of the President, 777 

Order passed for printing the President's address, 779 

Adjournment sine die, 779 

Board of Aldermen. 

Thanks to the Chairman, 781 

The Chairman's response, 781 

Committee to wait on the Mayor, 782 

Response of the Mayor, 782 

Order for printing final proceedings, 782 

Adjournment nine die, 782 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Organization of the Government, 

JANUARY 7, 1878. 



The members of the Board of Aldermen elect 
were called to order at 10.15 A. M. by the City 
Clerk. 

The Mayor elect, Hon. H. L. Pierce, entered the 
chamber and took the chair. He was accompa- 
nied by Mayor Prince, Chief Justice Gray of the 
Supreme Court, and Rev. Henry W. Foote of 
King's Chapel. 

A message was received from the Common 
Council that a quorum of that body were present 
and ready to be qualified. The Mayor and Alder- 
men elect and the city Clerk, together with Chief 
Justice Gray ami Rev. Mr. Foote, proceeded to 
the Common Council chamber in charge of the 
City Messenger. 

The mem tiers elect of the Common C uncil were 
called to order at 10.10 A. M. by Benjamin Pope of 
Ward 15, the senior member. 

On motion of Mr. Sampson of Ward 17, Messrs. 
Sampson of Wan! 17, Speneelevot Ward 10, Barry 
of Ward 22, Coe of Ward 23 and Wyman of Ward 
21 were appointed a committee to collect creden- 
tials, which they did, and reported that sixty- 
three members elect, constituting a quorum, were 
present. 

On motion ot .Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11 it was or- 
dered that a committee be appointed to inform 
the Mayor and Aldermen elect that a quorum of 
the Common Council were present and ready to 
be qualified. Mr. Wolcott was appointed said 
committee, and in a lew minutes he returned and 
reported that he had performed the duty and that 
the Mayor and Aldermen elect would forthwith at- 
tend tor the purpose of qualifying the members. 

The .Mayor and Aldermen elect entered the 
Council chamber and took seats with the Council- 
men elect Prayer was offered by Rev. Henry W. 
Foote. Chief Justice Gray adininstered the usual 
oaths of office to the Mayor elect, who in turn ad- 
ministered the usual oaths of office to the Alder- 
men and Councilmen elect. 

The Mayor delivered his inaugural address, at 
the conclusion of which the Mayor and Alder- 
men retired from the Council Chamber. 

In Board of Aldermen. 

The Board reassembled in separate session at 
11.35, his Honor Mayor Pierce in the chair. 

On motion of Alderman McLean the Board pro- 
ceeded to the choice of Chairman, with the follow- 
ing result: 

Whole number of ballots 12 

Necessary for a choice 7 

Alderman Solomon B. Stebbins bad 11 

Alderman Charles R. McLean * 1 

And Alderman Stebbins was declared elected. 
The Chairman-elect then took the chair, and, 
after briefly expressing thanks for the honor con- 
ferred, announced that the Board was ready to 
attend to such business as might come before it. 

On motion of Alderman McLean, it was order- 
ed — That a message be sent to intorm the Com- 
mon Council that Solomon B. Stebbins has been 
duly elected chairman of the Board for the pres- 
entmunicipal year. Passed, ami sent down. 

Alderman Viles moved that the Board proceed 
to an election of a Committee on Accounts. Car- 
ried, and Aldermen Stebbins, Guild and Hayden 
were fleeted. 

Alderman Viles offered an order— That the joint 
rules and orders of the City Council of 1877 be 
adopted as the joint rules anil orders of the pres- 
ent City Council until otherwise ordered, and that 
Aldermen with such as the Common Coun- 
cil may join be a committee to examine and re- 
port if any changes are required therein. Passed, 
and Aldermen Viles and McLean were appointed 
on said committee. Sent down. 

Alderman Harris offered an order— That the rules 
and orders ot the Hoard of Aldermen of 1877 be 
adopted as the rules and orders of this Board 

until otherwise ordered; and that Aldermen 

be a committee to examine and report if any 
alterations are required therein. Passed, and 
Aldermen Harris, Whiton and Robinson were ap- 
pointed said committee. 

Alderman Slade moved that the Board take a 
short recess until word should be received from 
the Common Council. Carried. 



The Board was called to order at 12 M., when a 
message was received from the Common Council 
that that body had organized by the election of 
Benjamin l'ope. President, and Washington 
Gregg, Clerk. 

Alderman Slade offered an order— That a mes- 
sage be sent to the Common Council proposing a 
convention of both branches of the City Council 
forthwith, for the purpose of choosing a City 
Clerk for the present municipal year. Passed. 
Sent down. 

The Mayor in the chair. 

A message was read announcing that the Com- 
mon Council had concurred in the order propos- 
ing a convention of the two branches for the elec- 
tion of a city clerk. 

The Mayor and the Board proceeded to the 
Common "Council chamber to hold a joint conven- 
tion. 

Upon returning from the Council chamber, Al- 
derman Guild offered an order -That Mondays at 
four o'clock P. M., be assigned as the days and 
hour for holding the regular meetings of this 
Board until otherwise ordered. Passed. 

A petition was received from B. F. Sturtevant, 
for leave to locate and use a steam engine and 
boiler of fifty horse-power in rear of Green street, 
Ward 23, and an order was passed for a hearing 
thereon on Jan. 28, at four o'clock P. M. 

a communication was received from the City 
Clerk, giving notice of the appointment of John 
T. Priest as Assistant City Clerk. Sent down. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Perkins, to 
Monday, Jan. 14, at four o'clock. 

< •million Council. 

After the Mayor and Aldermen retired from the 
Council chamber, Mi. Richardson of Ward 11 was 
called to the chair. On motion of Mr. Pierce of 
Ward 24, an election for President was ordered. 
Messrs. Crocker of Ward 9, Mowry of Ward 11 and 
Colby ot Ward 18 were appointed a committee to 
collect and count votes. They reported- 
Whole number of votes 69 

Necessary lor a choice 35 

Benjamin Pope of Ward 15 had 69 

Mr. Pope was declared unanimously elected. 
Messrs. Wolcott of Ward 11 and McGaragle of 
Ward 8 were appointed a committee to conduct 
the President-elect to the chair, which they did. 
The President took the chair, and said — 

For the very complimentary vote by which you 
have been pleased to place me for the second 
time in the position of President of the Common 
Council, I tender to you my heartfelt thanks, to- 
gether with the assurance that it is an honor that 
I fully appreciate. While a year's experience 
will lie of great service to me in having given to 
me a knowledge of the routine of public business, 
I do not find that it adds to my stock of self-re- 
liance, for I find myself impressed with a clearer 
sense of the responsibilities which rest upon 
me. New questions are continually arising and 
new positions display themselves unexpectedly, 
which require the constant vigilance of a presid- 
ing officer. I promise you my best efforts in the 
performance of the duties of this office, relying 
with confidence upon the continuance of the good- 
will which you have nowexpressed, and upon your 
indulgence'and cooperation during this municipal 
year, for whatever measure of success I may 
achieve. We meet here this dav to do our part 
in organizing the City Government for the 
municipal year which has now begun. 
Elected by our fellow citizens of the wards 
in which we respectively reside, as their repre- 
sentatives in this Common Council, we are to act 
as their proxies in the transaction of the business 
of this corporation. Our duties are of a business 
nature, to be performed on business principles 
only. Political and party preferences should be 
ignored, and personal and mercenary considera- 
tions laid aside. They have no place here, and 
their presence would be detrimental and 
demoralizing to the transaction of business. 
Our constituents who have sent us here 
expect with confidence that we shall dis- 
charge our duties with wisdom and fidel- 
ity; that the government will be adminis- 
tered with economy; that honest, faithful and 
efficient officials will be retained in service, and 
changes made when the public interests require 
them; that heads of departments having charge 
of the public work shall have more immediate 
control of the men; that discipline may prevail 
and greater efficiency may be obtained. While 
former City Governments have been sharp- 
ly criticised, while many things have 



JANUARY 7, 18 78 



been done from time to time which have 
drawn forth unfavorable comment, while 
others have been the subject of official investiga- 
tion, our city has been comparatively free from 
the corruption and mismanagement which have 
disgraced the annals of some other important 
cities. This fortunate state of affairs has been 
the pride, the boast of every Bcstonian. Our 
fellow citizens look to us, in connection with the 
coordinate branches of the government, to main- 
tain the high character of Boston as a munici- 
pality and to improve the administration of pub- 
lic affairs whenever it may be in our power. 

Our immediate predecessors disposed of nearly 
all of the important and interesting questions 
which came down to them from former crty gov- 
ernments, leaving but few which they were 
obliged to refer to our consideration. 

The most important matter which has been left 
over is one which concerns the health and com- 
fort of the inhabitants in the vicinity of the 
Northampton-street District, it being the abate- 
ment of the nuisance occasioned by the discharge 
of some of the principal sewers into the Roxbury 
Canal. The report of the Committee on 
Health, to whom this matter was referred, is 
contained in City Document No. 92, and 
the order reported by the Committee on Finance 
provides for a loan of $392,000 to constitute a spe- 
cial appropriation to be styled the Roxbury Canal 
Improvement. Another important matter is that 
reported on by ttie Committee on Markets at the 
session held by the Board of Aldermen on the 
6th of last August. The order reported by that 
committee contemplates the purchase from the 
Mercantile-wharf Corporation of the lot of land 
now leased to the city for the purpose of a produce 
market, and containing 80,000 feet more or less, for 
a sum not exceeding $320,000. 

Other schemes of equal, perhaps greater magni- 
tude may be developed as the year progresses, 
requiring the expenditure of large sums of money. 
Let us hope that we may not give our consent to 
any of them unless we are clearly satisfied that 
the interests of the city absolutely require them. 
In this connection it appears to me that the tax- 
payers are becoming somewhat concerned about 
the increase of the city debt. Fortunately there is 
an act passed by the Legislature of 1875 regulat- 
ing and limiting municipal indebtedness. The 
City Solicitor gave an opinion under date of 
Dec. 3, 1877, to the effect that the limit to which 
the city could incur indebtedness had been 
reached within the sum of $2,783,100 since which 
time have been passed orders for the widening of 
Commercial street authorizing a loan of $500,000, 
and for the improvement of Stony Brook at an 
expense of $133,000, leaving a balance which may 
yet be expended of $2,150,618. In the last report 
of the City Auditor, page 7. that official speaks 
emphatically in favor of the "prompt payment 
of ail debts, no renewal of outstanding 
loans, — care and strict economy in expenditures, — 
no borrowing of money except in extreme cases." 
It seems as if a feeling is growing that Boston 
should be freed from the burden of debt that now 
encumbers it. Of course a policy that has pre- 
vailed through many years of debt accumulation 
cannot at once be abandoned, but a reversal of 
the policy looking toward a diminution till all 
debt is eventually extinguished is a line of action 
that would meet the approval of our con- 
stituents. Before concluding I desire to call 
your attention to a matter which I feel 
that a majority of the members of the 
Council will pardon me for alluding to, as it con- 
cerns their comfort and occupies a prominent po- 
sition in the rules and orders of this Common 
Council. I mean the propensity which mem- 
bers of deliberative bodies are apt to indulge in 
of making long speeches. I will read an abstract 
of the specific rules of the Council on this point, 
as they differ somewhat from what is known as 
parliamentary law and practice. 

Section 16 provides that "no member having 
obtained the floor shall speak more than fifteen 
minutes (Sect. 17), nor more than twice if objec- 
tion is made, without first obtaining leave of the 
Council, nor more than once, until the otlier mem- 
bers, who have not spoken, shall speak, if they so 
desire." 

"Section 50. On the previous question and on 
the motion to lay on the table or take from the 
table, a time not exceeding ten minutes shall be 
allowed for debate, and no member shall speak 
more than three minutes" ; and section 63— "Debate 
on motions to reconsider shall be limited to thirty 



minutes, and no member shall speak more than 
five minutes." 

I am informed that some years ago a practice 
prevailed of committees making verbose and in- 
terminable reports, as if their length would be 
taken as a measure of the attention they had 
given to the subjects which had been referred to 
them. This was a cause of complaint of many 
members of the Council, and I am happy to 
say that of late years the evil has been 
remedied. Therefore, gentlemen, let your aim be 
short speeches and to the point, if you please, as 
it is seldom in a business body like this that other 
than these are listened to. Short speeches, and 
to the point, are the ones which engage the atten- 
tion, are grasped by the memory, and en- 
chain the convictions of the average lis- 
tener. And now, gentlemen, that we have 
commenced the business of this municipal 
year under pleasant auspices, with every 
prospect of an harmonious session, and an intelli- 
gent, conscientious discharge of all the important 
duties that have been intrusted to us, so may we 
invoke within ourselves the direction of the Ruler 
of the universe, that he may "so prosper all our 
consultations" during the continuance and to the 
close of our official term. 

On motion of Mr. Danforth of Ward 10, an 
election was ordered for Clerk of the Common 
Council. Committee to collect and count votes, 
Messrs. Danforth of Ward 10, Taylor of Ward 25, 
Lovering of Ward 24. 

Whole number of votes 71 

Necessary for a choice , , 3G 

Washington P. Gregg had 71 

Mr. Gregg was declared elected. The oath of 
office was administered to him by John P. Healy, 
City Solicitor. 

Messages were received from the Board of Al- 
dermen that they had organized, and proposing a 
joint convention for the election of a City Clerk. 
The Council concurred. Sent up. 

An order came up adopting the joint rules and 
orders for 1877, and appointing a special commit- 
tee to prepare rules for 1878. Concurred, and 
Messrs. Sibley of Ward 5, Wolcott of Ward 41 and 
Colby of Ward 18 were appointed on said commit- 
tee. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11 offered an order— That a 
committee be appointed to inform the Board of 
Aldermen that the Common Council is organized 
and ready to proceed to business. Passed, and 
Mr. Mowry was appointed to perform that duty. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24 offered an order for 'the 
appointment of a Standing Committee of five 
members of the Common Council on Elections. 
Passed, and Messrs. Sampson of Ward 17, Mc- 
Garagle of Ward 8, Plimpton of Ward 21, Denny 
of Ward 12, and Lovering of Ward 24 were ap- 
pointed said committee. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 offered an order — 
That when this Council adjourn it be to Thursday 
next at 7y 2 o'clock P. M., and that that be the day 
and hour lor the regular meetings or the Com- 
mon Council until otherwise ordered. Passed. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 offered an order That 
Thursday next, at 8 P. M., be assigned as the time 
for electing a Finance Committee, and for the ap- 
pointment of a Nominating Committee. Passed, 
and Messrs. Pierce of Ward 24, Kidney of Ward 
6, Hill of Ward 14, were appointed said commit- 
tee. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 offered orders— That until 
otherwise ordered, the rules and orders of the 
Common Council ot 1877 he adopted as the rules 
and orders of this Council; and, That Messrs. 

be a committee to prepare rules and orders 

for the government of the Council the current 
year. Severally passed, and Messrs. Siblev of 
Ward 5, Wolcott of Ward 11, and Colby of Ward 
18 were appointed said committee. 

Mr. Rosnosky of Ward 16 offered an order— That 
his Honor the Mayor be requested to furnish a 
copy of his address, that the same may be printed. 
Passed. Sent up. 

Mr. McDonald of Ward 12 offered an order — 
That a joint special committee be appointed to 
report what disposition shall be made of the top- 
ics in the Mayor's address. Passed, and Messrs. 
Crocker of Ward 9, Coe of Ward 23 andHollisof 
Ward 25 were appointed on said committee. 
Sent up. 

Mr. Roberts of Ward 4 offered an order— That a 
joint special committee, consisting of five mem- 
bers of this Board, with such as the Board of Al- 
dermen may join, be appointed to determine and 
pay the allowance ot State aid to the families of 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



disabled soldiers and the families of the slain. 
pursuant to existing acta of the Legislature; and 
that said committee have power to employ a pay- 
master and such clerical assistance as may be re- 
quired tor that purpose, and that the expense 
be charged to the appropriation for Soldiers' Re- 
lief. Read twice and passed. 

JOINT CONVENTION. 

A joint convention was held at 12.10 o'clock for 
the election of City Clerk, the Mayor presiding. 
Alderman Faunce and Councilmen Sampson of 
Ward 17 and Sibley of Ward 5 were appointed a 
committee to collect and count votes. They re- 
ported- 
Whole number of votes 84 

Necessary for a choice 43 

Samuel K. McCleary hail 82 

Ineligible candidate 2 

And Mr. .McCleary was elected. The usual oath of 
office was administered by the Mayor. 
The convention then dissolved. 

COMMON COUNCIL RESUMED. 

Sundry petitions were presented for recounts of 
viitis for Councilmen, which were referred to the 
Committee on Elections. 

Mr. Sampson ol Ward 17 offered an order— That 
a joint special committee, consisting of five mem- 
ber- of tins Hoard, with such as the Board of Al- 
dermen may join, be appoi ted to take charge of 
the improved system of sewerage. Passed. 

Mr. Sampson offered an order tor the appoint- 
ment of joint special committees to nominate the 
various city oftieeis. Passed. 

Mr. Brown of Ward 23 offered an order— That 
live members ot the Common Council, with such 
as the Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed 
to take charge of the improvement ol Stony 
Brook, under the provisions of chapter 196 of the 
Acts of 1874, with authority to remove the ob- 
structions in or over said bror.k or the tributa- 
ries thereof, to direct the water, and alter the 
courses, and deepen the channel thereof, and to 
take and purchase such lands as may be required 
for said purpose, the estimated cost thereof not to 
exceed the sum of $133,000. 

Amended, on motion of Mr. Crocker of Ward 9, 
by striking out the last clause relating to the ap- 
propriation, and as amended passed. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23 offered an order that the 
joint standing committees, when appointed, 
resume the unfinished business appropriate to 
them referred from the last City Council. Passed. 
Sent up. 

Mr. Mowry ot Ward 11 offered an order— That 
the heads of departments an'* Boards ot Direc- 
tion be requested to submit their annual reports 
in print. Passed. Sent up. 



Mr. Kidney of Ward 6 offered an order— That 
the Municipal Register be printed under the di- 
rection of the Joint Committee on Rules and Or- 
ders, who may emplov such assistance as may lie 
deemed advisable, and that they also prepare a 
pocket edition of the rules and a list of the mem- 
bers and committees. Passed. Sent up. 

Mr. Perham offered an order— That the City 
Messenger be instructed to admit no person upon 
the floor of the Council chamber or into the ante- 
rooms ot the same who is not a member of the 
(it\ Government, or persons properly int induced, 
while the Couucil is in session; always excepting 
those persons who are permitted by the president 
of the Council. 

Mr. Pierce ot Ward 24 said there was some de- 
sire lor a change, and alter consultation with the 
President he had prepared the following, which 
he offered as a substitute: 

Ordered, That the City Messenger be and he is 
hereby instructed to allow no person or persons 
upon the floor of the Council chamber or in the 
ante-rooms of the same, excepting members ol the 
City Council, heads of departments and reporters, 
while the Council is in session, and after the seats 
provided for spectators have been occupied. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 'J thought it might be de- 
sirable to embody the idea in the rules, and on his 
motion the order and substitute were relet re i to 
the Committee on Rules and Orders 

On moi inn of Mr. McDonald of Ward 12, Thurs- 
day at 8.15 was assigned as t lie tune for election 
of a Committee on Accounts, and Ale-sis. Sibley 
of Ward 5, Sampson of Ward 17 and McDonald of 
Ward 12 were appointed a committee to make 
nomination-. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward i) offered an order — 
That a joint special committee, consisting of 
three members of this Board, with such as the 
Board of Aldermen may join, be appointed to 
take charge ot all matters of unfinished business 
relating to public parks. Passed. 

Mi. Richardson of Ward 10 offered an order- 
That the Joint Special Committee on Improved 
Sewerage inquire and report to the City Council 
the most expedient way of abating the nuisance 
in Roxbury Canal; whether, if all sewage and 
drainage matter he diverted and excluded from 
it, and the canal thoroughly dredged out, the 
nuisance would longer exist; and whether any 
other or lurther act or authority 1 imu the General 
Court is desirable or necessary to enable the city 
to abate that nuisance. Passed. Sent up. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 presented a petition of 
Ansel J. Harris el al. tor plank walk on Black- 
stone square. Referred to Committee on Com- 
mon when appointed. Sent up. 

On motion of Mr. Burke of Ward 2 the drawing 
for seats took place, after which the Council ad- 
journed. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 10, 1878. 



Regular meeting at 7.30 o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Pope, President, in the chair. 

PAPEK FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Certificate of election of Committee on Ac- 
counts. Placed on file. 

COMMUNICATIONS AND REPORTS FROM CITV OFFI- 
CERS. 

The report of fires and alarms for the month of 
December was received from the Fire Commis- 
sioners. Sent up. 

The Auditor's monthly exhibit of the appropria- 
tions for Jan. 1 was received. Sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Hill of Ward 14— Petition of Dudley Pray 
et al., for recount of votes in Ward 13. Referred 
to the Committee on Electious. 

By Mr. Spencelev of Ward 19— Petition of Dex- 
ter H. Follett to be paid for services of field and 
staff of First Battalion of Cavalry on Sept. 17, 
1877. Referred to Joint Committee on Claims. 
Sent up. 

By Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— Petition of C. M. 
Winch et al., for a recount of votes in Ward 16. 
Referred to the Committee on Elections. 

RECOUNTS OF VOTES. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 submitted reports 
from the Committee on Elections as follows : 

Ward 20. Report on petition of W. E. Wood- 
ward et al., for a recount of the votes cast in 
Ward 20, that they have carefully recounted the 
same with the following result: 

William E. Whicher 1259 

Thomas E. Wilson 1 137 

Paul H. Keudricken 1130 

Plbenezer Adams 1094 

Thomas F. Currier 1076 

Nathan S. Wilbur 932 

Paul H. Kendrickson 3 

E. Wilson 2 

Wilson 1 

D. Restorice 1 

Edward A. Kilham 1 

George E. Bullard 1 

H. Kendricken 1 

Samuel J. Tuttle 1 

Charles A.B. Shepard 1 

Henry J. Slavin 1 

It appears, therefore, thttt William E. Whicher, 
Thomas E. Wilson and Paul H. Kendricken were 
elected members of the Common Council, and 
that Ebenezer Adams, who received a certificate 
of election and now occupies his seat at this 
board, was not elected. The committee recom- 
mend the passage of the following: 

Whereas, It appears from a recount of the origi- 
nal ballots cast at the last municipal election in 
Ward 20, that Thomas E. Wilson was elected a 
member of the Common Council from said ward 
in place of Ebenezer Adams, who received a cer- 
tificate of election: 

Resolved, That Thomas E. Wilson is entitled to 
the seat in this board now occupied by Ebenezer 
Adams. 

The resolve was read twice and passed. Subse- 
quently, on motion of Mr. Sampson of Ward 17, 
that gentleman was appointed a committee to 
conduct Mr. Wilson to the City Clerk to be quali- 
fied, which was done, and Mr. Wilson took his seat 
in the Council. 

Ward 7. Report on petition of James Golden 
el al., for a recount of votes cast at the last munic- 
ipal election in Ward 7, that they have recounted 
the original ballots, with the following result: 

Alexander B. McGahey 1501 

Richard Roach 1140 

Peter Cannon 769 

Thomas F. Simonds • 597 

E. Edward Dohertv v 529 

James J. McGovem 418 

John A. McLaughlin 282 

PatrickJ. McDermott 177 

Milton A. Kent 153 

From which it appears that the members now 
occupying seats at this board are entitled to the 
same. Accepted. 

Ward 8. Report on petition of John F. Murphy 
etal., lor recount of votes in Ward 8, that they 
have recounted the original ballots, with the fol 
lowing result: 



Patrick F. McGaragle 1140 

Dennis O'Connor 857 

Lemuel M. Ham 797 

Michael F.Wells 769 

Jacob Abbot 670 

Charles E. Clark 354 

Jeremiah A. Keefe 187 

Hames Christal 74 

James H. Christal 24 

William H.Cook 2 

And Fred Cook, C. H. B. Jtsreck, E. W. James, 
Charles W. Wilder, George E. Peterson, T. F. Tan- 

sey, John W. Martin and — Clark had one 

each. From which it appears that the members 
now occupying seats at this board are entitled to 
the same. Accepted. 

Ward 3. Report on petition of George A. San- 
derson and others, for a recount of votes cast in 
Ward 3 for Nathaniel D. Toppa^ and James J. 
O'Keefe, that the original ballots have been re- 
counted, with the following result: 

Nathaniel D. Toppan 911 

James J. O'Keefe 858 

From which it appears that Nathaniel D. Toppan, 
who now occupies a seat at this board, is entitled 
to the same. Accepted. 

Ward 25. Report on petition of James H. Lee 
and John J. Coffey and others, that the votes cast 
in Ward 25 be recounted, that they have recount- 
ed the same, with the following result: 

George W. Hollis 584 

Jacob F. Taylor 558 

JohnH.Lee 516 

Webster F. Warren 421 

John A. Sawyer 71 

And Z. Taylor Cushman, George B. Livermore, G. 
H. Hawle,), William Scollans, Thomas Ring, Lar- 
kin Right and B. S. Fiske one each; from which 
it appears that The members occupying seats at 
this board are entitled to the same. Accepted. 

JOINT RULES AND ORDERS. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 submitted the following: 

The Joint Special Committee appointed to pre- 
pare rules and orders for the government of the 
City Council during the present municipal year, 
having considered the subject, would respectful- 
ly recommend that the following changes be 
made in the rules and orders of the last City 
Council, namely : 

Section 1. Increasing the number of the Com- 
mittee on Salaries from five to eight members. 

Sect. 5. Add the following, "And at all meet- 
ings of committees the records of the previous 
meeting shall be read, unless otherwise ordered 
by the committee." 

Sect. 6. Add the following : "No meeting of any 
committee snail be called upon less notice than 
twenty-four hours, without the consent of all the 
members thereof." 

Sect. 9. Amend so that it will read as follows: 
"No report of a joint committee shall be received 
by either branch of the City Council uuless agreed 
to by such committee, at a duly notified meeting 
thereof." 

Sect. 14. Strike out all after the word "assem- 
bled" in the fourth line of the pocket edition, and 
inserting the following: 

"No order or vote which, if passed, would have 
the effect to amend, suspend, or repeal an ordi- 
nance, shall be entertained in either branch of the 
City Council, unless it is in the form of an ordi- 
nance." 

Sect. 19. Amend to read as follows : "No presid- 
ing officer of a board, or chairman of a commit- 
tee, unless duly authorized by such board or com- 
mittee, shall approve any bill or account against 
the city." 

Sect. 20. Strike out the section and insert the 
following in place thereof : "Section 20. No bills 
for refreshments or carriages furnished to any 
member of the City Government shall be paid, 
unless s-uch bills shall specify, in detail, the names 
of the members to whom such refreshments or 
carriages were furnished, the dates of furnishing 
the same, and shall be approved by the presiding 
officer of a board or the chairman of a committee 
duly authorized thereto. 

The presiding officer of a board or chairman of 
a committee shall not approve any bill tor refresh- 
ments which includes among its items liquors or 
cigars, or any bill for refreshments furnished to 
any person not a member of such board or com- 
mittee, unless specially authorized so to do by 
vote of such board or committee." 

Sect. 21. Amend to read as follows: "All bills 
for refreshments or carriages, including items in- 
curred more than three months previous to the 
date of their presentation to the Auditor, shall 
go before the City Council for approval." 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



The accompanying order covers the proposed 
changes, and your committee would respectfully 
recommend its passage. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Clinton Vi i 
Cn aki.ks R, .Mi l.i \ \. 
Edwix Sihley. 
Roger Woi.ihh . 
John F. Coli;\ . 

Accompanying tbe report was an order estab- 
lishing the rules in accordance with the recom- 
mendations of the committee. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 asked Mr. Sibley to ex- 
plain the changes and Mr. Sibley said they were 
all indicated in the report. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 hoped they would not 
be passed tonight, as no member had had an op- 
portunity to look at them to see how they affect 
the present rules and orders, and he moved that 
the consideration ot them be specially assigned to 
next Thursday evening at eisrht o'clock. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 approved the assign- 
ment, in the Committee on Claims, where all the 
evidence is taken down and forms a part of the 
records, the reading of the records at every meet- 
ing would be a nuisance. Any one who has 
served upon that committee could not but be con- 
vinced of its uselessness. 

Mr. Sibley said the rule left that subject entire- 
ly in tbe hands of the committee. The records 
are to be read unless otherwise ordered by the 
committee. 

The motion to specially assign prevailed. 

COMMITTEE ON Accol NTS. 

Mr. Sibley of W ard 5 submitted a report from 
the special committee to nominate candidates for 
Committee on Accounts, recommending the elec- 
tion of Roger Wolcott, Coolidge Barnard, John A. 
Kidney, Story N. Sawyer, Nathaniel .1. Rust. 
Accepted. 

Subsequently the election came up by special 
assignment. 

Committee to Collect and Count Votes— Messrs. 
Mowrv of Ward 11, McGeough of Ward 13, Hib- 
bard of Ward 17. 

Whole number of votes 66 

Necessary for a choice 34 

Roj;er Wolcott had 65 

Coolidge Barnard 66 

John A Kidney 66 

Henrv N. Sawyer 66 

Nat haniel .1 . Rust 66 

Also two ballots containing tbe committee's 
nominations tor Finance Committee. 

The gentlemen above named were declared 
elected. 

secrecy OF COMMITTEES' PROCEEDINGS. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24 offered an order— That 
the action of committees shall be kept trom the 
public until the committees have reported to the 
City Council. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— If we are going to make 
a rule of that kind it ou^ht to l.e in our joint 
rules and not in a special order. If we propose to 
make a rule of that sort I think the proper way is 
to have a joint rule applying to all committees. 1 
move that it be referred to the Committee on Joint 
Rules and Orders. 

The motion prevailed. Sent up. 

DOCl MINIS lOlt ME.MliERS OK THE CITY GOV- 
ERNMENT. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 offered an order- 
That the Citv Messenger be and he is hereby or- 
dered to send to the address of each member of 
the City Council conies o' the city documeuts, as 
they mav be issued; also that he provide an index 
to the documents, as they shall tie placed upon 
file, upon the desks of members of the City 
Council. 

Mr. Spenceley— The explanation of that is that 
documeuts shall be sent to the address of mem- 
bers of the City Council, that members may have 
an opportunity to look over them at home or at 
their places of" business, which we cannot do here 
as well as many of us would like to do. Take this 
report on joint rules, If we had had an opportu- 
nity to look at it at our homes we might have been 
prepared to act upon it tonight. In relation to 
the last part of the order, gentlemen know that 
when there is a large file of documents upon the 
desk it is often hard to find what you want, and 
by having an index you can do so more readily. 

Mr. Crocker— Is it proposed to have an index 
trom time to time during the year? 

Mr. Spenceley— He proposes to put in blank 
pages in the first part of the book and note the 
documents down as they come in. 

The order was read twice and passed. Sent up. 



ROXIitRI (ANAL. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11 offered an order— That 
the Committee on the Judiciary obtain from the 
City Solicitor a written statement of the city's 
rights, if any, in and to that portion of the Rox- 
bury Canal which it is proposed to till; said state- 
ment to furnish information as to what extent the 
city may fill said canal without incurring dam- 
ages therefor. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I don't see any 
harm in that order, but that subject has been re- 
ferred to the Special Committee on Improved 
Sewerage, and 1 suppose that committee, in the 
discharge of their duty, under the order passed at 
the last session, if they thought it desirable, could 
get the opinion of the law officer of the city. 
However, I have no objection to the order, if it is 
more desirable to have it at the request of the 
Council.- 1 mention this because I did n't know 
but possibly the gentleman might have forgotten 
the order passed at our last session. 

Mr. Mowry— I remember very well the order in- 
troduced by the gentleman at the last session. It 
has reference to a subject entirely different from 
the one to which this order refers. This one has 
reference to the legal rights which the city may 
have in the portion of the canal which it is pro- 
posed to till up. His order has reference to the 
expediency of this or that nlan of abating the 
nuisance. * This order in nowise clashes with tbe 
one introduced at the last session; but it is intro- 
duced so that when the question comes before the 
Council we may know what the legal rights of the 
city are in that portion of the canal which it is 
proposed to fill. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I have no objection 
to tbe order, although I thought that in the de- 
termination of the best method of ahating that 
nuisance, the committee would undoubtedly take 
into consideration the legal rights of the city in 
and about the canal. 1 do not object to Its pas- 
sage if it is desirable. 

Mr. Mowry— The committee the gentleman re- 
fers to would have no right to obtain the infor- 
mation which this order contemplates. This 
matter comes within the jurisdiction of the Judi- 
ciary Committee, who are to ascertain the opin- 
ion of the City Solicitor upon all le^al questions. 
It would not be within the province of the com- 
mittee he refers to to ascertain what the city's 
legal rights are within this canal. 

The order was passed. 

RILES AND ORDERS Of THE COMMON OOl N'< IL. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 6 submitted tne following: 

The committee appointed to prepare rules and 
orders tor the government of the Common Coun- 
cil for the year 1878, having considered the sub- 
ject, would respectfully recommend that the rules 
and orders ot the Council for 1S77. as printed in 
the municipal register for that year, be adopted 
as the rules and orders for the government of 
this Council, with the following amendments, 
namely: 

After section 17 insert a new section, as follows: 
"In all cases when the time has expired of a mem- 
ber speaking and is extended by vote of the Con u- 
cil, it shall beheld to be extended only lor an addi- 
tional period equal to that which the member was 
entitled before such vote. 

After section 32i> insert a new section, as fol- 
lows: "If. shall be the duty of the City Messen- 
ger to see that no person or persons are allowed 
upon the floor of the Council' Chamber, or in the 
anterooms of the same, while the Council is in 
session, and after the seats provided for specta- 
tors have been occupied, exceping members ot 
the City Council, heads of departments and re- 
porters." 

In section 29 strike out the word "select," and 
insert the word "special" in place thereof. 

Strike out the whole of section 30. 

In section 31 insert the words "appointed by the 
President" after the word "Council" in the' first 
line. 

In section 35 strike out the words "in committee 
assembled," and insert the words "by such com- 
mittee at a duly notified meeting thereof" in place 
thereof. 

In section 30, strike out the words "may be re- 
quired to," and insert the word "shall" in place 
thereof; also strike out the word"to," in the third 
line. 

In section 44 insert the words "who are requir- 
ed" after the word "officer." 

In section 50 strike out the word "select" 
wherever it occurs, and insert the word "special" 
in place thereof. 



JANUAKY 10, 1878 



6 



In section 65 strike out the word "he," in the 
third line, and insert the words "a member" in 
place thereof. In the fourth line, after the word 
"hours," strike out the word "of" and insert the 
wo'd "after" in place thereof. In the fifth line, 
after the word "he" insert the words "or in case 
he shall not move to withdraw his motion, any 
other member." 

Your committee make no recommendation on 
the orders referred to them in relation to the use 
of the floor and anterooms of the Council Cham- 
ber by outside persons, but as will be seen by the 
foregoing, a new section in the rules and orders 
covering the ground, has been reported. 

On motion of Mr. Sibley the report and accom- 
panying orders were laid on the table and ordered 
to be printed. 

CREW OF THE FIRE BOAT. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Fire Commissioners be au- 
thorized to reinstate the rations to the crew of 
the fire-boat William M. Flanders. 

Referred, on motion of Mr. McGaragle, to the 
Joint Committee on Fire Department. Sent up. 

WORK FOR DESTITUTE CITIZENS. 

Mr. Roach of Ward 7 offered an order— That 
Messrs. , with such as the Board of Alder- 
men may join, be a committee to consider the 
expedience of providing such work as may be ad- 
vantageously done at this season of the year, for 
resident citizens, destitute and unable to obtain 
employment. 

Read twice and uassed, and Messrs. Roach of 
Ward 7, Thompson of Ward 9 and Cox of Ward 15 
were appointed on said committee. Sent up. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24 submitted a report 
from the special committee to nominate candi- 
dates for Finance Committee on the part of the 
Common Council, recommending the election of 
Eugene H. Sampson, J. Homer Fierce, Moses W. 
Richardson, Henry F. Coe, George L. Thorndike, 
George B. Webster, Francis J. Ward. Accepted. 

Later in the session the election of said com- 
mittee wus taken up by special assignment. ■ 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24— In justice to the nomi- 
nating committee I feel called upon to state that 
the nomination maae by the committee was unani- 
mous. Since we came into the ball this evening 
we have discovered another ticket hearing the 
name of Mr. J. B.Richardson in place of Mr. M. W. 
Richardson. I have learned that this ticket was 
brought in on account of some personal feeling. 
I hope the nominations will be accepted and the 
ticket elected. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— In consequence of the 
remarks made by the chairman of the Nominating 
Comrniitee, I ieel called upon to make a personal 
explanation. I find myself in City Hall this year 
against my own expressed wishes. I have had 
the honor of serving three years upon the Finance 
Committee of the city of Boston, for which I re- 
turn my sincere thanks to my fellow members 
who ha\e elected me. When you appointed the 
committee to nominate a Committee on Finance, 
1 waited upon the chairman and stated that I did 
not wish to serve upon that committee, and men- 
tioned the fact that I was not a candidate. I had 
the honor t > wait upon you, sir, and ask to be re- 
lieved 1 rom certain duties. As you well know, I per- 
formed a great deal of duty last year, and vou 
allowed me to be relieved from service upon the 
Committee o Claims this year. I now have the 
honor to ask the Council to excuse me from serv- 
ing upon the Finauce Committee this year, and I 
trust that gentlemen will oblige me in that way. 

Mr. Hibbard of Ward 17— Under the existing 
circumstances, I move that this election be post- 
poned one week, and that the nominations be re- 
committed to the committee. 

Mr. Barry of Ward 22— Unless the gentleman 
can give some better reason than that, I hope the 
special assignment lor the next meeting will not 
be made, but that we shall proceed with an elec- 
tion this evening. 

Mr. Hibbard— I don't know any reason I can 
give except that the gentleman has declined to 
serve, and I think the best thing thac can be done, 
under the circumstances, is to send the nomina- 
tions back to the committee. 

The motion to assign the election to the next 
meeting, and recommit the nominations to the 
committee, prevailed. 

Later in the session Mr. Richardsou of Ward 10 
rose to a question of privilege and sa'.d, In view 
of the appearance of my name upon a ticket for 
the Committee on Finance, I desire to say— what 
many members of the Council already know- 



that it was a surprise to me, and 1 had no knowl- 
edge of it until I came into the Council chamber 
this evening. Inasmuch as the nominations have 
been referred back to the committee, I should not 
say anything except for the remarks already 
made here, which might be construed as some- 
thing unfavorable to myself, if I were utterly si- 
lent. I will therefore simply say that I decline to 
run upon any ticket not nominated by the com- 
mittee appointed to make the nominations. 

BADGES. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— This is a very dull 
night, and as it is raining considerably outside, I 
desire to offer tne annual wraneje in the shape of 
this order: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to appoint the members of the Common Coun- 
cil police officers without pav, and that Messrs 

be a committee to procure suitable badges' 

for the same, the expense attending the same not 
to exceed five dollars each ; and to be charged to 
the appropriation for the Contingent Fund of the 
Common Council. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17—1 move the indefinite 
postponement of that order. It is one which has 
been introduced year after vear, and I have op- 
posed it year after year. It is intended to gratify 
the personal vanity of members, and I think that 
in times like these we can afford to forego that 
pleasure. I have not taken a badge for three 
years, and I trust that no member will take one 
this year. 

Mr. McGaragle— I hope the order will not be in- 
definitely postponed. I introduce it thus early in 
hopes that members might consider it. I was not 
going to press its passage tonight; hut unless 
that he has been an opponent of badges 
some better and more substantial reason is 
given than that offered by the gentleman— 
for three years— I hope it will pass, for 
at least I think we should have some better and 
stronger grounds. Shortly after the opening last 
year I had the honor to offer this order, and after 
a lengthy and stormy debate for several evenings 
it was finally carried. Times were hard then, and 
are now; but there were fifty-eight responses to 
the notice that the committee sent, which I con- 
sider a pretty fair showing for this body. One- 
half of the membeis this vear are new members 
who have never been here before, and I don't 
wish by my vote to deprive them of a badge, or 
an old member, if he wishes it. Therefore, I hope 
the order will pass. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11— I hope the order will 
not pass. I concur with the remarks of the gen- 
tleman from Ward 17. There seem to be no valid 
reasons tor passing this order and makino- this 
appropriation. I contested the same order last 
year, and I shall do so this vear. If I could see the 
least good to result from the appropriation, I 
would not oppose it. 

Mr. Hill of Ward 14-1 wish to say a word for 
one of the new members— this being my first ap- 
pearance here. I hope I shall always be ready to 
speak against spending any money that is 'not 
necessary, and I hope this Council will not spend 
any money for badges. I think it is too much 
child's play tor grown men. It will be spending 
money for something of which there is no earthly 
use. I hope it will be indefinitely postponed 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 16 moved to lay the order on 
the table. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17-1 hope that dispo- 
sition will not be made of the order. We know 
what has been done, and how it has been rushed 
through year after year, and I trust it will be in- 
definitely postponed. 
The motion to lay on the table was lost. 
The motion to indefinitely postpone was declared 
carried. 

Mr. McGaragle doubted the vote, and on his 
motion the yeas and nays were ordered on solv- 
ing the doubt. The motion to indefinitely post- 
pone was carried— yeas 44, nays 23. 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Krawlev, Brown, X Y 
Brintnall, Clapp, Colby, Crocker. Danforth, Dev- 
lin, Drynan, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Hollis. Howland, 
Kendricken, Lauten, McGahev, MeGeough, Mow- 
ry, O'Connor, Pierce, Plimpton, ,7. B. Richardsou, 
M. W. Richardson, Roberts. Rosnosky, Rust 

E. H. Sampson, O. H. Sampson, Saotr'v, H N 
Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Sibley, Smith. Spenceley, J 

F. Taylor, J. Taylor, Thompson, Toppan, Ward 
Wilson, Wolcott, Wyman- 44. 

Nays— Messrs. Barry, B. Brintnall, Burke. Can- 
non, Day, Denny. Dohertv. Fernald. Flvnn, Kel- 
ley, Kidney, Lovering, McDonald, McGaragle. 
Mullaue, Mullen, Nason, Pearl, Perham, Roach, 
Shepard, Whicher. Woolley— 23. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



Absent or uot voting— Messrs. Coe, Cox, Thorn- 
dike, Webster— 4. 

Subsequently Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 moved a 
reconsideration of the indefinite postponement, 
hoping it would not prevail. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2— It seems to me that is 
rather cowardly, to make that motion at the pres- 
ent time. If there is any merit in that motion I 
suppose it will be safe enough. I don't see any 
necessity for reconsidering the vote. It is a well- 
known fact that most of the members of this 
Council who have been here before have received 
badges and worn them. There are a great many 
new members who perhaps would like a badge. I 
have had two badges; I don't want one, but if any 
members want badges I think they should have 
them. 1 anybody wants to reconsider that vote 
let him do it. It a majority of the Council don't 
want badges, let them say so. I don't think it is 
right to make the motion at the present time. 

Air. Sampson of Ward 17—1 fail to see where the 
cowardice comes in. The Council have just voted 
by a decided majority to indefinitely postpone the 
order, and in order to settle it I moved a recon- 
sideration, hoping it would not prevail. 1 think 
the Council are determined not to have badges 
this year, and as that is a decision which I heart- 
ily approve I moved the reconsideration. 

Mr. McGaragle— I offered the order. If the gen- 
tleman, with his long legislative experience, will 
tell me how things are rushed through here, I 
should move a reconsideration. I offered the or- 
der from no personal motive. I offered it as the 
annual wrangle, and I don't care much about it 
one way or the other; but I am iree to say that I 
am willing to vote to give any man what I have 
had myself. 1 think it is rather rushing it, when 
the vote stood two to one. I think the gentleman 
from East Boston has correctly termed it cow- 
ardly. 

Mr Sampson of Ward 17— If that is the right 
term, I accept it and call it cowardly. I hope the 
Council will again express '.heir opinion against 
the order. 

The motion to reconsider was lost. 

sivmiim; A M) SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

The 1'resident announced the followiug com- 
mittees: 

dominating Committees. 

Overseers of the Poor— Bi intnall of Ward 5, 
Flynn of Ward 16, Toppan of Ward 3. 

Superintendents of Bridges — Fernald of Ward 
15, Rowland of Ward 5, Ward ot Ward 21. 

Harbor .Master— Mullen of Ward 13, Woolley of 
Ward 1, Di yuan of Ward 6. 

Superintendent of streets — Perhaui of Ward 23, 
Day of Ward 4, Taylor ot Ward 25. 

Superintendent of Common— Sibley of Wards, 
Mullane of Ward 12, Devlin ol Ward 13. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings -Brown of 
Ward 23, Briutnall ol \\ aid 3, Ham oi Ward 8. 

Superintendent ot Public Lands— Cox of Ward 
15, Kelley ot Ward 6, Mason ot Ward 17. 

City Architect— Soenceley of Ward 19, Sawyer 
of Ward 24, Danforth of Ward 10. 

Superintendent of Sewers— Pearl of Ward 1, 
Hollis of Ward 26, Clapp Ol Ward 14. 

City Messenger— Sampson of Ward 17, Crocker 
of Ward 9, McGaragle of Ward 8. 

City Engineer— Webster of Ward 3, Whicber ot 
Ward 20, Doherty of Ward 2. 

City Surveyor— Thorndike of Ward 2, Roach of 
Ward 7, Sawyer of Ward 18. 

Citv Registrar— Sibley ol Ward 5, Burke of Ward 
2, Hiil ot Ward 14. 

City Solicitor— Crocker of Ward 9, Mowry of 
Ward 11, Colby Of Ward is. 

Water Registrar — Richardson of Ward 10, Barry 
Of Ward 22, Santry of Ward 19 

Commissioner ol Cedar Grove Cemetery— Pierce 
of Ward 24, Denny of Ward 12, Keudricken of 
Ward 20. 

Directors For Public Institutions— Speuceley of 
Ward 1!), Brown of Ward 23, Burke ot Ward 2. 

Directors for Bast Boston Ferries— Roberts of 
Ward 4. McDonald of Ward 12, Shepard of Ward 1. 

Trustees ot City Hospital— Hibbard of Ward 17, 
Lauten of Ward 14, Brawley ot Ward 19. 

Trustees of Public Library— Sibley of Ward 5, 
Barnard of Ward 24, Smith of Ward 9. 

Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery— Hill of Ward 
14, Cannon ot Ward 7, Cox of Ward 15. 

Commissioners of Sinking Funds — Sampson of 
Wait! 17, Richardson of Ward 11, McGeough of 
Ward 13. 

City Auditor— Coe of Ward 23, Plimpton of 
Ward 21, Lovering of Ward 4. 

City Treasurer— Richardson of Ward 11, Thomp- 
son of Ward 9, W T yman of Ward 21. 



City Collector— Wolcott of Ward 11, Taylor of 
Ward 1G, O'Connor of Ward 8. 

Clerk of Committees— Kidney of Ward 6, Rust 
of Ward 10, Sampson of Ward 18. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters— Woolley 
of Ward 1, Rosnosky of Ward 16, McGahey of 
Ward 7. 

Joint Standing and Special Committees. 

Assessors' Department— Richardson of Ward 11, 
Thorndike of Ward 2, Kidney of Ward 6, Hill of 
Ward 14, Wyman of Ward 21. 

Claims— Richardson of Ward 10, Mowrv of Ward 
11, McDonald ot Ward 12, Sampson of Ward 18, 
Plimpton of Ward 21. 

Common, etc. — Siblev of Ward 5, Danforth of 
Ward 10, Hibbard of Ward 17, Flynn ot Ward 16, 
Mullane of Ward 12. 

City Engineer's Department— Brintnall of Ward 
Barry of Ward 22, Woolley of Ward 1. 

City Registrar's Department— Whicher of Ward 

20, Rosnosky of Ward 16, Hollis of Ward 25. 
East Boston Ferries — Burke of Ward 2, Roberts 

of Ward 4, Roach of Ward 7, Wilson of Ward 20, 
Ham of Ward 8. 

Fire Department— Spenceley of Ward 19, Burke 
of Ward 2, Cannon of Ward 7. 

Fuel— Flynn of Ward 16, O'Connor of Ward 8, 
McGahey of Ward 7. 

Harbor— Bainaid of Ward 24, Mullen of Ward 

13, Drinan of Ward 0. 

Health Department^Sibk-y of Ward 5, Cox of 
Ward 15, Perham of Ward 23." 

City Hospital— Mullen of Ward 13, Tappan of 
Ward 3, Kendricken of Ward 20. 

Legislative Matters— Mowry ot Ward 11, Shep- 
ard of Ward 1, McGeough ot Ward 13. 

Mt. Hope and Cedar Grove Cemeteries— Saw- 
yer of Ward 24. Whicher of Ward 20, Smith of 
Ward 9. 

Ordinances— Crocker of Ward 9, Thompson of 
Ward 9, Richardson of Ward 10, Wolcott of Ward 
11, Colby of Ward 18. 

Overseers ot the Poor— Mullane of Ward 12, 
Doherty ot Ward 2, O'Connor ot Ward 8. 

Printing— Pierce of Ward 24, Sawyer of Ward 18, 
Devlin of Ward 13. 

Public Baths-Pearl of Ward 1, Fei nald ot Ward 

15, Howl and ot Ward 5, Ham of Ward 8, Devlin ot 
Ward 13 

Public Buildings— Spenceley of Ward 19, Pearl 
of Ward 1, Barry or Ward 22, Clapp of Ward 14, 
Brintnall of Ward 3. 

Public Institutions— Brown of Ward 23, Roi erts 
ol Ward 4, Sawyer ot Ward 18, Woolley of Ward 1, 
McGeough ol W aid 13. 

Public Instruction— Coe of Ward 23, Wolcott of 
Ward 11, Webster ol Ward 3, Rust of Ward 10. 

Public Lands— Crocker of Ward 9, Danforth of 
\\ aid 10, NaSOD ot Ward 17. 

Public Library— Webster of Ward 3, Barnard of 
\\ aril 24, Hill of Ward 14, Nason of Ward 17, Ken- 
dricken of Ward 20. 

Salaries— McDonald of Ward 12, Rust of Ward 
in, Toppan ot Ward 3. 

Streets— Pernam of Ward 23, Day of Ward 4, 
Brintnall of Ward 5, Lauten of Ward 14, Shepard 
of Ward 1. 

City Surveyors' Department— Taylor of Ward 16, 
Smith of Ward 9, Hollis of Ward 25. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings— McGaragle 
of Ward 8. Brawley of Ward 19, Santry of Ward 19. 

Treasury Department— Ricbarrtson of Ward li, 
Wyman oi Ward 21, Sampson of Ward 18. 

Water— Wilson ol Ward 20, Rosnosky of Ward 

16, Brawley of Ward 19. 

Public Parks— Thompson of Ward 9, Coe of 

Ward 23, Ward of Ward 81. 

Impioved Sewerage— Sampsou of Ward 17, 
Thorndike of Ward 2, Pierce of Ward 24, Day of 
Ward 4, Richardson of Ward 10. 

Stony Brook— Brown of Ward 23, Ward of Ward 

21, Taylor of Ward 25, Santry ot Ward 19, Taylor 
of Ward 16. 

State Aid- Hibbard of Ward 17, Doheity of 
Ward 2, Kelly of Ward 6, Roach of Ward 7, 
Loveing ot Ward 4. 

Standing Committees, Common Council. 

Police— Cannon of Ward 7, Kelley of Ward 6, 
Brintnall ot Ward 3, Clapp of Ward 14, Denny of 
Ward 12. „ 

Paving— Fernald of Ward 15, Lauten of Ward 

14, Howland of Ward 5. Drinan of Ward 6, Mc- 
Gahev of Ward 7. 

Judiciary-Crocker of Ward 9, Thompson of 
Warn 9, Richardson of Ward 10, Wolcott of Ward 
11, Colbv of Ward 18. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Spenceley of Ward 
19. 



BOA^u of A-L.dje:rm:en 



8 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 14, 1878. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., his 
Honor the Mayor in the chair. 

STANDING RULES OF THE BOARD. 

Alderman Harris submitted a report from the 
committee to examine the rules and orders adopt- 
ed on the 7th inst. — That no alterations are needed 
iD said rules and orders. Accepted. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 

The Mayor said that, in accordance with the 
rules just adopted, he would announce the follow- 
ing standing committees of the Board of Alder- 
men: 

Armories— Aldermen Slade, Harris, Perkins. 

Bridges— Aldermen Harris, McLean, Whiton. 

County Accounts— Aldermen Harris, Guild, Hay- 
den. 

Faneuil Hall and County BuildiDgs — Aldermen 
Slade, Whidden, McLean. 

Lamps— Aldermen Whiton, Peri- ins, Faunce. 

Licenses — Aldermen Stebbins, Guild, Faunce. 

Markets, Weights and Measures — Aldermen 
Slade, Viles, Harris. 

Paving— Aldermen Whidden, Slade, Robinson. 

Police— Aldermen Viles, Robinson, Whiton. 

Sewers — Aldermen Viles, Harris, Hayden. 

Steam Engines — Aldermen McLean, Whidden, 
Slade. 

Streets — Aldermen Perkins, Harris, Hayden. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Paving. Petitions for 
leave to move wooden buildings, by John Devine, 
from Keyes street to rear of same street, Ward 23; 
by M. Ellis & Co , Irom 331 Princeton street to 388 
Bennington street, Wardl. 

Mary Sullivan, for an abatement of the edge- 
stone assessment of $7.50 on estate 353 East Eighth 
street. Edwin R. Frost, for leave to erect a post 
in sidewalk 109-113 Devonshire street; John J. 
Garrity et al., that the name of Morni court be 
changed to Grafton street; R. T. Paine, Jr., that 
Ruggles street be graded. 

Cambridge Railroad Company, for leave to ex- 
tend their location to Milk street. 

To the Committee to Nominate Harbor Master. 
Daniel Baker, for appointment as Harbor Master. 

To the Joint Committee on Public Lands. Wil- 
liam Corbett, for leave to cancel his present bond 
for land on Chapman street and for the issue of a 
new bond. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS FROM THE COMMON 
COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Order requesting a copy of the Mayor's Address 
for publication. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for publication of Municipal Register, 
etc. Passed in concurrence. 

Order authorizing boards of government and 
heads of departments to present their annual re- 
ports in print. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for joint standing committees to resume 
the unfinished business of the last year. Passed 
in concurrence. 

Order for City Messenger to provide copies of 
city documents, when issued, to members of the 
City Council, and to issue indexes for the same. 
Passed in concurrence. 

Order that the action of committees be not 
made public until reported to either branch of 
City Council. Referred to Committee on Joint 
Rules aud Orders in concurrence. 

Auditor's exhibit ot the condition of the several 
appropriations on Jan. 1, 1878, (City Doc. No. 4), 
and report of Fire Commissioners on number and 
character of alarms of tire in December, 1877. 
Severally placed on file. 

An order for the Fire Commissioners to restore 
the rations to the crew of the fire boat came up to 
be referred to Committee on Fire Department. 



Alderman Stebbins said that before the order was 
even referred, it would be well to hear from the 
Fire Commissioners the reasons which leu to the 
change. On his motion the order was laid on the 
table, and he offered the following, which was 
passed : 

Ordered, That the Fire Commissioners he re- 
quested to communicate to the City Council their 
opinion as to the value and efficiency of the fire 
boat, and also the reasons for discontinuing the 
allowance for rations to the crew of said boat. 

Sent down. 

An order came down for Committee on Im- 
proved Sewerage to consider the subject of abat- 
ing the nuisance in the Roxbury Canal, and to in- 
quire if any further legislation is needed. Laid 
on the table, on motion of Alderman Stebbins, who 
offered the following, which was passed: 

Ordered, That the City Solicitor be requested to 
communicate to the City Council whether, in his 
opinion, the Board of Health are vested by law 
with ample power to abate any nuisance detri- 
mental to the public health which may exist in 
the so-called "Roxbury Canal." 

Sent down. 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Orders came up for the appointment of the sev- 
eral joint standing committees, in which the 
Board concurred and the committees were joined 
as follows: 

Assessors' Department — Aldermen Hayden, 
Guild, Faunce. 

Bathing — Aldermen Robinson, Whidden, Whit- 
on. 

Claims — Aldermen Stebbins, Harris, Faunce. 

Common— Alriermen Guild, Slade, Whiton. 

East Boston Ferries— Aldermen McLean, Viles, 
RobiDSon. 

Engineer's Department — Aldermen Robinson, 
Whidden. 

Fire Department — Aldermen Perkins, Hayden. 

Fuel— Aldermen Hayden, Whiton. 

Harbor — Aldermen Harris, McLean. 

Health— Aldermen Viles, Perkins. 

City Hospital- Aldermen Faunce, Whiton. 

Public Institutions— Aldermen Whiton, Hayden, 
Perkins. 

Legislative Matters— Aldermen Stebbins, Har- 
ris. 

Mt. Hope Cemetery— Aldermen Faunce, Guild. 

Ordinances — Aldermen Guild, Faunce, Hayden. 

Overseers of Poor — Aldermen Harris, McLean. 

Public Buildings— Aldermen Slade, Whidden, 
McLean. 

Public Instruction — Aldermen Hayden, Slade, 
Guild. 

Public Lands— Aldermen Faunce, Robinson. 

Printing— Aldermen Guild, Viles. 

Public Library— Aldermen Perkins, Faunce, 
Whiton. 

City Registrar's Department— Aldermen Viles, 
Perkins. 

Salaries — Aldermen Whidden, Stebbins. 

Streets — Aldermen Perkins, Harris, Hayden. 

Surveyor's Department — Aldermen Faunce, 
Guild. 

Survey and Inspection of Buildings — Aldermen 
McLeas", Viles. 

Treasury Department— Aldermen Whiton, Hay- 
den. 

Water— Aldermen Whiton, Robinson. 

JOINT SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

Orders came from the other branch for the ap- 
pointment of joint special committees, which 
were passed in concurrence, and the committees 
were joined as follows : 

Improved Sewerage— Aldermen Whidden, Steb- 
bins, Slade. 

Stony Brook— Aldermen Robinson, Viles, Mc- 
Lean. 

Public Parks — Aldermen Guild, Faunce. 

State Aid.— Aldermen McLean, Slade, Hayden. 

Mayor's Address— Aldermen Whidden, McLean. 

To see what can be done to provide employment 
for destitute resident citizens— Aldermen Whid- 
den, Guild. 

NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

An order came up tor joint special committees 
to nominate candidates tor the various city of- 
fices, in which the Board concurred, and the com- 
mittees were joined as follows: 

Overseers ot Poor— Aldermen Harris, McLean. 



9 



BOARD OF ALDREMEN 



Clerk of Committees— Aldermen Perkins, Hay- 
den. 

Harbor Master— Aldermen Harris, McLean. 

Superintendents of Bridges— Aldermen Whiton, 
McLean. 

Superintendent of Streets— Aldermen Whidden, 
Slade. 

Superintendent of Common, etc. — Aldermen 
Slade. McLean. 

Superintendent of Public Lands — Aldermen 
Faunce, Stebbins. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings— Aldermen 
Hayden, Slade. 

Superintendent of Sewers — Aldermen Viles. 
Robinson. 

City Architect— Aldermen Slade, Guild. 

City Surveyor— Aldermen (iuild, Faunce. 

City Messenger— Aldermen Whiton, McLean. 

City Registrar— Aldermen Hayden, Yiles. 

City Solicitor— Aldermen Guild, Harris. 

City Engineer— Aldermen Robinson, McLean. 

City Treasurer— Aldermen Stebbins, Faunce. 

City Collector— Vldermen Faunce, Stebbins. 

Auditor of Accounts — Aldermen Hayden, Mc- 
Lean. 

Water Registrar— Aldermen McLean, Hani>. 

Commissioner Sinking Funds— Aldermen Steb- 
bins, Guild. 

Commissioner Cedar Grove Cemetery— Alder- 
men Perkins. Robinson. 

Directors Public Institutions— Aldermen Whid- 
den, McLean. 

Directors East Boston Ferries— Aldermen Mc- 
Lean, Stebbins. 

Trustees City Hospital — Aldermen Guild, 
Faunce. 

Trustees Public Library — Aldermen Faunce, 
Whiton. 

Trustees Mt. Hope Cemetery— Aldermen Robin- 
son, Perkins. 

Weighers, etc., of Lighters— Aldermen Viles, 
Harris. 

KEPOETS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Superintendent of Lamps. Annual report, year 
ending Dec. 31, 1877: 

The increase in the number of the public lamps 
the past year has been the smallest for a number 
ol years, as will be seen by examination of the ac- 
companying tables. The" location ot lamps on 
Commercial and Tenean streets, Blue Hill avenue, 
Wheatland avenue and the vicinity in Dorchester, 
Hyde Park avenue, Keponset and Jamaica streets 
in West Roxbury, Madison square and Llewellyn 
avenue in Roxbury, Chelsea Bridge, Columbia and 
Brighton streets in Charlestown, West Chester 
park and Commonwealth avenue in the city prop- 
er, has required a considerable outlay, but most 
of the new lamps have been widely distributed 
over the city. 

The replacing of the old and worn-out small gas 
supplies by new and large pipes must be con- 
tinued to prevent leakage and consequent danger 
to persons and property. As a source of police 
protection, constantly increasing demands are 
made from year to year for the public lighting of 
rear passageways, 'in the older section of the 
city, while the numerous petitions for the light- 
ing of suburban streets requires the careful con- 
sideration of the department. 

There are public lamps now located on the Com- 
mon and squares of the city to the number of two 
hundred and fifty. The location of these lamps 
has been going on gradually for many years under 
the charge of, and at a very considerable expense 
to, this department, at the request of numerous 
citizens and the Police Department, as the public 
safety seemed to demand, and it is fair to pre- 
sume that, with the laying out of the new park, a 
greatly increased demand will be made for public 
lighting. The annual cost to this department of 
maintenance of the lamps now located on the 
Common and squares of the city amounts to near- 
ly ten thousand dollars, which should properly be 
charged to the department having the public 
parks in charge, as is the case in other large 
cities. 



This method of lighting up some of the impor- 
tant points of night travel, which, like Scollay's 
square, Park square and Post Office square, are 
very broad and unsafe for the pedestrian, has 
been adopted with favorable result on some of the 
squares in the city of New York, and in many of 
the larger cities of Europe, and is worthy of se- 
rious consideration. They may, with small ex- 
pense, be made ornamental as well as useful in 
our city. 

Price Paid jor Gas for Public Lamps. 

City proper $2.00 per thousand cubic feet. 

South Boston 2.40 " " " 

East Boston 2.40 " 

Boxburv 2.40 " " " 

Dorchester 2.90 " " '• 

Brookline 2.90 " " " 

Brighton 2.90 " " " 

West Roxburv 2.90 " " " 

Charlestown 2.40 " " " 

In the summer of 1876, at the suggestion of the 
then Committee on Lamps, the following reduc- 
tions were made in the price ot gas for the public 
lamps: 

City proper from 82.08y 3 per thousand to 82.00 

Roxbury " 2.60 " " " 2.45 

West Roxbury " 3.00 " " " 2.90 

Brookline " 3.00 " " " 2.90 

Brighton " 3.00 " " " 2.90 

Charlestown " 2.50 " " " 2.40 

Early in the year 1877, at the suggestion of the 
committee, thefollowing reduction in rates was 
made: 

In Roxbury, from $2.45 per thousand to 82.40 

South Boston, " 2.50 " " " 2.40 

EastBoston, " 2.50 2.40 

Dorchester, " 3.00 " " " 2.90 

The result of the deductions has amounted to 
over sixteen thousand dollars the past year. 

The public lamps are burned every night 
throughout the year, — a total of three thousand 
eight hundred forty-nine and one-half hours each. 

Employes. 

The number of men employed is one hundred 
and twenty-five, and there are no supernvmentni 
men. 

The men (one hundred and four in number) who 
light and clean the gas lamps are paid at the fol- 
lowing rates: City proper 41 men, South Boston 
7 men, East Boston 5 men, Charlestown 7 men, 
one and three-fourth cents per lamp per night; 
while in Roxbury 19 men, Dorchester 13 men, 
Brookline 1 ua an," Brighton 5 men, West Roxbury, 
6 men, are paid at the rate of one and sixty-seven 
one hundredths dollars per day. The men who 
light the oil and fluid lamps "are twenty-one in 
number. 

Sroken Lanterns. 

The number of lanterns which have been report- 
ed by the police as broken the past year was 324 

By the lamplighters 7,203 



Total 7,527 

Aeainst a total of 7444 in 1876, and a total of 8268 
in 1875. 

All repairs of lanterns are done by the depart- 
ment at its workshop on Albany street. At this 
shop there are four men permanently employed, 
and two who work at piece work on the painting 
of lanterns. In addition to the lanterns repaired 
as above, there have been 2485 lanterns painted, 
two coats, and 7847 iron posts repainted, one coat, 
during the year. 

Public Lamps. 

The following table will show the number of 
public lamps in the various sections of the city, 
on the 15th of December, 1877, as compared with 
the ten previous years : 



JANUARY 14, 1878. 



10 



o 



K 

Hi 

o 

o 

E 

>-•■ 

B 
a 



w 


a 




-r 


?--. 


S3 


V 


— 



3 o 



►n 


co 


N 


n 


o 


o 


to 


^ 




I- 


03 

el- 

hd 


<< 



© 

C7I 



o 

OI 



OS 

CO 

Or 

OS 



as 
o 



os 

00 
03 
-J 



00 



Ol 



-J 

Ci 
00 

to 



-3 



3- '< 



bd 
o 



OS 00 

*. -1 

tO CO 



1867. 



OS 00 
03 03 



o 



1868. 



00 CO OS 
O M CO 
50 O -4 



1869. 



H* 50 
-J 10 

*■ 50 



OS 
03 



1876. 



OS © 50 -1 
OI to © >-» 
H> O -J tO 



1871. 



-J M 

CI *■ 
CO M 



to 

oo 



1873. 



00 VO 50 
CO OI hf* 
CO M *- 



CO 



18?8. 



CO 
03 



to 

OS 
50 



00 CO 
00 OS 
O OI 



1874. 



M 






















© 
© 




CO 


© 


-] 


© 


*• 


© 


~1 


o 


1875. 


CO 


os 


CO 


-4 


M 


OI 


© 


CO 


© 


© 




CO 


© 


to 


Or 


lf>- 


*- 


h- 1 


to 


to 


*>■ 




M 






















w 




flt 


-3 


CO 


J- 1 

to 


M 
OI 


CO 


00 




1876. 


31 


OS 


hO 


*- 


h- 


CO 


OI 


to 


© 


to 




CO 


© 


*■ 


CO 


© 


© 


00 


o 


to 


-a 





© 



OI -1 © 
*• -1 -4 

CO to to 



CO © CO 



CO W 



1877. 



Increase of public lamps in ten years- 
Total increase in 1868 47 

1869 651 

" " 1870 245 

■ " ■' 1871 266 

" " 1872 317 

" " 1873 398 

" " 1874 1.764 

1875 747 

1876 1,265 

" " 1877 289 

Total 5,989 

Financial Condition of the Department. 

The balance of the appropriation on hand, 
from 1876, on the 1st of January, 1877, 
was #146,261 .58 

There was expended during the remainder 
of the financial year 132,461.36 



The balance unexpended and trans- 
ferred to other appropriations was 



813,800.20 



The appropriation for the financial year 

ending on the 30th o£ April next, was.... #490,000.00 
Amount expended to date. 334,098.72 

Balance unexpended #155,901.28 

An amount sufficient to meet all anticipated ex- 
penditures of the department for the remainder 
of the financial year. 

Superintendents of Mridges. Reports were re- 
ceived from Superintendents of Bridges giviug 
the number of vessels which passed through the 
draws of the several bridges during 1877, as fol- 
lows: 

Congress-street Bridge— 6340 steamers and tow 
boats, and 8010 sailing vessels passed through the 
draw— 14,350 in all. 

Dover-street Bridge— 5183 vessels passed through 
the draw. 

Mt. Washington-avenue Bridge— 10,452 vessels 
passed through the draw. 

Broadway Bridge— 5675 vessels. 

Chelsea-street Bridge— 3 vessels. 



Charles River Bridge — 7604 vessels. 

Cambridge-street Bridge, 716. 

Western-avenue Bridge, 657. 

Harvard-street Bridge, 307. 

Federal-street Bridge, 4715 vessels in the day- 
time, 2430 in the night, total 7145. 

Meridian-street Bridge, 2247 vessels. 

Maiden Bridge, 1086 vessels. 

Warren Bridge, 5484 vessels. 

Severally sent down. 

Inspectors of Lighters. Report for quarter end- 
ing Dec. 31, 1877 — Receipts, §804.50; expenses, 
$17.35. Sent down. 

Superintendents of North Scales. Report for 
quarter ending Dec. 31. 1877— Receipts, $617.85; 
paid into treasury, $220.97. Sent down. 

Paymaster of State Aid. Report for October, 
November and December, 1877— Disbursed, $19,- 
915; balance on hand, $550; number of applicants 
for three months, 3996. Sent down. 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS. 

A report was received from the Committee on 
Accounts, stating that they met on. Saturday, 12th 
inst., when Solomon B. Stebbins was elected 
chairman on the part of the Board of Aldermen, 
Roger Wolcott chairman on the part of the Com- 
mon Council, and John A. Kidney, clerk. Sent 
down. 

MAYOR'S CLERK. 

The Mayor submitted a communication giving 
notice of the appointment of James M. Bugbee as 
Mayor's Clerk. Sent down. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Alderman Perkins offered an order — That the 
Committee on Assessors' Department be request- 
ed to consider and report upon the expediency of 
abolishing; the office of Second Assistant Assessor. 
Passed. Sent down. 

PETITION FOR HEARING IN RELATION TO WORK 
FOR UNEMPLOYED CITIZENS. 

Alderman Stebbins presented a petition from 
M. J. Savage and over 1300 others, asking lor 
a public hearing in relation to the condition of 
the unemployed, and that proper measures be 
taken for their relief; representing that a very 
large number of citizens, who are capable, indus- 
trious, skilled and unskilled laborers, have been 
out of employment for a considerable period of 
time, in consequence of which they are upon the 
point of starvation at this inclement season of the 
year; and the petitioners believe that the interests 
of humanity demand that some measures be taken 
for their relief. 

Alderman Stebbins — The petitioners ask for a 
public hearing before the City Council. Of course 
members of the Board will at once see that it 
would be difficult to arrange for a meeting of both 
branches simply to hear these petitioners. I ap- 
prehend that what they desire can be best accom- 
plished by the reference of the petition to the 
joint special committee which has been joined 
this afternoon, before whom they can present 
their case at length and be heard by representa- 
tives of both branches better than in any other 
way. In this connection I desire to call attention 
to the fact that the present City Council find 
themselves somewhat embarrassed by the state of 
the appropriations. I also apprehend that the 
special committee will find it difficult to grant 
the prayer of the petitioners in view of this fact. 
I have compared the state of the four leadiug 
appropriations on Jan. 1. 1877 and 1878, and fiud 
that in 1877 the Paving Committee had a bal- 
ance to their credit of $141, 264.65; this year 
they have only $86,242.59. Sewer Depart- 
ment, last year, $8163.75; this year, 92,333.06. 
Health Department, last year, $147,035.63; this 
year $99,297.25. East Boston ferries, last, year, 
$67,701.74; this year, $37,388.46. These four de- 
partments employ the largest number of laborer-. 
Adding the total amounts for January 1, 1877 and 
1878, tor these departments, I find that while the 
City Council last year entered upon their duties 
with balances to the credit of these departments 
of $364,405.77, we have this year but $225,262.27, or 
$139,203.50 less than last year. I think it proper 
te state this fact publicly, so that the petitioners 
may see the almost utter impossibility of having 
any relief granted by the present City" Council un- 
til the annual appropriations are made. In fact, 
it will be very difficult for the departmentss to 
meet the three remaining monthly drafts of 
the present financial year without asking for ad- 
ditional appropriations. 



11 



BOARD OF ALDERMEJN 



On motion of Alderman Stebbins, the petition 
was referred to the Joint Special Committee on 
the Employment of Destitute Citizens. Sent down. 

MYSTIC VALLEY RAILROAD LOCATION. 

A petition was received from the Mystic Valley 
Railroad Corporation, for approval of" their route 
to and their terminus in this city; and an order 
of notice was passed for a hearing thereon on 
Feb. 4 at four o'clock P. M. 

PROPOSED REDUCTION OF TIME OF BURNING 
PUBLIC LAMPS. 

Alderman Harris offered an order— That the 
Committee on Lamps consider and report on the 
expediency of dispensing with the burning of 
a portion of the street lamps during: the hours 
from midnight until morning. Passed. 

LICENSES FOR MINORS, ETC. 

Alderman Stebbins olfered an order— That the 
Board of Alderman be and they are hereby au- 
thorized, in accordance with section 14, chapter 
50, of the General Statutes, to make rules and reg- 
ulations to restrain sales by minors; or to grant 
licenses for minors to make such sales, on such 
terms and conditions as they shall prescribe. 
Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

PAYMENT OF EXECUTIONS. 

Alderman Stebbins offered an order— That the 
Committee on Claims be authorized to draw upon 
the Treasurer by special dratt in the usual form 
for the payment ot all executions or judgments of 
court against the city when properly certified as 
correct by the City Solicitor. Read twice and 
passed. Sent down. 

BILLS TO BE APPROVED. 

Alderman Stebbins offered an order — That the 
Chairman ot the Board of Aldermen be authorized 
to approve bills for expenses incurred by the 
Board of Aldermen and the standing committees 
of the Board not having charge ot any appropria- 
tions, also by individual members of this Board 
while engaged in the discharge ot official duty; 
the amount of said bills to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Contingent Fund of the Board of 
Aldermen. Read twice and passed. 



UNCOLLECTABLE TAXE8. 

Alderman Stebbins offered an order — That 
bis Honor the Mayor be authorized to peti- 
tion the General Court, now in session, for 
the passage of an act making it the duty of 
the City Collector, whenever it becomes necessary 
for the settlement of the annual tax warrants 
committed to his custody for collection by the 
Board of Assessors, and whenever such settle- 
ments cannot be made by reason of death, removal 
from the city, insolvency or other cause, of persons 
upon whom assessment for poll taxes or taxes on 
personal property has been made, not exceeding in 
amount $15, and which cannot be collected, to 
appear beiore the said Board of Assessors and 
present a statement of such uncollectable taxes, 
and make oath of bis inability to collect the same 
for cause, as aforesaid, whereupon the said Board 
shall certify said statement to the City Auditor 
and to the said Collector for the settlement of the 
taxes so assessed. 

Alderman Stebbins— I shall move the reference 
of the order to the Committee on Legislative Mat- 
ters, and in doing so I wish to state why it is 
offered so early in the year. The City Collector 
finds himself embarrassed by a large number of 
outstanding poll taxes running back to 1822. He 
and his bondsmen are held responsible for the 
tax warrants committed to his care from year to 
year. There seems to be no way at present of re- 
lieving him from this amount of" uncollectable 
taxes. In many of the towns throughout the Com- 
monwealth it is an annual custom to take action 
in order to settle such taxes, or to balance the 
Collector's books. Such a custom has never been 
had in the city of Boston, and the present Collect- 
or finds himself embarrassed by an enormous 
amount of poll taxes against persons who 
have either died, left the city, become insolvent 
or cannot be t ound. The Collector informs me that 
there are at present on his books, from 1822 to 
1870, inclusive, 700,610 poll taxes due the city of 
Boston. There is no way to settle these taxes or 
balance the accounts except bv authority of 
the Legislature as indicated in that order. "The 
form of the order meets the concurrence of the 
City Collector and the Board of Assessors. It 
seems to be the only way to settla this vast amount 
of taxes from the books. I move the reference of 
the order to the Committee on Legislative Mat- 
ters, for them to consider and possibly amend and 
put in better shape than it now is. 

The order was referred to the Joint Committee 
on Legislative Matters. Sent down. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Viles. 



12 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 
January 17, 1878. 



Regular meeting at 7 1 .. o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Fope, President, in the chair. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN. 

Reports of city officers. Placed on rile. 

Mayor's message, appointing James M. Bugbee 
Mayor's Clerk. Placed on file. 

Certificate of the election of Solomon B. Steb- 
bins, Chairman, and John A. Kidney, Clerk, of 
the Committee on Accounts. Placed on file. 

Reference to the Committee on Legislative Mat- 
ters of an order for the Mayor to petition for an 
act of the Legislature in regard to certain uncol- 
lectable taxes, as therein set forth. Concurred. 

Order for the Board of Aldermen to make rules, 
etc., for sales by minors and to grant licenses for 
such sales. Read twice and passed in concur- 
rence. 

Order for Committee on Claims to draw on the 
Treasurer for payment of executions and judg- 
ments against the city. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for a report to be made on expediency of 
abolishing the office of Second Assistant Assessor. 
Read twice and passed in concurrence. 

Order for the opinion of Fire Commissioners on 
value and efficiency of the tire boat, and the reas- 
ons for discontinuing the allowance for rations 
for the crew. Read twice and passed in concur- 
rence. 

ROXBURY CANAL. 

An order came down for the City Solicitor to 
comrauuicate his opinion as to the legal power of 
the Board of Health to abate the Roxbury Canal 
nuisance. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I don't know as I 
desire to oppose the passage of this order; but I 
do desire to say that I think it is a mistake to 
substitute it for the order which originated in this 
branch. It must be evideut that the City Solici- 
tor will be perfectly unable to give an "opinion 
without knowing what the necessities for abating 
that nuisance are— in other words, what must be 
done; and the order passed here was intended to 
ascertain, in the first place, what was necessary 
to be done— whether to take a large tract of land, 
as laid down in the act of 1877, or whether it 
could be filled up and damages paid; wheth- 
er the sewage should be diverted from the 
canal, and the canal be dredged out and remain 
there. The City Solicitor was beard today to say 
(I think I am revealing no secrets) it would be 
impossible for him to determine whether the 
Board of Health had power to abate that nuisance 
until he knew what was necessary to be done 
there. It is plain that the Board ot Health could 
have no right under the statutes or ordinances to 
enter upon the building of one or two large sew- 
ers, at an expense of ¥60,000 or $ 05, 000; neither 
would they have the right to take a tiaot 
of land for that purpose. I think the 
order before us was the result of a misapprehen- 
sion of the exigencies ot that case, and ot the 
facts; but possibly it may be the best way to let it 
pass, and let the City Solicitor answer it if he can, 
though I thiuk it will postpone the direct meas- 
ures and action which are necessary to abate that 
nuisance. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5— I hardly know what it is 
best to do with that order, in the condition that 
Roxbury Canal is now, and the matter stands; 
but there is this much, the Board of Health have 
had this before them for three years, and they 
haven't seen their way clear to commence it. 
There has always been one lawyer ou the board, 
and now there are two," and they don't 
see any way in which they can attack so 
big a subject as the Roxbury Canal. As it is 
well alone in the season, and as we had this mat- 
ter in such a shape as to attack Roxbury Canal, 
I cannot see any reason for the passage of the or- 
der from the other Board. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9—1 cannot see what harm 
can be done by passing this order. I understand 
that certain gentlemen think the City Solicitor 
will give an opinion that will throw some light 
upon this matter. Whether or not the Board of 



Health can abate this nuisance, is a question of 
law and fact. As the gentleman from Ward 10 
says, the City Solicitor cannot settle the questions 
ot tact; but there are certain questions of law 
which he can give an opinion upon. Assuming 
that certain facts exist, he can state what the 
powers of the Board of Health are and what thev 
can do to prevent the nuisance. As this order 
has passed the other Boaid, and if we pass it 
here, it would go before the City Solicitor to- 
morrow, it will make no particular delay. As we 
should have an answer in a few days, I can see no 
barm in asking for the opinion before we finally 
vote. It may give us some valuable inrormation, 
ami it that is so, it will be desirable to pass the 
order. 

The order was read a second time and passed in 
concurrence. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

On motion of Mr. Barnard of Ward 24, the rule 
was suspended and he submitted a report from 
the committee to nominate candidates for Fi- 
nance Committee, recommending the election of 
the members originally reported by them, viz., 
Eugene H. Sampson, J. Homer Fierce, Moses W. 
Richardson. Heury F. Coe, George L. Thorndike, 
George B. Webster, Francis J. Ward. The report 
was accepted an-l an election ordered. Commit- 
tee—Messrs. Thompson of \\ aid 9, Wjraan of 
Ward 21, Sawyer of Ward 24. 

Whole nun ber of votes 68 

Necessary for a choice 35 

Kusrene H. Sampson 63 

.1. Homer Pierce n.s 

Moses W. Richardson 66 

Henry F. Coe 68 

George L. Thorndike 0" 

George B. Webster 61 

Francis J. Ward 65 

.lames B. Richardson 4 

Peter S. Roberts (i 

James B. Danforth 1 

A. 8. Brown 1 

And the first seven were elected. 

JOINT BULBS AM' ulillEllS. 

The order adopting the joint rules and orders 
(City Documents) was taken up at eight o'clock, 
by special assignment, the question being on its 
passage. 

Mr. Pierce of Ward 24— There is a provision in 
rule 20, in regard to bills lor refreshments, which 
may he open to a little misunderstanding. It 
specifics that no bill for refreshments shall be ap- 
proved by the presiding officer of any board, or 
chairman of a committee, "which includes 
anione its items liquors or cigars, or 
any bill lor refreshments furnished to any 
person not a member of such board or 
committee, unless specially authorized to do so by 
vote of such board or committee." It. is not gen- 
erally provided that the items of a bill shall be 
specified, and it occurred to me that a bill might 
not show that liquors or cigars were furnished, 
when they actually were. I therefore offer the 
lollowing as a substitute for the second part of 
rule 20: 

"No expenditure for liquors or cigars shall be 
approved by the presiding officer ot a board or 
chairman ot a committee, or any bill for refresh- 
ments furnished to any person not a member of 
such board or committee, unless authorized to do 
so by such board or committee." 

It "takes the ulace ol the second portion of rule 
20. 

Mr. Crocker of W T ard 9— The committee have 
made a little discrepancy in their report, as stated 
on pages 2 and 7, and to render the amendment 
of the gentleman more plain and bring about a 
better result, I suggest the striking out of the 
words "among its items," and inserting "any 
charge for." 

Mr. Pierce accepted the amendment of Mr. 
Crocker. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 1G— I move to strike out the 
words "liquors or cigars." Although I don't use 
either liquors or cigars, I think that when a com- 
mittee meet, if one of the members wishes to 
indulge modestly in a glass of wine, I think be 
has as much right to that as he has to solid re- 
freshments. As I do not use either liquor or 
Cigars, I feltthaujit would be better for me to offer 
this amendment than one who does use them. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9— The amendment 
touche- the vital point in this matter. The opin- 
ion of the citizens of Boston has been shown very 
clearly that they are opposed to the illegal ex- 
penditure of the city's money for junketing of 
this class. I do not believe a majority, or any 



JANUARY 17 



1878 



13 



large portion, of the citizens of Boston, ob- 
ject to reasonable expenditures for carriage 
hire or dinners for committees engaged 
upon work of the city ; but there has 
been a strong feeling against committees 
going to an extravagant expense for liquors and 
cigars. One result of the last section has been the 
proposed changes in the rule. As gentlemen well 
know, aU through last year we were squabbling 
over amendments to the rules to prevent this 
thing, and it is a very healthy sign to see an at- 
tempt to get rid of it at the beginning of the year. 
I hope the substitute will pass, for I think it will 
have a good effect. I do not think the 
citizens care for the items ; it is the 
principle involved. The people are willing to 
pay millions to pay interest on' the debt, and 
make necessary public improvements; but they 
are not willing* to spend hundreds of dollars for 
things of thi- kind, for when you once admit the 
principle that such expenditures can be made, you 
open the door to any amount. 

Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11 — I hope the amend- 
ment of the gentleman from Ward 16 will not 
pass. When the committee assembled there was 
found to be a strong feeling against any 
such expenditures for liquors or cigars 
being allowed by the City Government. 
It was first proposed to recommend a 
rule prohibiting such expenditure; but the ma- 
jority of the committee were of the opinion that 
under certain circumstances such au expenditure 
would be proper. They wished to strengthen the 
hands of the joint committee, and gentlemen will 
notice that the rale leaves the matter in the hands 
of the committee. Cases have occurred in the 
past when a bill has been presented to 
the chairman of a committee and be has per- 
sistently refused for weeks to approve it; but, 
owing to great outside pressure, he has done so 
with extreme reluctance. It will be noticed that, 
under this rule, any proper bill for liquors or 
cigars will be presented at the next meeting of 
the committee and passed upon as routine busi- 
ness; and when the chairman is convinced that it 
is not a proper bill to approve, the committee can 
reject it, and the chairman can say, I have 
nothing to do with it, the committee refused 
to pass it. The matter is left entirely 
in the hands of the committee. I do 
not think the rule will change the attitude of any 
proper expenditure of this kind, but I think it 
will check the improper use of liquor and cigars. 
I hope the amendment of the gentleman from 1 
Ward 16 will not be adopted. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5— This matter took con- 
siderable time in the committee. One day was n't 
enough, and we adjourned to another day. It 
was all about sustaining the inner man during his 
arduous labors. My associate has stated pre- 
cisely what the committee intended to do. I 
have known cases where the chairman hur- 
riedly approved a bill. We want the com- 
mittee to understand and vote upon the bills in 
some form. We have got to trust men while liv- 
ing. If committees have wine and cigars it is 
their business. The people send us here to spend 
ten millions of dollars; if they trust us to so 
great an extent, we ought to trust committees 
with these small affairs. 1 think the report cov- 
ers all that can be done. These technical terms 
may not be right ; I am not a lawyer, or the son 
of a lawyer, and if anything can be done to make 
the rule more plain, I hope it will be done. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— Will the chairman 
be kind enough to enlighten me and the Council 
what is meant by liquors ? 

Mr. Sibley— I suppose it is something a little 
stronger and more reviving than water. It is 
more expensive than water. Some people object 
to it, and don't think much of it. 

Mr. McGaragle— The explanation is far from 
satisfactory. Many members of the Council do 
not drink liquor, but if they see fit to call for a 
bottle of mineral water that costs more than a 
glass of liquor, I should like to know if they are 
debarred from that privilege? [Mr. McGaragle 
paused; the President was about to put the 
question and Mr. McGaragle continued.] If 
the chairman don't see fit to answer the 
question I shall oppose the order. If the 
rule allows members who do not drink to 
call for Apollinaris water which costs sixty- 
five cents, and prevents others from calling for 
a glass of whiskey which costs only fifteen cents. 
I don't propose to consent to anything of the 
kind. I intend that all shall be free and equal, so 
far as eating and drinking are concerned. If there 



is to be exclusivenesshere, I am not in for it; if 
there is to be total prohibition, I am in for it. If 
some are to be allowed to use Apollinaris water, 
and others not to use liquor, I am opposed to it. 
If the committee do not satisfactorily explain it, 
I shall move an additional section, to exclude all 
drinks. 

Mr. Wolcott— I trust this will be met in a fair 
way. It is not a prohibition of Apollinaris water 
or anything else. It is simply left to the commit- 
tee. Any committee that would approve a bill 
for Apollinaris water would not object to liquor. 
The Committee on Rules and Orders did not in- 
tend to make it prohibitory. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 11— Without entering 
into any discussion of this matter, I would ask 
the attention of the gentleman from Ward 11 to 
section 20 on the seventh page, which seems to 
prohibit the presiding officer of a board or chair 
man of a committee iroiri approving any bill for 
refreshments on any day other than the day of 
meeting of such committee, or any bill which in- 
cludes among its items liquors or cigars. I mere- 
ly ask for an explanation. 

Mr. Flynn's amendment to strikeout wines and 
cigars was lost. 

Mr. Pierce's amendment [in the form of Mr. 
Crocker's substitute] was rejected. 

Mr. Crocker — Gentlemen must belaboring under 
a mistake, as there is no objection to the cbange, 
which is merely verbal and to make the rule more 
effective. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 moved to amend by 
striking out all of the rule relating to approval of 
bills for refreshments, liquors and cigars. 

Mr. Barry of Ward 22 asked Mr. Spenceley's rea- 
sons for offering the amendment. 

Mr. Spenceley--So much has been said about it 
in the two years I have been in the Council, that I 
am tired ot hearing about it, and it is a pretty 
good time to find out whether or not this City 
Government want any refreshments, and whether 
we had n't better do away with them altogether. 
I would like to have it decided once tor all 
whether this City Council wants refreshments or 
not, and to do so I call for a yea and nay vote. 

Mr. McGaragle— If that amendment is adopted 
will it prevent members of the City Council from 
going junketing at large, without anyoody to ap- 
prove bills? 

Mr. Coe of Ward 24—1 was about to ask the same 
question; whether it would not leave committees 
free to junket to an unlimited extent, there being 
no rule against it. 

Mr. Spenceley's amendment was rejected. 

Mr. Thompson moved to strike out the clause 
providing for refreshments on any day other than 
the day of the committee meeting, adding, The 
rule, as explained, evidently gives authority to 
approve bills for refreshments furnished when 
there is no committee meeting. I cannot con- 
ceive of a case when it would be right to approve 
a bill for carriages or refreshments when there 
was no committee meeting. There may be in- 
stances, and if I am wrong I may be corrected. 
Unless I am wrong I would take away;that power. 

Mr. Wolcott— If 1 understand the amendment 
correctly it forbids the approval of bills for le- 
freshments furnished on days other than meet- 
ings of the committee. That was discussed in 
the committee; statements were made that fre- 
quently members were appointed upon sub-com- 
mittees to visit distant places and do work that 
required carriages and refreshments to sustain 
their bodily strength. It was felt that any proper 
charges submitted before a committee would be 
approved, but if a member put in an improper 
bill of that kind, the committee would throw it 
out. I do not think the rule is open to the objec- 
tion raised by the gentleman. Every bill will 
come up on its merits; proper ones will be ap- 
proved, and improper ones thrown out. 

Mr. Pierce of Ward 24 moved to reconsider the 
vote whereby his amendment was rejected, add- 
ing—Gentlemen can hardly have understood its 
meaning, or else there is more reason to make 
the change than I supposed there was; because if 
there is a feeling that those words should be there 
there may be danger that they will be taken ad- 
vantage of in some instances to make the approv- 
al of such bill by the chairman legal when it 
would not be within the meaning of the rule as I 
understand it. Therefore I move to reconsider, 
and upon that motion I call for the yeas and 
nays. 
Mr. Thompson's amendment was rejected. 

Mr. Pierce's motion to reconsider was lost. 

Mr. Day of Ward 4 believed the committee had 



1+ 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



presented the best thing the Council can put upon 
its rules, and therefore he moved the previous 
question. 

Mr. Thompson objected to hurrying the matter; 
the rule was not strong enough. 

Mr. McGaragle hoped every gentleman would 
have a chance to express his mind. 

Mr. Day said several amendments had been dis- 
posed of, and the majority evidently desired to 
adopt the report. 

The main question was ordered, and Mr. Thomp- 
son called for a division of the question, desiring 
to act on rule 20 separately by yea and nay vote, 
and pass the rest of the order. 

The order, except rule 20, was passed. 

Mr. Thompson called for the yeas and nays on 
rule 20, which were not ordered. 

Mr. Barnard said it was not customary to have 
the bills itemized, and asked it a bill could be ap- 
proved for liquors or cigars that did not give the 
items. 

Mr. Wolcott said the phraseology was wrong. 
It referred to a proposed change nearer the be- 
ginning of rule 20, which was not adopted, and to 
which this referred. He had hoped the amend- 
ment of Mr. Pierce would be adopted, as it would 
improve the phraseology. 

Mr. Spenceley desired the matter tojlie over un- 
til after the ordinance offered last year relating to 
salaries could be acted upon, and he moved to lay 
on the table, which the President ruled out of 
order. 

Rule 20 was declared adopted. Mr. Spenceley 
doubted the vote, and on his motion the yeas and 
nays were ordered. 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, B. Briutnall, 
N. 5T. Briutnail, Clapp, Coe, Colby, Crocker, Dan- 
forth, Day, Devlin, Feruald, Hani, Hibbard, Hol- 
lis, Howland, Lovering, McDonald, McGahey, Mc- 
Garagle, McGeough, Mullen, O'Connor, Pearl, Per- 
ham, Pierce, Plimpton, J. B. Richardson, M. W. 
Richardson, Roberts, Rosnosky, Rust, E. H.Samp- 
son, O. H. Sampson, Santry, H. N. Sawyer, N. 
Sawyer, Shepard, Sibley, Smith, J. F. Taylor, J. 
Taylor, Thorudike, Toppan, Ward, Webster, 
Whicher, AVilson, Wolcott, Woolley, W'yman— 50. 

Nays- .Messrs. Barry, Brawley, Burke, Cannon, 
Cox. Denny, Doherty, Drynan, Flynn, Hill, Ken- 
dricken. Kidney, Lauten, Mowry, Mullane, Nason, 
Roach, Spenceley, Thompson— 20. 

Absent or not voting— Mr. Kelley— 1. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— Petition of Robert 
Paget for leave to place boats on the Public Gar- 
den pond. Referred to Joint Committee on Com- 
mon. Sent up. 

By Mr. James C. Tucker, to be refunded money 
paid for tax title. Referred to Joint Committee 
on Claims. Sent up. 

NOMINATIONS. 

Reports of nominating committees were sub- 
mitted as follows: 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 reported the names of 
Alderman Clinton Viles and COuncilmen Eugene 
H. Sampson and Edwin Sibley as Directors of 
Public Institutions. 

Mr. Hill of Ward 14 reported the names of Al- 
derman Charles Hayden and Councilmen Charles 
S. Perham and Benjamin Brintnall as Trustees of 
Mt. Hope Cemetery. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 reported the names of Al- 
derman Curtis Guild and Council men H. N. Shep- 
ard and H. F. Coe as trustees of the Public 
Library. 

Mr. Hibbard of Ward 17 reported the names of 
Alderman Samuel C. Perkins and Councilmen 
C. J. Spenceley and Peter S. Roberts as trustees 
of the City Hospital. 

Mr. Roberts of Ward 4 reported the names of 
Alderman Charles R. McLean and Councilmen 
Salmon P. Hibbard and Edward Pearl as directors 
of the East Boston Ferries. 

Reports severally accepted. Sent up. 

ELECTIONS. 

Mr. Sampson submitted the following from the 
Standing Committee on Elections: 

Report on petition of C. M. Winch et al., that 
they have recounted the original ballots cast for 
Common Council in Ward 16, with the following 
result: 

John Taylor 942 

Dennis A. Flynn 884 

Isaac Rosnosky 878 

J. Amherst Whitmore 806 

Hillard L. Goodale 753 



William Pelkus 713 

Joseph Moritz 56 

J, Avery Richards 10 

William Perkins 10 

Andrew Jackson 2 

and J. A. Richardson, James F. Mars ton, Eugene 
H. Sampson, Jesse L. Nason, Salmon P. Hibbard, 
Rosnosky, Isaac Rosnoskey, one each. 

It appears that the members now occupying 
seats at the Board from that ward are elected. 
Accepted. 

Report on petition of Dudley Pray et al. for re- 
count of ballots in Ward 13, and that the ballots 
be compared with the check lists, that they have 
no authority to recount any votes except for 
members of the Council, and as it does not ap- 
pear that the seat of any member from that ward 
is contested, it is not in the nower of the commit- 
tee to grant the request of the petitioners. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 offered the usual order for 
the Superintendent of Health to contract tor and 
purchase supplies and horses for that department 
during the present financial year. Ordered to a 
second reading. 

.JOINT RULES AGAIN. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 moved a reconsideration 
of the vote whereby the joint rules and orders 
were adopted, intending to renew the amend- 
ment to correct the mistake evidently made, and 
so stated by the gentleman from Ward 11. 

Mr. Sibley favored the reconsideration, as the 
amendment was a verbal one. 

On motion of Mr. Thompson the yeas aud nays 
ordered, and the reconsideration prevailed— yeas 
40, nays 30. 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Brawley, Brown, Clapp, 
Coe, Colby, Crocker, Danforth, Ham, Hibbard, 
Hill, Hollis, Howland, Kendricken, Kidney, Lov- 
ering, McGeough, Mowry, Nason, Pearl, Perham, 
Pierce, Plimpton, Roberts, Rust, EL N. Sawyer, 
N. Sawyer, Shepard, Sibley, Smith, Spenceley, J. 
Taylor, Thompson, Toppan, Ward. Webster, 
Whicher, "Wilson, Wolcott, Wyman 40. 

Nays— Messrs. Barry, B. Brintnall, N. Y. Brint- 
nall," Burke, Cannon, Cox, Day, Denny, Devlin, 
Doherty, Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, Lauten, Mc- 
Donald, McGahey, McGaragle, Mullane, Mullen, 
O'Connor, J. B. Richardson, M. W. Richardson, 
Roach, Rosnosky, E. H. Sampson, O. H. Samp- 
son, Santry, J. F. Taylor, Thorndike, Woolley— 30. 

Absent or not voting — Mr. Kelley— 1. 

Mr. Crocker moved to amend rule 20 by strik- 
ing off "s" from "includes," and striking out 
"among its items" so that it would read "bill . for 
refreshments which include liquors or cigars." 

Mr. Barry of Ward 22—1 wish to call the atten- 
tion of the Council to the fact that when the gen- 
tleman asked for a reconsideration it was to offer 
one amendment; and now he has put in a differ- 
ent one from what he told the Council he would 
put in. 

Mr. Crocker— I did intend to offer the exact 
amendment I proposed before; but the President 
has stated that be should rule that amendment 
out of order, and I therefore offer this one, which, 
though different, will have the same effect. 

Mr. Barnard— I do not see that we are to have 
the items any more than we did belore. I do not 
see how the gentleman is to find out whether 
wines or liquors are charged in the bill. 

Mr.- Brawley of Ward 19— We have listened to a 
good deal of debate upon this question, and I 
don't see that we have accomplished anything. 
We have had some legal debate, but I do not see 
that the grammatical construction of the order 
has been practically improved. If tbey do not 
put in items, I don't" see how you are going to ex- 
clude liquors. I should like to know what the 
gentleman means — whether to exclude liquors or 
to put them in? I am in favor of excluding 
liquors, and if be will fix such an amendment I 
will vote for it. I should like to know what is to 
be gained by this? 

Mr. Crocker— 1 did not offer the amendment 
originally, and thought it had been sufficiently 
explained. My object is to render it impossible 
for chairmen of committees to approve bills for 
refreshments which include liquors and cigars, 
unless the committee specially vote to authorize 
him to do so. That is the intention of the Com- 
mittee on Joint Rules ; that is my desire ; and I 
suppose it to be the wish of the Council. This 
amendment originated with the gentleman from 
Ward 24. There is nothing in the rule requiring 
bills to be set out with items, and it is not custom- 
ary for bills to contain items, but simply to say 



JANUARY 17 



1878 



15 



refreshments furnished A, B and C— that is the 
way the bills from Parker's come in — and, as the 
rule stands now, although there may be a charge 
for liquors or cigars, and the chairman may know 
it, he could approve the bill. It is not desirable 
that a simple and easy way should be left open to 
the chairman of a committee who wanted to ap- 
prove oills.for liauors and cigars furnished to his 
committee. It was admitted by the committee 
that, under the rule, a chairman might say, "I 
see no item for liquors or cigars. I know that 
half of it is actually for liquor, but, as I can see 
no item of this sort, I will approve it." In order 
to prevent the chairman of a committee from 
dodging the rule in that way— if he should be in- 
clined to do so— it was proposed to alter the rule so 
as not to authorize the approval of any bill which 
included liquors or cigars; so that the chairman, 
when the bill is presented for approval, if he 
knows that the refreshments actually included 
liquors or cigars, it will be his duty under the 
rule to withhold his approval without special vote 
of the committee. That, 1 understand, is the de- 
sire of the Council, and I cannot think any gentle- 
man would object to the change. The whole 
trouble has arisen from a misapprehension of the 
change. It is simply to remedy an error in the 
phraseology of the rule. 

On motion of Mr. Pierce of Ward 24, the yeas 
and nays were ordered on the amendment. 

Mr. Hibbard of Ward 17 moved to recommit 
rule 20 to the committee, with instructions to 
report an amendment which would affect this 
matter. 

Mr. Barry — There has been a great deal of 
buncombe talk about this mattei both last year 
and this year; and as members desire to secure 
newspaper fame for economy, I want my share of 
it. In sporting parlance, I will see the gentle- 
man and go him'one better, and offer the follow- 
ing as a substitute. I believe in economy. I 
move to strike out all of rule 20 and insert the 
following as a substitute: 

"All committees desiring refreshments shall ap- 
ply to the City Council therefor." 

Mr. Wolcott objected to a recommittal, believ- 
ing the committee M'ould not report any change. 
This amendment is verbal and does not affect the 
rule. 

The motion to recommit was lost. 

Mr. Barry — If my substitute is adopted, we can 
see who is in favor of junketing. If committees 
desire refreshments, the gentleman from Ward 9 
can find out who takes a hand in it, and we can 
find out who the junketing members are. 

Mr. Barry's substitute was lost. 

On motion of Mr. Coe, the main question was 
ordered. 

Mr. Crocker's amendment was adopted— yeas 
40, nays 30: 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, N. Y. Brintnall, 
Clapp, Coe, Colby, Crocker, JDanforth,Ham, Hib- 
bard, Hill, Hollis, Howland, Kendncken, Lover- 
ing, McGeougb, Mowry, Nason,_Pearl, Perham, 
Pierce, Plimpton, Roberts, Rust, r<i. H. Sampson, 
H. N. Sawyer. N. Sawyer, Shepard, Sibley, Smith, 
Spenceley," J. Taylor, Thompson, Toopan, Ward, 
Webster, Whicher, Wilson, Wolcott, Wyman— 40. 

Nays— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, 
Burke, Cannon, Cox, Day, Denny, Devlin, Doher- 
ty, Drynau, Fernald, Flynn, Kidney, Lauten, Mc- 
Donald, McGahey, McG-aragle, Mullane, Mullen, 
O'Connor, J. B. Richardson, M. W. Richardson, 
Roach, Rosnosky, O. H. Sampson, Santry, J. F. 
Taylor, Thorndike, Woolley— 30. 

Absent or not voting— Mr. Kelley— 1. 

The order, as amended, was passed. Sent up. 

BILLS TO BE APPROVED. 

Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11 offered an order— That 
all bills for refreshments or carriage hireincurred 
by the Common Council, the standing committees 
of the Common Council not having charge of any 
appropriation, or individual members of the Com- 
mon Council while in the discharge of official 
duty, give the names of the persons incurring the 
same, and after having been approved by the 
committee, or certified to by the members who in- 
curred the same, the President of the Common 
Council is authorized to approve the same, as pro- 
vided in the annual appropriation order under the 
head of Contingent Fund of the Common Council; 
and the Auditor of Accounts is authorized to allow 
the same for payment; provided, that no bill shall 
be approved by the President unless it shall be 
presented to h'im for approval before the end of 
the month next succeeding that within which the 
expenses covered by such bill were incurred. 



Mr. Wolcott explained that the order is the 
same as passed last year, and he offered it as 
chairman of the Committee on Accounts. 

The order was read twice and passed. Sent up. 

PAY OF A DISABLED FIREMAN. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 offered an order — 
That the Treasurer be and he is hereby authorized 
to accept the receipt of Henrietta Brooks, wife of 
Charles Brooks, for the amount allowed her hus- 
band by the City Council, December 18, 1878, as 
compensation for personal injuries received while 
in the discharge of his duties as fireman; said 
Charles Brooks being mentally incapacitated 
from signing the receipt therefor. Read twice 
and passed. Sent up. 

ARMY AND NAVY MEMORIAL. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 offered an order— That 
the Joint Standing Committee on Printing be re- 
quested to consider and report upon the expedi- 
ency of printing a new edition of the Army and 
Navy Monument Memorial for the use of the City 
Council. 

Mr. Spenceley said there had been very many 
calls for the memorial, and he hoped the commit- 
tee would be allowed to consider the subject and 
report. 

The order was read twice and passed. Sent up. 

PROPOSED CHANGE IN TERM OF MAYOR AND 
CITY COUNCIL, AND SALARIES FOR THE LAT- 
TER. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 offered an order — 
That his Honor the Mayor be requested to peti- 
tion the General Court at its present session for 
an act providing that the Mayor of the city of 
Boston be elected for a term 6f two years; also, 
for an act providing that the Aldermen of the city 
of Boston be elected for a term of three years; 
that they devote their whole time to the city, and 
that they receive a salary for said services; also, 
for an act providing that the Common Council of 
the city of Boston be elected for a term of three 
years, and that they be paid a salary for their 
services. 

Mr. Spenceley— Some members will recollect 
that last year I put in an order similar, but as it 
was late, and as the order would take a great deal 
of discussion, I let it go over to this year. As this 
order contemplates a great change in the City 
Government, I will simply give a few reasons why 
1 think it will be better to elect the Mayor, 
Aldermen and Councilmen for a term of years. 
The first question that arose was, Would* it be 
for the best benefit of the city of Boston to have 
this change; and I said, Yes, 'for several reasons. 
First, on account of experience. There is no 
doubt that experience is a good thing, especially 
in city affairs ; and in that view it would be a 
greatbenefit to the city, though I suppose that 
reason alone will not be sufficient to pass it. An- 
other point is, we would have only one-third the 
number of men to elect each year, and the chances 
would be in favor of getting better candidates. 
I do not say this with any disrespect to Aldermen 
or Councilmen who have been elected in past 
years. If we had to elect only one man in three 
years in a wara where we now elect three 
men for one year, I have no doubt we 
would look around carefully and select the 
best man that could be found in the 
ward. Another and a very essential point, and 
one that we have been talking about, is economy. 
Old and new members have refused to vote $5 
for badges, ana it seems to me that if we can have 
this experience it will be still more economical 
for the city of Boston, by the knowledge which 
members will obtain. Another point is, it will 
insure more independence of action. Gentlemen 
may say they would n't be trammelled by any- 
body; but I will admit that I might be myself. A 
man coming here for three years will be'rnore in- 
dependent than he would if he came for only 
one year. Another point is, better legisla- 
tion; "and experience would give us this. lam 
only naming these points as they come along. 
Any scheme presented to the City Council would 
receive better attention if members are elected 
for three years than it would if they are elected 
for one year. Another question refers more di- 
rectly to the Aldermen than to the Common 
Council : Does the office of Alderman require men 
elected thereto to give their whole time to the city ? 
That is a very pertinent question. I have nothing 
to say against the Aldermen whom I have met in 
the past two years. I say all honor to the men 
who can and will leave their business and give 
their whole time to the city. But any gentleman 



16 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



present knows we cannot have the work clone by 
committees as it ought to be done, because of the 
pressure upon the time of the Board of Aldermen. 
It was truly said by one of the members last year 
that no Hoard of Aldermen could do the work re- 
quired oi them without giving their whole time 
to it. How many times have we heard it said that 
if they did n't have the best of men in their 
stores, they would have to give up business and 
they hardly dared to go to their stores because 
there were so many people there. When they give 
only a part of their time to the work, it is not as 
well done as it ought to be. They have tne over- 
sight of departments, make up the annual appro- 
priations, and see to the expenditures: and with 
all these things upon them 1 do not believe they 
can do the business as well as they could if they 
gave their whole time to it. It seems to me to be 
a question for us to decide tonight or at some fu- 
ture time, whether these men should uot 
be required to give their whole time to the 
city. It may lie said that the commissions have 
taken a great deal ol work from them. That is 
true; but a vast deal more must be taken from 
them before they can do the work. Hut the ques- 
tion comes to me, Can you Hud twelve men who 
can give their time to it'.' Yon may find a few 
men like one ol the Park Commissioners who can 
give their whole time to their duties. Now, what 
must we do? We must pay them for their 
labors. It is an old and true saying, that 
the workman is worthy ol his hire. It |we ask 
gentlemen to do this work, and if the 
work is not done well because they 
do not give their whole time to if, is n't it time to 
see that they must be paid '.' I'his question must 
come up i" regard to the Hoard ol Aldermen, or 
else we must establish more commissions; and it 
must soon be decided. Perhaps there is a feeling 
in the public that we ought to have more 
commissions, and instead of letting the Al- 
dermen do executive work, that they should 
make laws and ordinances, and that we should 
hire commissioners to carry out these laws. 
It seems to me that i« not the right way 
to do this work. If the Aldermen are to 
be merely a legislative body, they become 
simply an ornament; they merely come here 
to transact a little business, and then their work 
will he done. The better way is to pay Alder- 
men a good salary— get the best men we can 
find, men of talent, and have them devote their 
whole time to it; and in that way save money 
enough to pay for their salaries. The differ- 
ence between the Hoard of Aldermen and 
the commissions is this: The commissions take 
charge of departments and do [not have work 
enough, in making up these commissions we 
give good men a good deal of money to do a little 
work. It has been said the Fire Commission could 
also take the Police Department under their con- 
trol — I have received that almost from them- 
selves—the duties of the two are so much alike. If 
we pay the Aldermen, we can have them as com- 
mittees on the different departments, in- 
stead of having commissioners, and in that 
way we would get a better Government than we 
have today; because those gentlemen, being on 
the different committees, and coining together 
day after day, each would know more about the 
city's work and the duties ol each department; 
and they being constantly brought together would 
give, us what we truly desire, a Hoard of Public 
Works. Those are some of the reasons 
tor otfering the order. I know it will 
meet with some objections. It is said 
that if we pay Aldermen, the office 



will be sought after by broken-down politicians; 
but I have confidence in the citizens of Boston, 
and believe that just as good a Hoard of Aldermen 
will be chosen as now. The power to elect belongs 
to the people, and I believe they can be trusted to 
exercise the ngnt. The Mayor now appoints the 
commissioners; but I would prefer to have this 
go directly to the people to choose who should 
serve them as Aldermen or as commis- 
sioners, rather than have one man nominate 
them, though of course the nominations would have 
to he confirmed by the City Council. A merely 
nominal salarj would be all that is required to 
pay the Common Council, and if we did so we 
would hear less talk about junketing. I hope this 
matter will be fully discussed. 

On motion of Mr. McDonald of Ward 12, the 
order was laid on the table. 

PETITIOH FOB OFFICE. 
By Mr. Kidney ol Ward 6 — Petition of George 
W. Hagar et a/., in favor of William Kies as Assist- 
ant Weigher and Inspector of Ballast. Referred 
to special committee on that subject. Sent up. 

EMPLOYES I.v I'l Hl.ic INSTITUTIONS. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 offered an order- 
That the City Solicitor be requested to give his 
opinion to the City Council in regard to the pow- 
er ol the Board of Directors tor Public Institu- 
tions in regard 1 1 establishing the salaries of offi- 
cers and employes in the institutions under their 
charge. 

Mr. Sampson said the same order was passed 
last, year, but no reply had beeu received. He 
merely renewed if, that, the opinion may come in. 

The order was passed. Sent up. 

CARRIAGE HIKE. 

Mr. Brown of Ward 23 offered an order— That 
the Joint Standing Committee on ordinances be 
requested to consider and report upon the expe- 
diency of providing an ordinance to regulate the 
carriage hire of members of the City Council 
while on official business, and also for the several 
departments thereof. 

Mr. Harry moved to insert "and refreshments." 

In reply "to Mr. McGaragle, Mr. Brown said the 
order fully explained his object. 

Mr. Harry's amendment was rejected, and the 
order was passed. Sent up. 

RULES OF Tilt: COMMON COUNCIL. 

On motion of Mr. Sibley of Waul 5, the report 
on tne rules of the Common Council was taken 
from the table and accepted. 

Later in the session, on motion of Mr. Sibley, the 
vote was reconsidered, and Mr. Sibley oifered 
some verbal amendments, among which was one 
that if a member gave notice of a reconsidera- 
tion and .could not he present at the next meeting, 
some other member could make it for him. 

The amendments were adopted, and the report 
accepted as amended, and the rules and orders 
were declared adopted. 

SOI I-. 

Mr. Brintnall of Ward 5 called tor a report in 
regard to soup for the poor, and Mr. Sampson of 
Ward 17 said last year's Finance Committee had 
made up a report, but he could not get it in. It 
would be among the first matters reported on. 

SALARY COMMITTEE. 

The President appointed Messrs. McGaragle of 
Ward 8 and Cox of Ward 15 on the Salary Com- 
mittee. Sent up. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Barnard of Ward 
24. 



'. ■ . 



.... 



17 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



CITY OF BOS TON. 

Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 21, 1878. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., Alderman 
Stebbins, Chairman, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Weigher of Coal— George H. Pike. Confirmed. 

Undertaker— Harris Levy, for the congregation 
of Shomri Shabos, and to hold office until the 
first Monday of April next. Confirmed. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Paving. Petition for leave 
to move a block of two wooden buildings, by W. 
R. Cavanagh, from corner of E and West Fifth 
streets to Ninth street, rear of H street. 

Elizabeth A. and Thomas dishing, that North- 
ampton street, west of Columbus avenue, be put 
in order. 

Metropolitan Railroad Company, for an addition 
to its location on portions of Boylstou and Claren- 
don streets. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Boston Dental College, for a modifica- 
tion of the order of this Board approved Nov. 3, 
1869. relating to deceased persons. 

To the Committeeon Common on the part of the 
Board. Elizabeth Carter, tor leave to remove 
some trees from Norfolk street, Ward 24. 

To the Commit '.ee on Police. J. P. T. Percival, 
for leave to projecta druggist's mortar in front of 
215 Washington street. 

Allen Shapleigh & Co., for leave to projecta 
business sign in front of store 85 and 8T Court 
street. 

To the Committee on Armories. Captain of 
Company H, Ninth Battalion of Infantry, M. V. 
H.j for a change of location of armory. 

To the Committee on Survey., etc., of Buildings — 
B. F. Sturtevant to eiect a woooen building near 
Union avenue, Ward 23. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions vfce referred in concurrence. 

Order to pay Henrietta B/ooks the amount al- 
lowed by last City Council to her husband, who 
was injured at a fire. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for opinion of City Solicitor on authority 
of Directors for Public Institutions to fix the sala- 
ries of their employes. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for Committee on Printing to consider the 
subject of printing another edition of the ''Army 
and Navy Monument Memorial." Passed In con- 
currence. 

Order for the Committee on Ordinances to con- 
sider the expediency of providing by ordinance 
for the regulation of carriage hire for committees. 
Passed in concurrence. 

Certificate of election of Committee on Finance. 
Placed on file. 

ELECTIONS. 

Reports of nominating committees came up 
and action thereon was taken as follows: 

For Directors of Mast Boston Perries. Alder- 
man McLean and Messrs. Hibbard and Pearl. 
Report accepted, and on motion of Alderman 
Slade a ballot was ordered. Committee— Alder- 
men Slade, Guild. Alderman McLean received 11 
votes, and Councilmen Hibbard and Pearl 11 each, 
and they were declared elected. Certificate sent 
down. 

For Trustees of Ml. Hope Cemetery. Alderman 
Hayden and Messrs. Perbatu ana B. Brintnall. 
Report accepted, and on motion of Alderman 
Perkins a ballot was ordered. Committee— Alder- 
men Perkins, Whiton. Alderman Hayden re- 
ceived 11 votes, Councilmen Perham and B. Brint- 
nall 11 each, and they were declared elected. Cer- 
tificate sent down. 

Por Trustees of Public Library. Alderman 
Guild and Messrs. Shepard and Coe. Report ac- 
cepted in concurrence, and on motion of Alder- 
man Faunce a ballot was ordered. Committee- 
Aldermen Faunce, Hayden. Alderman Guild re- 
ceived 11 votes, and Councilmen Shepard and 
Coe 11 each, and they were declared elected. Cer- 
tificate sent down. 

For Trustees of City Hospital. Alderman Per- 
kins and Messrs. Spenceley and Roberts. Report 
accepted in concurrence. A ballot was ordered. 
Committee— Aldermen Harris, Whidden. Alder- 
man Perkins received 11 votes, and Councilmen 



Spenceley and Roberts 11 each, and they were de- 
clared elected. Certificate sent down. 

For IHrectors for Public Institutions. Alder- 
man Viles, and Messrs. E. H. Sampson and Sibley. 
The report was accepted in concurrence, and a 
ballot ordered on motion of Alderman Robinson. 
Committee — Aldermen Robinson, McLean. Al- 
derman Viles received 10 votes and Councilmen 
E. H. Sampson and Sibley 11 each, and Council- 
man Sawyer 1. The nominees were declared 
elected. Certificate sent down. 

JOINT RULES AND ORDERS. 

The report proposed on joint rules and orders (City 
Doc. 5) came up for concurrence in the order as 
amended by the other branch, providing that DO 
"bill for refreshments which include liquors and 
cigars," shall be approved, etc., as therein set 
forth. 

Alderman Harris— Have the committee made 
rules 20 and 21 [relating to refreshments and car- 
riage hire! as stringent as possible? 

Alderman Viles— I toink the rules are quite lib- 
eral. It rests mostly with the committees what 
they shall have to eat and drink. For my own 
part, I would like to have accepted the rules as we 
had them last year; but we had five upon the com- 
mittee and they all had some rule of their own. 
We had two loiig meetings and a good deal of dis- 
cussion in relation to it. This was the only rule 
upon whrch we could agree. It did not satisfy me 
entirely, I admit; but it is the best we could get. 
The Board can do as they see fit. The committees 
can do as they see fit. If they want cigars or a 
glass of wine, they can have it. The rules are 
very broad and liberal, but I should prefer not to 
see anything about wines and cigars. But we had 
a good many radical members on the committee. 
I hope the rules will pass as they came down from 
the Council. 

Alderman Whidden— I have no particular ob- 
jection to these changes myself ; but it seems to 
u.e to be ratner a small business to attempt to 
legislate prohibitory principles down the throats 
of members of the City Council. We know it is 
futile to attempt to do so. If anybody on a com- 
mittee wants anything to eat or to drink, he will 
be likely to have it; and it looks somewhat f> me 
as if it was a shield behind which somebody 
wanted to take shelter. So far as I am concerned, 
it does not trouble me; but it looks to me as it the 
whole subject ought to be indefinitely postponed, 
more especially sections 20 and 21. I suppose it is 
very difficult tor any one to draw the line between 
the committees. Wines come under the head of 
liquors, and if you are going to prevent any one 
from drinking liquors at the expense of the City, 
you should include wines. But I think it is all 
unnecessary and uncalled for. I have nothing to 
say against the provisions of the other sections; 
but so far as rule 21 is concerned, I think it is un- 
necessary. 

Alderman Slade— It seems to me that the rules 
were well enough as they stood before. For my 
life I cannot see why this committee have found 
it necessary to make any change. As I under- 
stand the rule the chairman of a committee can- 
not invite any person to dinner; lor instance, 
there are times when committees stay here 
very late — eight, nine or teu o'clock— away be- 
yond the usual time when the clerks of the 
committees usually eat; and it has always been 
the practice of committees when they have 
stayed so late to invite the clerks of committees 
to go wiih them to dinner. It appears to me 
that under this rule they cannot do that; still the 
committee, in private explanation, say if a com- 
mittee votes to do that it can be done. Some- 
times the reporters are invited to dine, and I 
don't see how that can be done unless it is by vote 
of the committee. It seems to me that the chair- 
man of a committee ought to be qualified to 
to judge of what is proper and be empowered to 
invite persons to dine under such circumstances. 
I don't like this rule very well, and very much 
prefer the rules as they stood before. I do not 
like to tinker with these things unless we are go- 
ing to make them better, and 1 cannot see that 
this is any improvement at all. I move that we 
substitute the old rule for the amendment. 1 
think that is a great deal better. I have looked 
them over very carefully, and I say that if there 
is no improvement on the old rule, we had better 
let it stand as it is. 

Alderman Viles— While I have no objection to 
the old rule, I rather favor the report of the 
committee, for it was the only cne that we could 
get them to agree upon. The Alderman says it 



JANUARY 21 



1878 



18 



is customary to invite the clerks of committees 
when we keep them late in the afternoon. Well, 
the chairman of a committee says, Shall we take 
the superintendent or the clerk with us? and I 
don't think any committee or member of this 
Board will say no. It all lies with the committee 
and with the chairman. I rather prefer the old 
rules; but if we keep them going back and forth, 
we never shall get them settled. I therefore pre- 
fer to adopt them as they have come down to us. 

Alderman McLean — I hope the motion to ,-ubsti- 
tute will not prevail. It was stated in the com- 
mittee by parties who desired to have this change 
made in rule 20, that they had found that last 
year, on certain occasions, members of a commit- 
tee had run up large bills, and that finally the 
chairman was almost compelled to approve them; 
that parties had taken outsiders and run up quite 
a large bill, and it was proposed to make this rule 
that chairmen might be backed up and say the 
rules prevented them from approving the bills con- 
tracted under such circumstances. It the commit- 
tee say that the charge shall be approveri, of course 
it will be approve 1 !. It leaves the whole thing in 
the bands of the committee, and it seems to me 
that the gentleman opposite should be content 
with that. He may not have — I hope he will not 
— any such experience as they have had 
in years gone by; but should he have 
any such experience, I suppose he would be glad 
to be relieved by being able to say, I am not al- 
lowed to do it; but if the committee approve it I 
will approve it. I believe the rule is intended to 
be a check upon illegitimate junketing. If a com- 
mittee sit late and desire to invite the clerks or 
the superintendent, it is always easy to do so; they 
can take a vote to do it. At any rate, if the chair- 
man is alone and invites the clerk or the superin- 
tendent on his own responsibility, there is n't any 
question but at the next meeting, or at some sub- 
sequent meeting, his action may be approved by 
the committee. It seems to me that this rule had 
better be adopted and prevent the trouble and de- 
lay in getting the consent of the other branch; 
and therefore I hope the motion will not prevail. 

Alderman Slade— It is true that by the reading 
of the rule a bill can be approved if they 
should have their dinner, after spending more or 
less time, or enough to entitle them to a dinner; 
but the bill cannot be approved unless the whole 
committee vote to do so at a subsequent meeting. 
The chairman cannot approve it; and supposing 
the committee should vote not to approve it? 
There are a good many supposable cases, as this 
stands. Some committees have five members, 
some eight and some more, and frequently there 
are sub-committees at work on days when the 
full committee do not meet; there may be four 
against and four for apuroving a bill; some com- 
mittees will approve bills and some will not. It 
seems to leave the thing so badly mixed up that I 
do not exactly like it. It is supposed that every- 
body will do just what is right, and I hope they 
will. As a general thing committees do. There 
may be times, and there may have been times 
last year, when the privilege that we take was 
abused; andlhavedo doubt it is abused, and it 
is liable to be abused here. But every committee 
has a member of the Board of Alderman for 
chairman, and every member of this Board who 
looks over the bills and finds some charges that 
are outrageous would not approve them. I should 
not, and I don't think any other member of this 
Board would. I should give committees to under- 
stand that all reasonable bills will be approved; 
but I think this is just as liable to abuse as the old 
rule. I cannot see why it is not. 

Alderman McLean— I think the gentleman's ob- 
jections are hardly vital. I think it is hardly a 
supposable case; for if his committee had a sub- 
committee at work for the city during the interim 
between the regular meetings of the committee, I 
think it hardly a supposable case that there would 
be any question but that the bills would be ap- 
proved. It appears to me that any reasonable 
body of men would approve any reasonable bills 
for such services. I think we hardly have the 
right to suppose that they Would not so so. I 
don't think the objection will hold good. 

Alderman Viles— I think the sub-committee 
would certainly hold the right bower, and I have 
no doubt but that they and the chairman would 
vote to pay the bill. 

Alderman Slade's motion to amend was lost, 
and the Board concurred in the adoption of the 
rules as they came from the other branch. 

The Chairman announced that under the rules 
just passed the Committee on Salaries had been 



increased t rom five to eight members, and that a 
certificate had come up of the appointment of 
Messrs. Mc'Garagle and Cox on said committee. 
The Chairman appointed Alderman Harris on said 
committee on the part of the Jtsoard. 

REPORTS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Chief of Police. The reports of the Chief of Po- 
lice tor the quarter and for the year ending Dec. 
31, 1877, were received. The former was placed on 
file and the latter was sent down. 

Constable's Bond. The bond of J. Stuart Mac- 
Corry, Constable, being presented duly certified, 
was approved by the Board. 

Commissioner on Cambridge Bridges. Annual 
Report. The draw of West Boston Bridge has 
been opened 158G times; that of Canal Bridge, 2742 
times; and that of Prison Point Bridge, 394 times. 
The total expense to Boston has been $6311.13. 
Sent down. 

Street Commissioners. Annual Report — The 
widening of Tremont and Parker streets, and the 
opening of Faxon street to Smith street at Rox- 
bury, $8576.50; the laying out of Shelby street at 
East Boston, $7035.34; widening of River street 
from Washington street to Blue Hill avenue, 
$4500; the laying- out and extension of Parker 
Hill avenue over Parker Hill to Parker street, 
$4170.41; widening of Mill street, $3000: of Adams 
street, Dorchester, $2114.75; of Ruggles street, 
near the Providence Railroad, $1656; of Dorches- 
ter avenue at Pond street, $1000; the laying 
out of Ward street at Roxbury, $900; the open 
ing of Wyman street to Lamartine street, $850; 
widening of Harrison avenue near Harvard street, 
$744; of Tremont street near Faxon street, $605; 
of Blue Hill avenue at corner Schuyler street, 
$582; of Parkman street corner of Dorchester 
avenue, $340; of Warren street near Walnut 
avenue, $222; of Portland street near Chardon 
street, $181.25; of Rockland street at Roxbury, 
£162.40; the laying out and opening of Temple 
street at West Roxbury to Mount Vernon street, 
$100; and the extension of Dix street to Dorches- 
ter avenue, $75. 

The total estimated expense of their operations 
during the year the Commissioners find to be 
$36,814.65. They have likewise effected the laying 
out of Parker street — from the northerly line of 
Boylston street extended to that part of the 
street in Roxbury which was already a public 
way— at no estimated expense. 

A widening of Liberty square, to improve the 
lines of a large estate upon which the owner con- 
templates building, took 386 square feet, an equal 
amount at another point on the line being discon- 
tinued in exchange for it. 

The discontinuances from streets made by the 
commissioners during the year were 69 square feet 
from High street at Charlestown; 190 from Beach 
street, opposite Newton place; portions from 
River street, to straighten the lines when the 
above-mentioned widening was made; 26 square 
feet from the junction of Cambridge and Sever 
streets in Charlestown, for a small amount taken 
in exchange to widen; 386 square feet from Lib- 
erty square, and 196 square feet from Rockland 
street at Roxbury. 

Private streets released to the city and accepted 
during the year were in the City Proper, Here- 
ford (Marlborough to Commonwealth avenue), 
Decatur street, St. James avenue (Dartmouth to 
Exeter), Stevens street, Pemberton square, River 
(Beacon to Chestnut), Fay street, and Dartmouth 
and Lincoln places; in South Boston, Brewster 
street; in Roxbury, King, Alleghany (formerly 
Parker place), Maple, CunardT Crawford and 
Downer streets, Woodville square, Woodward 
avenue, Avon place, Codman park and West Wal- 
nut park ; in Dorchester, Dix, Sagamore, Bailey, 
Fuller and Greenwich streets, and Sawyer and 
Everettavenues; in West Roxbury. Bishop. Burr. 
Dale, Holbrook and Rutledsre streets and Luion 
avenue; in Brighton. Sparhawk street, and in 
Charlestown, Frothingham avenue and Bates and 
Ferriu streets. 

The Street Commissioners wish to inform the 
honorable Council that they are constantly under 
pressure to lay out as public ways a large number 
of private streets in different "parts of the city, 
which, while they may not be in all cases thor- 
oughfares, are necessary for bnilidng purposes, 
and often very convenient for the residents of the 
immediate neighborhood where they are located. 
The petitioners complain that they do not receive 
their share of the benefits for which they are 
taxed in this direction, being deprive:! not only 
of proper access to their estates, but of the use of 



19 



BOARD OF AJl-DEPtMEN 



the Coehituate water and of sewerage; as tbe de- 
partments having: charge of these matters refuse 
to introduce water or sewers upon streets before 
they are put at tne grade necessary for their ac- 
ceptance as public ways. 

These streets are often occupied by people of 
limited means, and are frequently in an unhealthy 
as well as in an unsightly and dangerous 
condition. Their acceptance works such a 
change in them for the better, rendering 
them safe, comfortable andclean, where they 
were almost utterly uninhabitable before, 
that other streets are immediately presented 
to the commissioners for like treatment ; 
and the Hoard of Health has otten been 
forward in urging the improvement of such ways 
where it has been so plainly for the sanitary 
interests of the city. 

From that point of view, the commissioners 
believe this the fittest and most economical ex- 
penditure that can be made of a part of the mon- 
ey that is appropriated for the construction and 
maintenance of the city streets; that at least a 
hundred thousand dollars should be specially set 
apart tor putting in order such streets as the com- 
missioners may deem the public convenience and 
necessity require to be laid out. The commis- 
sioners think that the care of such streets as they 
have indicated has at least equal claim upon the 
city with the improved sewerage, parks.orthe cost- 
ly repairing of thoroughfares already incompara- 
bly superior to like streets in any city in the coun- 
try, that these private streets and courts, that 
are a disgrace to any city, maybe made in some 
degree worthy of this one. Respectfully submit- 
ted, for the Hoard of Btreet Commissioners, 

Newton Talbot, Chairman. 

Sent down. 

Harbor Master. Annual Report— After refer- 
ring in a general way to the changes in the carry- 
ing trade of Boston, and the large increase of 
steamers which require his attention, Mr. Gates 
speaks as follows of "Further Harbor Lines"; 

West Side — During my first year (187G) as Har- 
bor Master I found a necessity existed for a fur- 
ther change of "ranges" for anchorage lor small 
vessels, caused by tbe extension of the sea wall on 
the line of the channel, known as "Fort Point," 
nearly to Foster's wharf. 

This promiscuous anchoring caused serious 
troubles and deiav to the line steamers arriving 
and departing from New York, Philadelphia and 
Baltimore. Their movements were much ham- 
pered. My suggestions to the Harbor Committee 
were duly "considered, and authority was given me 
to carry out my suggestions. 

The cnange I effected relieved the difficulty and 
gave greater room for the movements of these 
steamers, which as a class are large and heavy. 

East Side— i was under the necessity (under au- 
thority from the Harbor Committee) of making a 
change in the anchoring ground at and near the 
various docks at East Boston, including those 
owned and operated by the Boston & Albany 
Railroad, so that the movements of large ships 
coming there to load grain at the "elevators," as 
well as other meicbandise, should be unobstruct- 
ed. I had seen the necessity for a change, and 
strongly urged it to the committee. 

Added to this change, which involved much 
labor, there were several dredges employed in the 
excavation of a "shoal" off Cunard and Boston 
& Albany docks. This work was being done un- 
der the supervision of the Harbor Commissioners. 
I was compelled to change the position of these 
dredges seven (7) times, so as to allow the several 
steamers and large ships to approach and depart 
from the several docks. I removed them three (3) 
times in addition, to allow the steamer of the 
Leland line to get in and out of dock. 

In conclusion I will say that the regulations 
controlling Boston Harbor are, I think, sufficient 
at present for the rapid and convenient move- 
ments of our steam and sailing tonnage, and I 
find no difficulty in enforcing them ; but constant 
vigilance is necessary, to see that no one interest 
shall intrude upon "another, when they are so 
diversified. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Guild submitted reports from the 
Committee on Licenses as follows : 

Wagon Licenses Granted — Daniel Hurley, Swan 
street; P. M. Cousens, 17 Camden street; Dike & 
Burchard, 192 Hampden street; E. Sheehan, India 
Market ; S. L. Hill, Dorchester avenue, near Pre- 
ble street; William H. Martin, corner Parker and 
Centre streets; Wiuslow & Co., two express wag- 
ons. 



Auctioneers Licensed— James J. Dennis, 20 Court 
street (renewal); D. A. Hal), 231 Washington 
street (renewal); Barry & Locke, 54 Dorchester 
avenue; Gilbert Wait, 390 Broadway. 

Victuallers Licensed— Edward ft. Hutchinson, 
4 Central square, East Boston ; Willis M. Wheeler, 
491 Harris-oil avenue. 

Amusement Licenses Granted— J. W. Cadwell, to 
give exhibitions of mesmerism at Amory Hall for 
six weeks, except Sundays; A. P. Peck," to give a 
cat show. 

Intelligence Office Licensed— Christiana E. Bell, 
89 Court street. 

Skating Rink Lice sed— J. S. Dow, on Liberty 
square, on consideration that no intoxicating 
liquors are sold on the premises, and that the 
wooden buildings are approved by the Inspector 
of Buildings. 

Severally accepted. 

Ordered", That all licenses granted to minors for 
the pursujt of any vocation, or for the sale of any 
fruits or provisions whatever, live animals, 
brooms, agricultural implements, fuel, news- 
papers, books or pamphlets, agricultural products 
of the United States, the products of his own 
labor, or any labor of his own family, for which 
licenses are by law required to be granted by this 
Board, shall be granted upon the following terms 
and conditions, which shall be inserted in the cer- 
tificate, with such other conditions and regula- 
tions as this Board may deem expedient, viz. : 

1. No minor shall be licensed as a hawker or 
pedler, or as a bootblack, in this city, except upon 
application of his parent, guardian or next friend. 

2. Every minor so licensed shall attend some 
school, .approved by the School Committee, each 
day during the school year. 

3. All licenses shall specify the articles to be sold, 
or the business to be pursued, and the licenses 
issued to bootblacks shall contain the places as- 
signed therefor. 

4. Each minor licensed by the Board of Alder- 
men shall, at all times while engaged in the busi- 
ness for which he is licensed, wear, conspicuous- 
ly in sight, a badge, with the word "Licensed" 
and;the number of his license thereon; a neglect 
so to do shall be a sufficient cause for a revocation 
of said license. 

5. No minor so licensed shall sell any articles, 
or pursue any business for which he may be li- 
censed, at any other place than that mentioned in 
his license. 

6. Minors so licensed shall not congregate to- 
gether, make any unnecessary noise, or in any 
other way disturb or annoy persons as they pass. 

7. All licenses shall be granted for a definite 
period, and all licenses which are not for a short- 
er period shall terminate on the first Monday in 
January, in each successive year, and all licenses 
which are not expressed for a shorter period shall 
extend to the close of the municipal year. 

8. Each minor so licensed shall exhibit his 
license to any officer of the city for inspection, 
when required so to do, and the same shall not be 
transferred, exchanged, borrowed or lenr, nor 
shall he employ, or furnish with papers to sell, 
any unlicensed minor, on pain of forfeiture of 
said license. 

9. Stands for the purpose of blacking boots 
and shoes may be located in such places as shall 
not interfere with the convenience or the public, 
and they shall be under the immediate supervi- 
sion of the truant officer in whose district such 
stands may be located, and the said officer shall 
be responsible for the good order and discipline 
of the occupants. 

10. Truaut officers may designate and establish 
such number of stands for bootblacks within 
their several districts as, in their judgment, the 

fiublic good may require, and no more than one 
iceosea minor shall occupy any such stand; and 
any such minor who allows idle persons to assem- 
ble around him at such stand shall have his per- 
mit annulled. 

11. The violation of tbe laws of the State, the 
ordinances of the city, or the terms and condi- 
tions herein prescribed, shall operate as a for- 
feiture of this license. 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Whidden submitted the following 
from the Committee on Paving: 

Report ot leave to withdraw on petition of Ed- 
win R. Frost to erect a post in sidewalk 109-113 
Devonshire street. Accepted. 

Reports that leave be granted to move wooden 
buildings by M. Ellis & Co., from 331 Princeton 
street to 338 Bennington street; John Devine, 



JAN U ARY 



21 



1878 



20 



from Keyes street to rear of same street, Ward 23. 
Severally accepted. 

Report and order for hearing on Monday, Feb. 
11, at four o'clock P. M. on petition of Cambridge 
Railroad Company to ran cars to Summer street. 
Order Dassed. 

Orders to authorize the Superintendent of 
Streets to lay crosswalks and pave gutters on the 
public streets of the city when deemed expedi- 
ent by the Committee on Paving ; to erect fences in 
front" of vacant lots on public streets when the 
public safety requires the same ; to furnish and 
set edgestones and pave sidewalks on any portion 
of public streets when the abutters agree in writ- 
ing to pay one half the cost thereof; to number or 
renumber any street, court or place within the 
city limits, whenever the public, convenience will 
be promoted thereby; to grant permits to 
open the streets, in accordance with the 
eleventh and twelfth sections of the Re- 
vised Ordinances ot 1876 relating to streets, 
to contract, from time to time, for the 
purchase, sale and exchange of horses, the supply 
of hay, grain, paving stones, gravel and other 
materials required for the operations of the Pav- 
ing Department during the present muncipal 
year. Severally read twice and passed. 

Schedule of cost of certain edgestones and 
order for collection of the same. Orders read 
twice and passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
and he is hereby empowered and directed to 
remove without delay any and all structures or 
things which may hereafter be built into or upon 
the sidewalks of public ways in this city, so as to 
hinder, incommode or endanger persons travel- 
ling thereon, or which obstruct or encumber the 
way. 

Alderman McLean asked for an explanation of 
this order. 

Alderman Whidden — It has reference to any ob- 
struction that may be erected by any individual 
in or upon any sidewalk. It is more especially 
for the prevention of encroachments over the 
street lines in building operations. The principal 
object of the order is that in case any obstructions 
are placed over the sidewalk or the street lines, 
the Superintendent of Streets will have power to 
remove them. It is virtually an order for the en- 
forcement of the present ordinance. 

Alderman McLean — I would inquire if this has 
reference to apple and other fruit stands on the 
sidewalks? 

Alderman Whidden— No, sir, it has nothing to 
do with them. 

Alderman McLean — Then I have nothing to say; 
but I did hope it would have something in refer- 
ence to them, and when that case comes up I shall 
have something to say about them. 

The order was read twice and passed. 

CITY SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Faunce offered an order — That the 
City Surveyor be authorized, with the approval 
of the Joint Standing Committee on the Survey- 
or's Department, to make such purchases of sup- 
plies, instruments, drawing materials, and to in- 
cur such other expenses as may be necessary for 
that department during the present municipal 
year. Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

Alderman Faunce, from the Joint Committee 
on Public Lands, submitted a report and order — 
That the Collector be and he hereby is authorized 
to cancel the bond numbering fifty-eight in the 
Suffolk-street district, the amount of which is 
$4745.45, and given by William Corbett for an es- 
tate on Chapman street, upon his surrendering 
the agreement to convey the same, and that the 
Superintendent of Public Lands {be direct- 
ed to issue a new agreement with all the 
conditions as set forth in the previous one, 
upon the said William Corbett giving to the city a 
bond in the sum of $4745.45, made payable in eight 
instalments, the first instalment of $594.45 to be 
paid upon the signing of said bond, and the seven 
annual instalments of $593 each upon the 29th 
day of January in each year, until the full 
amount is paid, with interest at six per cent,; 
said bond and agreement to be dated Jan. 29, 
1878. Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Viles, from the Committee on Police, 
submitted orders— That the Committee on Police 
be authorized to make such repairs as may be 
necessary for the care and preservation of the 
several police stations and the police steamboat; 



to make such arrangements as they may deem ex- 
pedient for keeping the horses used in the Police 
Department; to purchase from time to time such 
furniture and supplies as may be required for the 
use of the Police Department: the expenses sev- 
erally to be charged to the appropriation for 
Police. Severally read twice and passed. 

STABLES. 

Alderman Viles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Health on the part of the Board 
that leave be granted on the usual conditions to 
occupy stables, by R. A. Upton, Zeigler street; 
William Donnahue, Dickens street; F. G. Cass, 
rear North Harvard street; Ellen M. Murphy, 
Hyde street. Severally accepted. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Slade submitted the following from 
the Joint Committee on Public Buildings: 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings, under the direction of the Committee 
on Public Buildings, be authorized to supply the 
necessary furniture, and cause to be made such 
repairs and cleaning as may be necessary in the 
several high, grammar and primary schoolhouses; 
the expense therefor to be charged to the appro- 
priation for Schoolhouses, Public Buildings. Read 
twice and passed. Sent down. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings, under the direction of the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Public Buildings, be authorized 
to supplj the necessary furniture for, and cause 
such repairs to be made, and cleaning, as may be 
needed upon the City Hali ; also such repairs upon 
the police stations and engine houses, together 
with other public buildings as are not made by 
the respective departments using the same, the 
expense to be charged to the appropriation for 
Public Buildings. Read twice and passed. Sent 
down. 

COUNTY BUILDINGS. 

Alderman Slade, from the Committee on County 
Buildings, offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Build- 
ings be and they are hereby authorized to cause 
such repairs and alterations to be made as may be 
needed on the Court House, County Jail and Pro- 
bate buildings; also, on the Municipal Court 
rooms in the Highlands, Dorchester, West Rox- 
bury, Brighton, Charlestown, East and South 
Boston, provided such repairs and alterations 
shall not exceed the sum of five thousand dollars 
on any one building during the municipal year; 
the expense therefor to be charged to the appro- 
priation for the County of Suffolk. Read twice 
and passed 

Ordered, That the Committee on CountyBuildings 
be and they are hereby authorized to provide the 
necessary furniture for the Court House and Pro- 
bate'Building; also foijthejMunicipa) Court rooms, 
Highlands, Dorchester, West Roxbury, Brighton, 
Charlestown, East and South Boston, the expense 
therefor to be charged to the appropriation for 
the County of Suffolk. Read twice and passed. 

CITY ENGINEER'S DEPART3IENT. 

Alderman Robinson, from the Committee on 
Engineer's Department, offered an order— That 
the City Engineer be authorized, with the approv- 
al of the Joint Standing Committee on Engineer's 
Department, to make such purchases of supplies, 
instruments and drawing materials, and to incur 
such other expenses as may be necessary for that 
department during the present municipal year. 

REQUEST FOR AN ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATION 
FOR SEWERS. 

Aldermau Viles submitted the following (Cltv 
Doc. 13): 

The Committee on Sewers request an additional 
appropriation of nine thousand dollars for that 
department to defray the ordinary expenses until 
May 1, The deficiency in the appropriation has 
been caused by the transfer to this department 
from the Paving Department of the construction 
of all the catch-basins for street water and their 
connections. This expenditure was not counted 
upon in fixing the appropriation, and has amount- 
ed to $43,000.' The details which govern the com- 
mittee in asking for the above amount are as fol- 
lows : 

Already expended #147 .666.94 

Draft for 1st February 3.800.60 

Ordinary office and labor pay roils for 

March and April 4.500.00 

Other expenses 3,000.00 

#158,966.94 
Appropriation 150.000.00 



21 



BOARD OF ALDERMEJN 



Excess 88,966.94 



For the committee. 

Clinton Viles, Chairman. 

Alderman Viles— However much I dislike to 
come to this Board this early in the season to 
ask for an additional appropriation for a commit- 
tee of which I am chairman, I think this request 
explains itself and should be granted. In making 
np the appropriation for the Sewer Department 
at the first ot the year it is almost impossible to 
say what money will be required, not knowing 
what petitions for sewers will come in— and 
we virtually have to guess at it. When the 
estimates were made the committee had 
built about five miles of sewers, besides 
repairing a great many drains. When our 
estimates were made up at the last February, 
we wete not aware that we should have the catch 
basins to build, they having heretofore been built 
by the Paving Committee. But after several 
meetings and much discussion it was transferred 
to the Sewer Committee, and we have built them 
at an expense this year of forty-six thousand dol- 
lars, and that is the reason we are compelled to 
ask for an additional appropriation. The season 
has been an unusually open one, and the men 
have worked a month later than they have for 
years. 

On motion of Alderman Viles, the request was 
referred to the Finance Committee. Sent down. 
IMPROVED SEWERAGE. 

Alderman Whidden offered an order— That the 
leave of absence to the City Engineer for the pur- 
pose of examining the systems of sewerage in 
Eurooe, by an order of the City Council, passed 
Oct. 9, 1877, be and the same is hereby extended 
one mouth. Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

LAND DAMAGES. 

Alderman Perkins, from the Committee on 
Streets on the part of the Board, offered orders 
to pay for land and street damages— Isaac Fenno, 
$118, widening Warren street; James G. Haynes, 



$533.75, widening of Adams street. Severally read 
twice and passed. 

EXTENSION OF WEST CHESTER PARK. 

Alderman Perkins ottered an order— That the 
Board of Street Commissioners report to this 
Board upon the expediency and approximate ex- 
pense of changing the line of West Chester park 
at the bend west of and near Huntington avenue, 
by substituting a suitable curve in place of the 
existing angle. Passed. 

MYSTIC VALLEY' RAILROAD. 

Aluermau Harris ottered an order — That the 
City Solicitor, under the direction of the Commit- 
tee on the Harbor on the part of this Board, be re- 
quested to appear before the Harbor Commission- 
ers on the 24th inst., and request a postponemont 
ol the proposed bearing on the subject of the 
Mystic Valley Railroad Bridge across Charles 
River, until this Board has passed upon the peti- 
tion of said Mystic Valley Railroad Company, for 
the approval of the route and terminus of said 
railroad within this city. Read twice and passed. 

KKYISINc; THE NAMES OF STREETS. 

Aldermen Viles offered an order— That the Com- 
mittee on Paving be requested to cousider the 
expediency of revising the names of streets so as 
to prevent the designation of more than one street 
by the same name. Passed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS RE81 MED. 
Alderman Guild offered an order— That the sev- 
eral standing committees of this Board resume 
the unfinished business of the last year which is 
appropriate to said committees. Read twice and 
passed. 

ROXIH'KV CANAL. 

A petition was received from David W. Cheever, 
M. D., et al., for immediate action in the matter 
of the Roxbury Canal nuisance. Laid on the 
table until the opinion of the City Solicitor is re- 
ceived. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman McLean. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 24, 1878. 



Regular meeting at 7V 2 o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Pope, President, iu the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOABD OF ALDERMEN, 

Annual reports of Harbor Master, Chief of Po- 
lice, Commissioner on Cambridge Bridges and 
Street Commissioners. Severally placed on tile. 

Reference to Committee on Finance of a request 
for an additional appropriation of $9000 for Sewer 
Department. Concurred. 

Orders for furniture to be supplied to the sev- 
eral schoolhouses and the City Hall, and for re- 
pairs and cleaning to be made on said buildings, 
the police stations, engine houses and certain 
other public buildings during the present year. 
Ordered to a second reading. 

Order for City Engineer to make purchases of 
supplies, instruments and drawing materials, and 
incur other necessary expenses during present 
year, for his department ; and order for City Sur- 
veyor to do the same for his department. Sev- 
erally ordered to a second reading. 

Order to cancel the bond of William Corbett for 
an estate on Chapman street, and to issue a new 
agreement therefor, as therein set forth. Read 
twice and passed in concurrence. 

Order to extend leave of absence to City Engi- 
neer one month for examination of systems of 
sewerage in Europe. Read twice and passed in 
concurrence. 

ELECTIONS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Certificates came down of the elections of city 
officers as follows : 

For Trustees of Public Library— Alderman 
Guild, and Messrs. Shepard and Coe. 

For Trustees of City Hospital— Alderman Per- 
kins, and Messrs. Spenceley and Roberts. 

For Directors foi Public Institutions — Alderman 
Viles, and Messrs. E. H. Sampson and Sibley. 

For Directors of East Boston Ferries— Alderman 
McLean, and Messrs. Hibbard and Pearl. 

For Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetery— Alderman 
Hayden, and Messrs. Perham and B. Brintuall. 

The certificates were severally placed on file, 
ana elections were ordered in each case, with the 
following results : 

Trustees of Public Library. Committee— Messrs. 
Barnard of Ward 24, Burke,of Ward 2, and McDon- 
ald of Ward 12. 

Whole number of votes 64 

Necessary for a choice 33 

Alderman Curtis Guild had 64 

Councilman H. N. Shepard 60 

" H. F. Coe 64 

" Charles S. Perham 3 

" RogerWolcott 1 

And Messrs. Guild, Shepard and Coe were elected 
in concurrence. 

Trustees of Kt. Hope Cemetery. Committee — 
Messrs. Webster of Ward 3, Ward of Ward 21 and 
Nason of Ward 17. 

Whole number of votes 61 

Necessary for a choice 31 

Alderman Charles Hayden had 61 

Councilman Charles S. Perham 60 

" B. Brintuall 52 

" Robert Cox 1 

D. A.Flynn 1 

And Messrs. Hayden, Perham and B. Brintnall 
were elected in concurrence. 

Directors of East Boston Ferries. Committee- 
Messrs. McGaragle of Ward 8, Roberts of Ward 4, 
and Santry of Ward 19. 

Whole number of votes 67 

Necessary for a choice 84 

Alderman Charles R. McLean had 65 

Councilman S. P. Hibbard 63 

" Edward Pearl — 65 

J.J.Doherty 1 

Blank 1 

And Messrs. McLean, Hibbard and Pearl were 
elected in concurrence. 

Trustees of the City Hospital. Committee — 
Messrs. Thompson of Ward 9, Perham of Ward 23, 
and Sampson of Wa/d 18. 

Whole number of votes 68 

N ecessar y for a choice 35 

Alderman Samuel C. Perkins 67 



Councilman C. J. Spenceley 63 

Peter S. Roberts 64 

" O.H.Sampson 3 

J. H.Danforth 1 

And Messrs. Perkins, Spenceley and Roberts were 
declared elected in concurrence. 

Directors for Public Institutions. Committee — 
Messrs. Pearl of Ward 1, Hill of Ward 14, and Day 
of Ward 5. 

Whole nurrber of votes 70 

Necessary for a choice 36 

Alderman Viles had 68 

Councilman E. H. Sampson 61 

" E. Sibley 66 

" N.J. Rust 4 

I. Rosnosky 1 

R.M.Thompson 1 

" J. B. Richardson 1 

" RogerWolcott l 

And Messrs. Viles, E. H.Sampson and Sibley were 
declared elected in concurrence. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order for Superintendent of Health to contract 
for horses and exchanges, hay, grain, vehicles, 
and materials for his department during the pres- 
ent year. Passed. Sent up. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 presented the annual re- 
port of the Superintendent of Public Lands. (City 
Doc. 11.) 

During the year 1877 no sales of lands were 
made by the committee, and it is the first time 
since the Superintendent came into office, in 1854, 
but what, in his annual report, some sales have 
been alluded to as taking place during each year. 
A number of applications for the purchase of 
laud were received and prices fixed for the sale 
thereof ; but, being unsatisfactory, and the offer 
as afterwards made by the applicants being below 
the assessed value, it was not deemed advisable 
by the committee to accept the same, and they re- 
spectfully declined to sell. 

Forty thousand and eighty-one feet of land have 
been taken possession or during the year by or- 
ders of the City Council, and $4807.67 have been 
received and paid to Collector. The expenditures 
of the department proper have been $3241.83, and 
$234.98 on Suffolk-street district. The amount of 
salable lands in charge of the department is as 
follows : 

In city proper 390,286 sq. f f 

10,492 " 

" South Boston 578,434 " 

" Highlands 750,130 " 

'* Dorchester 1,761,253 " 

" Charlestown 49,540 " 

" WestRoxbury 48,816 " 

" Northampton-street District 183,708 " 

And two tracts in Brighton. 
Sent up. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

A communication was received from the Board 
of Health, for the transfer of $300 from the special 
appropriation for building a fever hospital on 
Gallop's Island to the general appropriation. This 
is asked for the purpose of making additions and 
repairs on the remaining buildings on the island. 
Referred to Committee on Finance. Sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Santry of Ward 19— Petition of William 
Clark for the extension of Weston street in Ward 
19. Referred to the Street Commissioners. Sent 
up. 

By Mr. Mullen of Ward 13— Petition of Boston 
pilots in favor of reelection of F. C. Cates as Har- 
bor Master. Referred to joint special committee 
on that subject. Sent up. 

By Mr. Richardson o: Ward 10— Petitious of 
Ann Morris, to be compensated for personal in- 
juries received by falling on fan icy sidewalk on 
Cambridge street, Charlestown, on Dec. 28. 1876; 
and Charles F. Sbimmin et aL, to be refunded a 
half part of a tax paid as trustee of the will of 
Peter Parker, with interest. Severally referred 
to the Joint Committee on Claims. Sent down. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 submitted a repo r t from 
the Committee on Ordinances on the order re- 
ferred to them among the unfinished business of 
last year to report an ordinance to provide for the 
appointment of a Superintendent of Printing, 
recommending the passage of the following: 
An Ordinance to Amend an Ordinance in Relation 
to Printing. 

Be it ordained, etc. 

Section 1. The ordinance relating to printing 
is hereby amended by striking out the third and 



38 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



fourth sections and inserting the following in 
place thereof: 

•Sect. 3. The Mayor shall forthwith appoint, 
subject to the approval of the City Council by 
vote taken by ballot in each branch thereof, by 
yea and nay, a Superintendent of Printing, to hold 
office until the first day of July, 1881, and until his 
successor is duly chosen and qualified; and on 
every third year after the present the Mayor shall 
with like approval appoint a Superintendent of 
Printing tor a term of three years from the rirst 
day ot , Inly in the year of such appointment, and 
until his successor is chosen and qualified. A va- 
cancy in said office shall be tilled tor the unexpir- 
ed term in the same manner as the original ap- 
pointment is required to be made, but in case of a 
vacancy, or of disability of the Superintendent to 
perform the duties ot his office, cue Mayor may, 
with the approval of the Joint Standing Commit- 
tee on Printing, appoint a Superintendent pro tem- 
pore. The Mayor ina<- also, subject to the ap- 
proval of the City Council, declared in the manner 
above set forth, remove any Superintendent of 
Printing. 

"Sect. 4. The Superintendent of Printing shall 
be a person who is a practical printer, and well 
versed in the various branches of the arts of 
printing and book binding. He shall not be in- 
terested directly or indirectlv in any print- 
ing, binding, stock or stationery for the City 
Government or for any department thereof. He 
shall give bond in the penal sum ot five thousand 
dollars for the faithful performance of the duties 
of his office. He shall receive such compensation 
as the City Council may from time to time deter- 
mine, and he shall annually submit to the City 
Council a report of the amount of printing, bind- 
ing, stock and stationery done for or supplied to 
each department of the City Government, and the 
cost thereof, and generally of all matters trans- 
acted under his superintendence." 

Ordered to a second reading. 

JOIST RULES AM) 0KDBB8. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 submitted reports from 
the Joint Special Committee on Rules and Orders 
of the City Council, as follows: 

Proceedings of Committees. Report on the 
order to keep proceedings of committees from the 
public until committees have reported to the City 
Council— That, in their opinion the regulation of 
such matters should be left to the discretion of 
the several committees, and therefore it is inexpe- 
dient to adopt the order. Accepted. Sent up. 

Regulation of Carriage Hire. Report that they 
deem it expedient that the hiring of carriages at the 
city's expense should be regulated and a record of 
the same kept, and recommending the passage of 
an order— That the Joint Rules and Orders of the 
City Council be amended by inserting after sec- 
tion 20 the following: 

"Section 21. All carriages furnished to members 
of the City Government sball,whenevcr practicable, 
be ordered through the City Messenger, and when 
not so ordered the person who orders them shall 
forthwith give notice thereof to the City Messen- 
ger, and in all cases the party who furnishes a 
carriage shall, within seven days thereafter, re- 
turn to the City Messenger, a detailed statement 
of the names of the persons who used the same, 
and of the time during which and the purposes 
for which it was used." 

The order was read twice and passed, by a rising 
vote— (in for, against. Sent up. 

estates sold for taxes, etc. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 11 submitted the follow- 
ing: 

The Joint Standing Committee on Treasury De- 
partment beg leave to submit herewith a schedule, 
furnished by the City Collector, of estates which 
have been purchased from time to time by the 
city at sales made on account of non-payment of 
taxes and other assessments. The city be- 
came the purchaser of these estates under 
the law which provides that if. within 
ten days after the sale of real estate for the pay- 
ment of taxes, any purchaser thereof shall fail to 
pay to the collector the sum offered by him and 
receive his deed, the sale shall be deemed to be 
null and void, and the citv shall be deemed to be 
the purchaser of the estate (1862, chap. 183). In 
other cases the city became the purchaser, undei 
a provision of the same statute which requires 
that if no person shall appear and bid for an 
estate offered for sale, the sale shall be postponed 
from day to day for a term not exceeding 
seven days, and then, if there is no bid 



for the estate, the collector shall pur- 
chase the estate in behalf of the city. Your com- 
mittee are of the opinion that the city should 
formally take possession of this property in order 
that it. may have the benefit of any income which 
may be derived from it, and also that the estates 
may be sold in any cases where it may be deemed 
for the interest of the city. They would therefore 
respectfully recommend* the passage of the ac- 
companying order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Lands 
be authorized to tak, possession of the estates 
named in the accompanying schedule, said estates 
having been sold for unpaid assessments, and of 
which the city has become the purchaser, and 
said committee is hereby invested with the same 
powers in relation thereto that they now have in 
other matters. 

Read twice and passed. Sent up. 
"finance committee. 

Mr. Pierce of Ward 24 announced that the Fi- 
nance Committee on the part of the Common 
Council had met today and organized by the 
choice of Eugene H. Sampson of Ward 17 as chair- 
man and Alfred T. Turner as clerk. 

DISPOSITION OF TOI'Its IN THE HAYOB'S ADBBESS. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 submitted a report from 
the joint special committee to report what dispo- 
sition should be made of the several topics in the 
Mayor's inaugural address, recommending the 
passage of the following: 

Ordered, That so much ol the Mayor's address 
as relates to the registration of voters and modes 
of conducting elections be i eterred to the Joint 
Standing Committee on Legislative Matters. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to refreshments and carriage hire be referred to 
the Joint Special Committee on Rules and Orders 
of the City Council. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to the assessment ot taxes be referred to the Joint 
Standing Committee on Assessors' Department. 

That so much of the Mayor's address 
as relates to placing the administration 
of police and the issuing ot licenses 
in charge, of a Board of Commissioners be. re- 
ferred to the Joint Standing Committee on Or- 
dinances. 

That so much of the Mayor's addiess as re- 
lates to the improvement of the Back Bay Park 
and Charles River Embankment be referred to 
the Joint Special Committee on Public, Parks. 

That so much of the Mayor's address as relates 
to placing the public pleasure grounds under the 
Board of Park Commissioners be referred to the 
Joint Standing Committee on Common and Pub- 
lic Grounds. 

That so much ot the Mayor's address as relates 
to the Public Library be referred to the .Joint 
Standing Committee on Public Library. 

Ordered, That so much of the Major's address 
as relates to the Lunatic Hospital be relerred to 
his Honor the Mayor, with a request that be will 
confer with the State authorities and the Board. 
ot Directors for Public Institutions in relation to 
the transfer of the patients from the Lunatic Hos- 
pital at South Boston to the State Asylum at Dan- 
vers. 

Read twice and passed. Sent up. 

free sour. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 submitted a report 
from the Committee on Finance on the order in- 
troduced into the last City Council, authorizing 
the Board of Aldermen to provide soup for the 
worthy poor during the winter months, at an ex- 
pense not exceeding $4800— That, under the provi- 
sions of chapter 374 of the acts of the General 
Court for the year 1K74, the amount which the city 
can appropriate for that purpose is limited to 
§4574. As there are only two months remaining in 
which it has been customary to furnish such re- 
lief, your committee recommend the passage of 
the order in a new draft, as appended, making an 
appropriation of $3200. 

Ordered, That the Board of Aldermen be and it 
is hereby authorized to provide soup for the wor- 
thy poor during the months of February and 
March, 1X78, at an expense not exceeding three 
thousand two hundred dollars; and the Auditor of 
Accounts is hereby arthorized to transfer from 
the Reserved Fund the sum of $3200, to consti- 
tute a special appropriation to he entitled "Tem- 
porary Relief of the Poor." 

Passed to a second reading. 

Mr. Spenceley moved a suspension of the rule 
that the order might take its second reading. 



JANUARY 



24 



1878 



24 



Mr. Mowry of Ward 11—1 hope the rule will not 
be suspended. It is a grave and important mat- 
ter, and I should like to consider it a little fur- 
ther. 1 should like a little time to consider it. 

Mr. Spenceley — If it is a very grave and important 
one to the gentleman who has just sat down, it 
must be a grave and important one to the poor 
people in Boston who have nothing to feed them- 
selves with. It is an order that was laid over 
from last year, and it seems to me the gentleman 
has had time to consider it. I hope the rule will 
be suspended, and that we shall pass the order 
tonight, so that the poor people of Boston may 
have something on which they may be fed. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9— There are certain 
statistics on this subject of the distribution of 
soup that it may be well to present before the 
Couucil before this order passes. I think it is an 
important matter and I hope the rule will not be 
suspended. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— Statistics may be 
very interesting to the public, but they will not 
feed poor people. 

Mr. Rosnosky of Ward 16— I hope the rule will 
be suspended. I think reasons enough have been 
given why we should not delay it until next meet- 
ing. If we should do so it might take until the 
middle of the month of February before it can be 
passed and we be able to do anything for the poor. 

On motion of Mr. Spenceley, a yea and nay vote 
was ordered on the question of suspending the rule. 

The rule was suspended — yeas 60, nays 10: — 

Yeas— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, Brown, B. Brint- 
nall, N. Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Clapp, Col- 
by, Cox, Day, Denny, Devlin, Doherty, Drvnan, 
Fernald, Flynn, Ham, Hill, Rowland, Kelley, 
Kendricken, Kidney, Lauten, Lovering, McDon- 
ald, McGahey, McGaragle, McGeough, Mullane, 
Mullen, Nason, O'Connor, Pearl, Perham, Plimp- 
ton, J. B. Richardsou, Roach, Roberts, Rosnosky, 
Rust, E. H. Sampson, Santry, H. N. Sawyer, N. 
Sawyer, Shepard, Sibley, Smith, Spenceley, J. F. 
Taylor, J. Taylor, Thorndike, Toppan, Ward, Web- 
ster, Whicher, Wilson, Wolcott, Woolley, Wy- 
man— 60. 

Nays — Messrs. Barnard, Coe, Crocker, Danforth, 
Hibbard, Mowry, Pierce, M. W. Richardson, 
O. H. Sampson, Thompson— 10. 

Absent or not voting — Mr. Hollis — 1. 

The order was read a second time and put upon 
its passage. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 moved to amend the 
order by inserting after the words "worthy poor" 
the words "of Boston." 

Mr. McGaragle asked if it was necessary to in- 
sert where it is to be distributed. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 said the Board of Al- 
dermen had always provided for that. 

Mr. Sampson's amendment was adopted. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 moved to amend so 
that th j aid shall be distributed under the direc- 
tion of the Overseers of the Poor. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 certainly hope that 
the amendment will not prevail. As I said be- 
fore, statistics will not feed the poor; and if they 
have to go through all the red tape of the Over- 
seers of the Poor they will never receive any soup. 
It has been a custom, year after year, to attempt 
to hook that same amendment on to the order, 
and it has always been voted down, and I hope we 
will do it tonight. If we are going to do anything 
for humanity in its present suffering condition, 
let us do it in the way that will reach them imme- 
diately. If we attempt anything of that kind, it 
will be the Fourth of July before the soup will 
reach them. I hope the amendment will not pre- 
vail. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5—1 object to the amend- 
ment. This soup is intended to be given to the 
worthy poor, not to paupers. I may nol be much 
upon quoting law, but I think that if any one re- 
ceives help from the poor he goes upon the books 
as a pauper. This is intended for deserving poor 
citizens who need temporary relief. Whatever 
statistics can be obtained from the police as to 
the needs of these people, I hope will be obtained; 
but I would rather not see it distributed by the 
Overseers of the Poor for that reason. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 have been informed 
that when this distribution has taken place here- 
tofore, the cooking has taken up about all the 
funds, and that a very miserable substitute for 
soup is furnished, and that it is very doubtful if 
it got into the hands of the worthy poor. I think 
it is very doubtful whether under the statute pro- 
viding for the relief of the poor the city has any 
legal right to distribute or provide for the relief 
of the poor except through the superintendence 



of the overseers. They have a central bureau in 
which is collected all the information regarding 
the worthy poor; they are always relieving those 
people, and it is a question whether they should 
be relieved in any other way than that pre- 
scribed by the statute. This is providing a special 
fund for the purpose and providing entirely new 
machinery. It can no doubt be done as we'll and 
as efficiently by the Overseers of the Poor as by 
the police. The gentleman from Ward 8 seems to 
doubt whether it can be done as well by the 
agency of the Overseers of the Poor. That is the 
agency provided by the statute. We put into their 
hands an appropriation amounting to $60,000 or 
$70,000, and if we can trust them to expend that 
amount, I think we can trust them to spend this. 

Mr. McGaragle— I recognize all the goodness of 
the Overseers of the Poor; but this is an exoendi- 
ture authorized by the Legislature of 1874 for this 
particular purpose. 

Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11— I would simply call at- 
tention to the report of the Chief of Police, City 
Document 7, on page 29, in the eighth line. He 
says — 

"This charity should be under the supervision 
of the Overseers of the Poor." 

That, at all events, shows what is his opinion on 
the subject, and all will agree that he is as well 
qualified to judge as anyone in the city of Boston. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11 — The act to which the 
gentleman from Ward 8 refers makes no provision 
for the distribution oi this relief. It merely pro- 
vides for the city to appropriate a certain amount 
for relief, the provision having already been made 
for its distribution — which is the Overseers of the 
Poor. 

Mr. McGaragle— it is news to me that the Legis- 
lature yet provided an act for the distribution of 
anything. They make laws fir this purpose, and 
they are competent to make laws: but they leave 
the distribution of the matter to the City Govern- 
ment. 

Mr. Brawley of Ward 19— Dire necessity in this 
matter calls for this Council to do away with red 
tape, and pass the order offered by the gentleman 
from Ward 17. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I appreciate the 
motive of the gentleman from Ward 9 in attempt- 
ing to place this charity in the hands of those who 
know the needs of the poor,and feel the dire neces- 
sity for it. Yet I feel the necessity of affording 
this relief at once, if anything is to be done at all. 
Similar relief has Deen given to the poor for quite 
a number of years— six, eight or nine — and it has 
been distributed under the direction of the Board 
of Aldermen, and more particularly by the Com- 
mittee on Police at the various station houses. 1 
am informed that the means of distributing it 
in that way are at hand, and can be used at 
once; and I think it is obvious to any gen- 
tleman here, who will reflect for a moment, that 
to put it into the hands of new parties, who 
are not provided with the means— I mean all the 
various implements and machinery— required, it 
must take a long time; and it is an old adage that 
while the grass grows the horse starves ; and 
while we are waiting for the manufacture of 
kitchens and ovens the poor will starve. For 
this year, therefore, I think this relief should be 
distributed by the parties who have done it for 
years back, and for the reasons I have given. But 
I do think that generally the Overseers of the 
Poor should have it, and had this order been of- 
fered earlier in the season, when we could have 
provided those things, I should have felt that we 
ought to put the distribution of the charity for 
the poor in the hands of those persons who are 
best qualified by experience to judge of the wants 
of the poor. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 would ask why, 
when the machinery is all prepared, it will take 
any longer to distribute it under the direction of 
the Overseers of the Poor than the Committee on 
Police? 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I cannot tell the 
reasou, but I think it will take some time loxger 
by the use of red tape. I cannot see how the 
means we are to give to the poor can reaoh them 
so quickly as by the ordinary channels which we 
are accustomed to use. I think the gentleman is 
right, as I have stated, upon the great principle; 
but it has come so late in the season, and 
the exigency is so great, as we all know, and 
therefore 1 think we ought to sacrifice something 
of principle— which I dislike ever to do, but I will 
do even that to prevent starvation; and it we do 
anything, it should be done now. Therefore, 
while this appropriation is not very large, I think 



a 5 



COMMON COUNCIL 



the best way to do it is in the way it has been 
done heretofore, for I think the relief will reach 
the poor quicker, and that is the great object at 
this time. 

On motion of Mr. Barry of Ward 22, the main 
question was ordered. 

Mr. Thompson's amendment was lost. 

The order was passed— yeas 61, nays 7: 

Yeas — Messrs. Barnard, Barry, Brawley, B. 
Brintnal), N. Y. Briutnall, Burke, Cannon, Clapp, 
Coe, Colby, Cox, Crocker, Day, Denny, Devlin, 
Doherty, Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, Ham, Hibbard, 
Hill, Hollis, Howland, Kelley, Kendricken, Kid- 
ney, Lauton, Lovering, McDonald, McGahey, Mc- 
Ga'ragle, McCeough, Mullane, Mullen, S'ason, 
O'Connor, Pearl, Perhaou, Plimpton, J. B. Rich- 
ardson, Roach, Roberts, Rosnosky. Rust, Santry, 
H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, Sibley, Smith, 
Spenceley, J. F. Taylor, J. Taylor, Thorndike, Top- 
pan, Ward, Webster. Wbicher. Wilson, Woolley, 
Wyman- 61. 

Says— Ale-sis. Danforth, Mowry, Pierce, M. W. 
Richardson, O. H. Sauipson.Thotupsoo.Wolcott— 7. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Brown, Hollis, E. 
H. Sampson. 

Subsequently Mr. Spenceley moved a reconsid- 
eration, hoping it would not prevail, which was 
lost. Sent up. 

PERMITS FOB AVOODKN BUILDINGS. 

Mr. McGaragle submitted the following from 
the Joint Committee on Survey and Inspection of 
Buildings: 

Report of leave to withdraw on petition of 
Henry Dudley for leave to enlarge a wooden build- 
inff on Elm street, Ward 23. Accepted. Sent up. 

Report and order for a permit to be issued to 
Samuel O. Reed to erect a woodeu building on 
Carleton street. Ward 15, according to application 
on rile in the office of the Inspector of Buildings. 

Order read twice and passed. 

Report of leave to withdraw on the petition of 
Thomas Mayo for modification of condition for 
erection of a stable in Ward 28. Accepted. Sent 
up. 

HARBOR HASTES, POLICE AM' 1 IKK BOATS. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 offered an order- 
That a joint special committee,consisting of three 
members of the Common Council, with such as 
the Board of Aldermen may join, be a committee 
to ascertain and report if any aud what changes 
can be made in the duties now performed by the 
Harbor Master, and police and fire boats, with a 
view of the consolidation thereof. Read twice 
and passed. 

Messrs. Spenceley of Ward li), Crocker of Ward 
9, and Barnard of Ward 24 were appointed on said 
committee. Sent up. 

1 \\ 1M. OUT PRIVATE STREETS. 

On motion of Mr. Perham of Ward 23, the three 
last sections of the annual report of the Street Com- 
mission were referred to the Joint Committee on 
Streets. Mr. Perhaua said they contained recom- 
mennations which should 
committee. Sent up. 

The sections referred to 
large number of petitions 
the laying out ol private ways as public streets in 
different parts ol the city. 

PROPOSED 1'iifl I.AK LOAN. 

Mr. Mowry ot Ward 11 offered an order— That 
the Committee on Finance be requested, before 
negotiating another loan, to consider and report 
upon the expediency of issuing a popular loan of 
the city in bonus of 950, $ 100, and $500, with in- 
terest coupons attached. Read twice and passed. 
Sent up. 

COLLECTOR'S DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Richardson Ol Ward 11 offered an order- 
That the City Collector be authorized to employ 
an additional clerk, for temporary duty in the 
office of Water Registrar, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $284; said amount to be paid from the 
revenue from Cochituate Water Works. Ordered 
to a second reading. 

PUBLIC BATHS. 

Mr. Pearl ol Ward 1 offered an order— That the 
Joint Standing Committee on Bathing be author- 
ized to repair and maintain the several bathing 
houses in the department under their charge, and 
to employ such assistants and take such measures 
for the care and preservation of said houses as 
they may deem expedient. 

The order was passed to a second reading. 

Mr. Pearl said it was a question whether the 
Auditor had a right to approve this month's ac- 
counts without the passage of the order, and he 
moved to suspeud the rule, that the order might 
be passed tonight. 



be considered by the 

are in regard to the 
before the board for 



The rule was suspended and the order was read 
a second time and put upon its passage. 

Mr. Pierce of Ward 24— Is it not usual to limit 
the amount of the expenditure? 

Mr. Pearl— This month's expenditure will come 
out of the last year's appropriation. 

Mr. Pierce— I supposed it was the old appropria- 
tion, and I also thought it was customary to 
limit the amount to be expended for this particu- 
lar purpose. 

Mr. Pearl— The appropriation for the next finan- 
cial year has not been asked for by the commit- 
tee; this is to come out of the balance of the old 
appropriation of last year. 

Mr. Richardson ot Ward 10— Will the gentleman 
be kind enough to state what the balance remain- 
ing on hand is? 

Mr. Pearl— I think there is some six thousand 
dollars. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 — I had the same im- 
pression that the gentleman from Ward 24 had— 
that it is usual to limit the amount. I do not know 
any necessity for it in this case, but it is a good 
principle. 

Mr. Thompson ot Ward !)— What is the nature of 
the expenditure to take place on the bath houses 
between now and the first of May? Is it simply 
for repairs? 

Mr. Pearl— This is merely a customary order 
which is offered the first week in each year. There 
were two houses sold last year, and the present 
committee, under instructions from the old com- 
mittee, are building two new houses, and have 
employed men to take charge of those houses, and 
they have hired a general superintendent, who is 
employed during the year. Those men have to be 
paid monthly, and this is merely a customary or- 
der offered e'ach year. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 — I don't understand 
that the gentleman has answered the question of 
the gentleman from Ward 'J as to what repairs 
are contemplated; what they are to be, and how 
much. I understand there is a balance ot a little 
over $6000 in the bands of the committee. Now, I 
don't know but they propose to build new bathing 
houses. I should feel a little better about it if the 
amount was limited, as is usual. As I said be- 
fore, it is a. very good principle to adhere to when 
you authorize a committee to go into an expendi- 
ture, and I should vote for it with less anxiety if 
it was limited. I move to lay it on the table. 

Mr. Pearl of Ward 1— I hope the motion will not 
prevail. As I said when I made the motion, I hope 
this order will pass tonight, that the men we em- 
ploy may receive their regular pay up to the first 
of February, when it is due. They were under the 
control of the committee of last year, and it was a 
questiou whether the Auditor had a right to audit 
their accounts under the new committee without 
the passage of this order. The appropriation last 
year was #25,000, and it is not all used 
up. We are building two houses to take 
the place of the old ones that were 
sold. In years past a contract was made for new 
houses at 94500 each. Last year a contract was 
made at $1800, and two nouses are now beine built 
ot twelve or fifteen hundred dollars each. 
While we are building them it is proper to hire 
men in the winter to keep them in repair and to 
keep the ice away from them. I hope the order 
will uass tonight, so that the men will get their 
pay on the Hist of the month, when it is due. 

The motion to lay on the table was lost aud the 
order was passed. Sent up. 

CTTT EMPLOYES RESIDING OUT OF THE CITY. 

Mr. Toppan of Ward .; offered the following: 

It is a well-known fact that there is a large 
number of city employes who reside out ol the 
city limits; daily discussions among the taxpay- 
ers that to employ any person not a citizen is an 
imposition, and to them a confession of weakness 
on our part that we have no citizens of ability in 
the city, and therefore dependent on the suburbs. 
Thousands of dollars of the public money are taken 
annually in this way ; not a cent is received from 
them to assist in carrying on the great expense of 
our city. Is it light? I say no. There ought to 
be something done to remedy this great evil. Now 
is the time to commence. 

( Ordered, That all employes of the city of Boston 
and that all employes for public work by contract 
shall be citizens of Boston. 

I lie order was read twice and Mr. Thompson of 
Ward 9 said that it was too important a matter to 
be passed without the action of some committee; 
and on his motion it was referred to the Commit- 
tee on Ordinances. Sent up. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. McDonald of Ward 
12. 



BOAJbiD OF ALDERMEN. 



26 



CITY OF BOS TON. 

Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

JANUARY 28, 187b. 



Regular meeting- at lour o'clock P. M., Alder- 
Stebbins, Chairman, presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 
Thirty traverse jurors were drawn for the 
January term of the Superior Court, First Session. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENT. 

Constable— Charles D. Annable. Confirmed. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Paving. Edwin R. Frost, 
for leave to erect an illuminated clock upon outer 
steps of sidewalk 109-111 Devonshire street; W. 
O. Taylor et al., that Adams street, Ward 24, he 
put in order; Pratt & Co. et al., that portions of 
Neponset avenue, Commercial street and Tenean 
street be put in order; James B. Aiken et al., that 
Norfolk street, Ward 24, be macadamized; Patrick 
Grace, for leave to sprinkle certain streets in 
Brighton. 

Robert Vose el at., for a plank walk on School 
and Harvard streets, Ward 24. 

South Boston Railroad Company, for a location 
of tracks in certain streets auu over Dover-street 
Bridge; also for leave to use tracks of Metropoli- 
tan Railroad Company in Milk, State, Congress 
and Devonshire streets. 

To the Committee on, Health on the part of the 
Board. Petitions for leave to occupy stables by 
James O'Brien, new wooden, two horses, COO Par- 
ker street; D. H. McKay, new wooden, two 
horses, Newport street; John Farquharst & Sons, 
old wooden, two horses, East street, rear 20 and 
22; James A. Riedell & Co., new brick, eighty 
horses, Newbury street, corner Hereford street; 
John Kelly, new wooden, two horses, Tufts street; 
Elijah J. Mclntire, new wooden, two horses, Cor- 
bett street; A. E. McLaughlin, new wooden, two 
horses, Centre street. 

To the Joint Special Committee on Nomination 
of Inspectors of Lighters. John Kelly, for ap- 
pointment as weigher, etc., of lighters. 

To the Committee on Lamps. J. R. O. Hurd, 
that a gas lamp be placed in front of the M. E. 
Church, Parkman street, Ward 24. 

To the Committee on Licenses. John Drynan, 
for leave to give an athletic exhibition at Beetho- 
ven Hall, Feb. 20. 

To the Committee on Police. Charles E. Guild, 
for leave to project a druggist's mortar at corner 
of Berkeley and Tremont streets. 

To the Committee on Common on the part of the 
Board. William Blakemore, tor leave to remove 
two trees from Brown avenue. 

To the Committee on Armories. Company D, 
First Battalion of Infantry, lor furniture for ar- 
mory. 

To the Committee on Sewers. James Fitton et 
al., for a sewer in Saratoga street. 

To the Committee on Claims. John Raddin, to 
be paid for a set of cushions furnished Engine 
No. 7. 

To the Committee on Farks. Petitions of James 
L. Little, Samuel C. Cobb, Martin Brimmer, Na- 
thaniel J. Bradlee, William Gaston, and seventy- 
seven others; Abrarn French & Co., Alanson W. 
Beard, William H. Horton, Weston Lewis, Samuel 
Johnson, C. C. Luce, Philip Straup, and 150 oth- 
ers; H. 1 Bowditch, Edward Wigglesworth, D. 
Humphrey Storer, John P. Reynolds, George Ty- 
ler Bigelow, Abbott Lawrence and ninety others, 
for the immediate development of Back Bay Park 
and avenues. 

HEARING ON PETITION FOR STEAM ENGINE. 

The petition of B. F. Sturtevant for leave to lo- 
cate and use a steam engine and boiler in rear of 
Green street, Ward 23, was considered on an order 
of notice for a hearing. No one appeared to ob- 
ject and the petition was referred to the Commit- 
tee on Steam Engines. 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Reports of leave to withdraw on petitions, of 
Henry Dudley, for leave to erect a wooden build- 
ing on Elin street, Ward 23, and of Thomas Mayo, 
tor leave to erect a similar structure on Green 
street, Ward 23. Severally accepted in con- 
currence. 



Keport and order to allow Samuel G. Reed leave 
to erect a wooden building on Carlton street, 
Ward 25. Order passed in concurrence. 

Order for appointment of a committee (Messrs. 
Spenceley, Crocker and Barnard, to be joined) to 
consider the subject of rearranging or consolidat- 
ing the duties performed by the Harbor Master's, 
police and lire boats. Passed in concurrence, and 
Aldermen Perkins and Viles were joined to said 
committee. 

Report (inexpedient) to adopt a joint rule re- 
quiring action of committees to be kept from the 
public until reported. Accepted in concurrence. 

Order for Committee on Finance to consider the 
expediency of issuing a popular loan in small 
sums. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for Superintendent of Health to contract 
for horses and exchanges, hay, grain, vehicles 
and materials for his department during the pres- 
ent year. Passed in concurrence. 

Report and order making suitable reference of 
the several topics in the Mayor's address. Order 
passed in concurrence. 

Report and order for Committee on Public 
Lands to take possession of certain estates sold 
to the city for unpaid taxes. Order passed in con- 
currence. 

An order that all employes and laborers on pub- 
lic works in this city shall reside in Boston came 
up referred to the Committee on Ordinances. Con- 
curred. 

Order to refer to Committee on Streets the con- 
cluding portion of the Street Coinmissioners'ian- 
nual report. Passed in concurrence. 

Request of Board of Health for the transfer of 
$300 to their general appropriation. Referred to 
Committee on Finance in concurrence. 

SOUP. 

A report and order came up to appropriate 
$3200 for furnishing soup to worthy poor families 
of Boston. 

Alderman Faunce moved to amend by inserting 
the word "food" instead of the word "soup." He 
said he did that for the reason that there are 
times when solid food is more necessary than soup. 

Alderman Viles inquired if that would n't send 
it back to the Council, and the Chairman said it 
would if the amendment was adopted. 

Alderman Viles— As the time is so short, I hope 
we shall not make any change. 

Alderman Perkins — I trust that the amendment 
of the Alderman from Roxbury will pass. I have 
always had very grave doubts as to whether this 
is the most expedient method of dispensing this 
charity. As I understand it, the principal object 
of distributing it through the police is that the 
recipients may not become paupers under the 
law. There is no questioa but that in many cases 
the money can be more wisely used and more 
judiciously expended and accomplish a great deal 
more good than by a miscellaneous distribution of 
soup. Although 1 can very well understand why 
the Alderman from the West End wants this 
thing done— so that those who are in need of it 
can receive it — nevertheless I hope the amend- 
ment will be adopted and the thing be done urop- 
erly. 

Alderman McLean— I did not propose to say a 
word upon this matter, but I hope the amend- 
ment will not prevail. It seems to me that the 
distribution of this money in good, thick, hearty 
soup will go further than food. As it is to be 
done to temporarily relieve the necessities of the 
poor, it seems to me that the sooner this charity is 
distributed the better it will be. I think that 
more good will come from it if it is done as it has 
been done in the past, although I am free to say 
that if we had time 1 should prefer to have it 
done by the Overseers of the Poor; but in consid- 
eration of the lateness of the season, I trust it 
will be done as it has been in the past. I think 
the soup will do more good than loud. 

Alderman Faunce— I understand that the 
amendment does not prevent the distribution of 
soup, but that it adds other things in case of 
emergency; and there may be cases when some- 
thing else will be better than soup. 1 think it is 
better to use the word food than soup, for that 
reason. It will not delay the matter, as Thursday 
is the last day of the month and the Council wil'l 
meet on that day. 

Alderman McLean— What does the Alderman 
propose to do— whether they are to have money 
or provisions? 

Alderman Faunce— That is left to the Board of 
Aldermen to decide. It does not change the fact. 



27 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



The amendment was lost and the order was 
passed in concurrence— yeas 12, nays 0. 

Subsequently Alderman Viles offered an order- 
That the Committee on Police be authorized to 
make the necessary arrangements (or distributing 
BOUp at the several police stations during the 
months of February and March, 1878; the expense, 
not exceeding $3200, to he charged to the special 
appropriation for Temporary Relief of the Poor. 
Read twice and passed. 

CARRIAGE HIKE. 

An order came up to adopt an additional joint 
rule, to be called section 2l,jto the effect that all 
carriages hired by committees or members shall 
be procured through, or reported to, the Messen- 
ger. 

Alderman Harris— I hope the committee will 
give us some reason which induced them to re- 
port this rule, ft does seem to mo as though it is 
not lequired at all, and unless there i> some good 
and sufficient reason lor its adoption, 1 for one 
shall move its indefinite postponement. 

Alderman Viles — I don't know that I have any 
new light to give upon this subject. 1 was in 
hopes this matter of the rules and orders would 
not come before this Board this present year; but 
there was an order introduced Into the City Coun- 
cil :o regulate carriage hire, and it was referred 
to the Committee on Ordinances, who, after care- 
ful consideration of it, in their good judgment, 
which 1 think was a compliment, referred it 
to the Committee on Rules and Orders, and hence 
we find it before us. Alter considering this 
matter some time we reported that order. As 
1 said last Monday, I don't believe in this 
order exactly, but it is the best thing 1 could 
get done with it. There had been some 
trouble with the members of the Government 
heretofore about taking carriages in distant parts 
of the city, and when the bill came in it would be 
put in their pockets and carried there for some 
time, and nobody would know anything about it. 
This is something like putting another padlock 
on the pocket, and I think it will do no harm and 
may do some good. 

A'lderman Whidden— Does it include carriage 
hire for every purpose ? If a committee are obliged 
to take a c rriage into the suburbs, must they go 
to the City Messenger? 

Alderman Yiles— No, sir, I presume it is discre- 
tionary with committees to take carriages when 
they wish to. A great many bills for carriages 
have been delayed ; some came in this year after 
the Government went out, and the City Messen- 
ger did not know anything about them. And it 
will take some trouble to look them up. 

Alderman McLean — The gentleman will see that 
if he and his Committee on Paving happen to be 
out in the suburbs he will go and hire a carriage 
and notify the City Messenger that he has hired a 
carriage for a certain purpose, and the City Messen- 
ger keeps a record of all carriages hired by himself 
or any committee and the object for which car- 
riages are hired by the committees themselves, 
whenever he is notified. This matter was recom- 
mended for the purpose of protecting the city 
against loose management in hiring carriages. 
It was stated before the committee, as the chair- 
man might have told you, that persons in the out- 
lying sections of the city had kept bills in their 
pockets tor some time— perhaps purposely, and 
perhaps not— until the last Government expired, 
and nobody seemed to be responsible lor them. 
It is intended that there may be some 
check upon this loose way of hiring car- 
riages, and in also giving notice to those hav- 
irg carriages to let that they must have the 
bills in within seven days. I presume that we 
should not be leading strings in these things, 
but as public servants 1 think we ought to yield 
something, and I hope this rule will pass. If my 
friend from Charlestown should happen to hire a 
carriage over in that district, or in some other 
section of the city, it will lie very easy for him to 
notify the City Messenger, and the city Messenger 
will also be able to see that a carriage is not paid 
for that is not used. It has been stated that when 
two carriages have been ordered to a place and 
only one used, two carriages were charged for, 
and" I take it that the Alderman from Charlestown 
here, and the other gentlemen, desire to protect 
the city; and believing that, I will vote for the 
order. 

Alderman Harris— To test the sense of the 
Hoard, I move the indefinite postponement of the 
order. 

The motion was declared lost. Alderman Har- 



ris doubted the vote. The Hoard diviaed-3 for, 
8 against. 
The order was passed in concurrence. 

l'l BUO BATHS. 

An order came up lor Joint Committee on Bath- 
ing to make repairs and procure attendants upon 
the several bathhouses. The order was laid on 
the table, on motion of Alderman Perkins , who 
said that he intended to offer an order to place the 
Bathing Department where it should be— under 
the charge of the Board ol Health. 

Later in the session Alderman Perkins offered 
an order— That the Committee on Ordinances be 
requested to consider the expediency of placing 
the Public Bathing Department under the charge 
of the Board of Health, and providing by ordi- 
nance for such change of supervision, p'assed. 
Sent down. . 

Subsequently, onlmotion of Alderman Viles, the 
order to authorize the Committee on Bathing to 
make certain repairs on the bath houses, etc., was 
taken : rom the table and passed in concurrence, 
Alderman Viles stating that, though he was not a 
member of the Committee on Bathing, yet he per- 
haps knew as much about that department as any 
other member, and the delay of this order will 
block the work of the department, it was neces- 
sary to pass it, and it required no additional ap- 
propriation, but the expense is to be paid from 
the balance of the old appropriation. 

REPORT8 OF CITJ OFFICERS. 

Annual Report of Seeder oj Weights and Meas- 
ures. Expenditures ior 1877, $4844. 

Total number of scales, weights and measures 
tested during the year 1877: 

Scales 3,207 

Weigh ts 10.630 

Dry measures 1,765 

Wet measures 2J757 

Weights condemned '276 

Measures condemned 301 

Scales condemned unfit for use 46 

Scales' use forbidden until made to conform to 

standard 427 

Weights and poises adjusted before sealing.'..!!! 5,031 
Weights and poises light, from 1 dram to 8 

ounces 4,883 

Weights and poises heavy 148 

Sin vcynrs' tape measures tested 4 

Yard sticks sealed 51 

Charcoal baskets sealed 33 

Charcoal baskets condemned 12 

Scales requiring much labor to adjust before 

sealing 1,000 

The class of cheap scales and weights, which 
are made by irresponsible persons so far as 
known, .and sold without any regard to accuracy, 
— and the same can be said of many of the weights 
sold with these scales,— are cast in various found- 
eries, taken from the mould without any test, yet 
bearing on their face the mark of 1" pound, 2 
pounds, 4 pounds, etc., and put upon the market 
purporting to be what they represent; yet in 
point of tact they are a cheat and a fraud, and 
the buyer, and sometimes the seller, is thereby de- 
prived of his or their just weight. 

The importance of correct scales and weights is 
attracting more attention from the public than in 
the past, as a result of the care and legislation 
upon the subject. In some of the States and in 
the Dominion of Canada various kinds of scales 
and balances are prohibited from use by law, 
more especially those most easily used to defraud 
the public as well as those which a change in the 
temperature will affect. 

The large sale of charcoal within the limits of 
the city, by persons residing in the suburban cit- 
ies and towns, has very largely increased from 
year to year, until it has reached an amount hard- 
ly conceived of by our citizens who, casually pass- 
ing our busy streets, see the charcoal man dis- 
charging his wagon at one of our hotels or at 
mauy of our dwellings. It has to a large extent 
superseded the use of the various kinds of kin- 
dling wood of former times. The persons dealing 
in this article are, for the most, part, non-resi- 
dents, who, with a few exceptions, care but lit- 
tle for the law regulating its sale, and evade it by 
every means possible, when an opportunity of- 
fers. The statute law Is very plain 'now 
what a two-bushel basket shrll contain, and 
yet they have, from year to year, sold with impu- 
nity, hardly fearing interruption, from a basket 
which held a less quantity than the law allowed. 
In the early part of the season this department's 
attention was directed to this fraud, and several 
wagons were stopped while coming in from the 
surrounding towns to dispose of their loads. 



JANUARY 



S'8 



1878 



28 



Their baskets were taken possession of, examined 
at the office, and found deficient in the necessary 
size. They were condemned and destroyed. New 
ones holding the required amount we're ordered 
to be procured; they were tested and branded 
when correct. This action hao been followed up 
so closely that no luture delinquencies of this 
kind will'be likely to occur. All persons purchase 
ing charcoal, if they will take the trouble to ex- 
amine the basket used, if a legal one, will find it 
branded '-Boston Sealer." 

Annual Report of the (My Surveyor. The 
amount expended during the year has been — 

Expenses of city proper, South and East 

Boston, and Charlestown 820,582.11 

Expenses of the Roxbury branch office 4,799.1 6 

Expenses of the Dorchester branch office... 5,377.97 
Expenses of the West Koxbury branch office. 5,296.71 
Expenses of the Brighton branch office 2,010.83 

Total expenditure from appropriation for 
surveying for 1877 #38,066.78 

The report includes a list of the plans drawn 
during the year. 

Annual Report of the Park Commissioners. The 
Board refer to City Document, 104, 1877, for details 
of the work done by them during the year. In 
regard to the Back Bay Bark tney say — 

On making the final measurmeuts it was found 
that 106 115-1000 acres had been secured, and, as 
in our opinion no part of this can well be dis- 
pensed with, we respectfully ask for a further ap- 
propriation of 113,000 to pay for the excess of 
2 815-1000 acres ; this is comprised in a part of the 
Long-wood entrance as shown on the plan of the 
Back Bay Park accompanying our last report. 
B We would also recommend that authority be given 
to purchase, at not exceeding ten cents per 
square foot, the land between Beacon street and 
Charles River, opposite the Beacon entrance as 
shown on the plan, thus continuing that entrance 
300 feet in width to the river. 

We have reason to believe that with this au- 
thority we can make a satisfactory arrangement 
with the Boston & Roxbury Mill Corporation, 
which owns the land. The amount required will 
probably not exceed $3000. 

The commissioners again recommend that a 
portion of the Austin Farm, to be used as a nur- 
sery for trees, plants and shrubs, be placed under 
their control, as the preparatory work should be 
entered upon at the earliest practical moment. 

The expenditures have been as follows : Balance 
of appropriation Jan. 1, 1877, $2492.16; amount 
appropriated Dec. 24, 1877, $3000; total, $5492.16. 
Expenditures from Jan. 1, 1877, to Jan. 1, 1878, 
$3444.68 ; balance unexpended Jan. 1, 1878, 
$2047.48. The above amount of $3444.68 was ex- 
pended as follows: Salary of clerk, $1162 50; engi- 
neer and assistants, expenses, etc., $2244.86; sta- 
tionery, $12.10; printing, $5.82; maps and plans, 
$8.50; office expenses— washing floors and towels, 
etc., $10.90; total, 3444.68. 

Annual Report of Superintendent of Sewers. 
The amount expended has been $158,548.97, and 
sewers have been laid as follows; 

City proper.... 6,624 feet 820,310.34 

" " .... 78 catch-basins. 7,595.51 

South Boston.. 2,257 feet 4,349.61 

" " .. 53 catch-basins. 5,465.50 

Charlestown.. 429 feet 535.99 

64 catch-basins. 6,776.89 

Roxbury 9,267 feet 17,552.99 

109 catch- basins. 10,555.90 

Dorchester.... 7,595 feet 16,458.93 

78 catch-basins. 7,397.26 

West Roxbury. 3,876 feet 7,798.54 

62 catch-basins. 5,400.72 

East Boston... 1,269 feet 1,787.58 

25 catch-basins. 1'961.32 

Brighton 3 catch-basins. 339.65 

(31,317ft., costing.... $68,79". 98 

Totals,? 472 catch-basins. 45,492.75 

(Miscellaneous expenses 44,262.24 

8158,548.97 

The whole length of sewers in the city is now 
about 180y 2 miles. Assessments have been levied 
by the Board of Aldermen, and the bills sent to 
the Collector, to the amount of $35,756.69. The 
Collector has received, during the year, from as- 
sessments, $88,802,71. During the year 1450 per- 
mits have been given to construct and repair 
house connections, and about 1150 loads of sewage 
matter removed from the, sewers. 

SALARY OF CLERK OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

A communication was received fiom the Park 
Commissioners in regard to the salary of their 



clerk, which they fixed at $1150 per annum, they 
believing this to be the amount established by 
the City Council, as it was so printed in the offi- 
cial proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, Feb. 
19, 1877. He has been paid at this rate until re- 
cently, when the Auditor discovered that the 
amount fixed by the Council was $1050 per annum. 
The commissioners addressed a letter on the sub- 
ject to the City Solicitor, who decid- 
ed that chapter 185, section 3, of acts 
1875, conferred upon the Board the power ot ap- 
pointing its clerks and fixing their compensation, 
and no action of the City Council has taken or 
can take away that power. The Auditor inquired 
of the City Solicitor if he could allow the clerk 
$1150 after the order of the City Council. The 
Solicitor decided that the Auditor must follow 
the orders of the City Council, and cannot deter- 
mine a question of difference between the Coun- 
cil and the Park Commissioners. 
Referred to Committee on Parks. Sent down. 

JAIL EXPENSES. 

A requisition was received from the Sheriff of 
Suffolk County for $1609.65, for exDenses at the 
jail for February. Ordered paid. 

ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATION FOR SEWER DE- 
PARTMENT. 

The chairmar. submitted a report from the Com- 
mittee on Finance on request of Committee on 
Sewers for additional appropriation, recommend- 
ing the passage of an order— That the Auditor of 
Accounts be and he hereby is authorized to trans- 
fer from the Reserved Fund to the appropriation 
for Sewers the sum of $9000. Read twice and 
passed— yeas 12, nays 0. Sent down. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Guild submitted reports from the 
Committee on Licenses as follows: 

Amusement Licenses Granted -Martin E. Casey, 
to give a dramatic entertainment at the Turn 
Halle, Middlesex street, on Feb. 8. 

Victuallers Licensed— Bryant E. Crawford, 209 
Cambridge street; Richard, Hain & Co., 44 Port- 
land and '4Gy 2 Short Sudbury street; Elisha E. Da- 
vis, 136 Lincoln street; Richardson & Stanley, 7 
Sudbury street; E. B. Allen, 760 Washington 
street. 

Minors' Applications Granted— Thirteen news- 
boys. 

Wagon Licenses Granted— John McNamara, 9 
India street; Charles H. Tufts, Avery street; G. 
E. Gammon, 19 Chauncy street; S. J. Pressey, 
Clarendon street. 

Auction Licenses Renewed— T. B. Moses, Jr., & 
Co., 581 Washington street and at corner of East 
and Federal streets; M. J. O'Brien, 280 Broadway. 

Pawnbrokers and Dealers in Second-hand Arti- 
cles Licensed— George Casale and others, in vari- 
ous parts of the city. 

Severally accepted. 

PROJECTING SIGN. 

Alderman Viles submitted a report from the 
Committee on Police in favor of granting a per- 
mit to J. P. T. Percival to place a druggist's mor- 
tar in front of 215 Washington street. Accepted. 

COLLECTION OF UNPAID POLL OR PERSONAL. 
TAXES. 

Alderman Harris submitted a report from the 
Committee on Legislative Matters in favor of the 
passage of the order for the Mayor to petition the 
Legislature for an act providing for the settle- 
ment of unpaid poll and personal taxes, as in said 
order set forth. The order was passed. Sent 
down. 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Whidden submitted the following 
from the Committee on Paving: 

Report— That leave be granted William R. Cav- 
anagh to move a block of two wooden buildings 
from East street, corner of West Fifth street to 
Ninth street. Accepted. 

Reports and orders of notice for hearings on 
Monday, Feb. 18, at four o'clock P. M., on the pe- 
titions of Lynn & Boston Railroad Company for 
leave to run their cars to Temple place, and of 
Metropolitan Railroad Company for an addition 
to portions of their locations on Clarendon and 
Bovlston streets. Orders severally passed. 

Order to remove the bridge over Smelt Brook on 
Parker street, and fill the street at said brook 
with earth or gravel; estimated cost $3000. Read 
twice and passed. 

Order to grade and gravel Northampton street 
between Columbus avenue and the Providence 



29 



BOARD OF ALDEKMEN. 



Railroad; estimated cost $450. Read twice and 
passed. 

Order to grade Ruggles street as recently laid 
out on land of K. T. Paine, Jr., near Cary street,. 
Read twice and passed. 

IMPROVED SEWEBAQE. 

Alderman Whidden submitted the following: 
The joint special committee appointed to take 
charge of the construction of an improved sys- 
tem of sewerage, respectfully recommend the 
passage of the accompanying order taking for 
the purposes of a pumping station a parcel of 
land situated at Old Harbor Point, the said land 
being taken under the authority ol chapter l»i ol 
the acts of 1876, entitled "An act to empower the 
city of Boston to lay and maintain a main sewer 
discharging at tfoon Island in Boston Harbor and 
for other purposes. ' 

The order lor the taking describes the property 
in detail. It was laid over. 

SHUTTEKS l'OK ARMOKV BUILDING. 

Alderman Slade offered an order— That the Su- 
perintendent ol Public ISuililings be authorized, 
under the direction of the Committee on Ar- 
mories, to place suitable iron shutters on the ar- 
mory occupied by Battery A, M. V. M , on Ware- 
ham street; the expense, not exceeding .S700, to 
be charged to the appropriation for Armories. 
Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

LAMP DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Whitou offered an order— That the 
Superintendent of Lamps be and he is hereby au- 
thorized, under the approval of the Committee on 
Lamps during the municipal year 1878, to contract 
for and purchase the lampposts, brackets, burn- 
ers, cocks, tips, lanterns, tools, stable supplies 
and such other articles as shall be found neces- 
sary for the carrying on of the Lamp Department, 



also to employ sucn number of men as may be 
necessary; the cost thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation for Lamps. Passed. 

ARBITRATION OF STREET DAMAGES. 

Ahlerman Perkins offered an order— That when- 
ever the Committee on Streets of this Board deem 
it for the best interest of the city to refer claims 
for damages or betterments relating to the laying 
out or widening ot streets to arbitration for set- 
tlement, the said committee is hereby authorized 
to refer such claims, with the approval of his 
Honor the Mayor and the City Solicitor. Read 
twice and passed. 

NUISANCE IN CIIARLESTOWN. 

Alderman Perkins offered an order— That his 
Honor the Mayor be requested to petition the 
Legislature for an act to abate a public nuisance 
in the ( barlestown District, by filling the territo- 
ry northerly from the Eastern Railroad and west- 
erly from Canal street; such act to provide that 
the" city of Boston shall have a lien upon said 
territory for the expense incurred in abating said 
nuisance. Read twice and passed. Sent down. 

FRANKLIN FUND. 

Alderman Whiton offered an order— That a com- 
mittee of two members of this Board be appoint- 
ed to examine the accounts of the Treasurer of 
the Frauklin Fund. Passed, and Aldermen Whiton 
and Kaunce were appointed said committee. 

1 HE APPROACHES TO THE FERRIES. 

Alderman McLean offered an order— That the 
Joint Committee on East Boston Ferries consider 
and report upon the expediency of the City Coun- 
cil requesting the Board of Street Commissioners 
to lay out as public streets the avenues from the 
ferry slips to Commercial and Sumner streets. 
Passed. Sent down. 

Adjourned, on motion ot Alderman Viles. 



so 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JANUARY 31, 1878. 



Regular meeting- at 7.30 o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Pope, President, in the chair. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN. 

Annual reports of the City Surveyor, Sealer of 
Weights and Measures, Superintendent of Sewers 
and Park Commissioners, severally placed on file. 

Communication from the Park Commissioners 
in reference to the salary of their clerk, and sun- 
dry petitions, were referred in concurrence. 

Report in favor and passage of order to petition 
for an act in relation to settlement of uncollect- 
able taxes. Report accepted and order passed in 
concurrence. 

Orders to report on expediency of the following 
measures : 

1. Of requesting the Street Commissioners to 
lay out as public streets the avenues from the 
ferry slips to Commercial and Sumner streets. 
Passed in concurrence. 

2. Of placing the Public Bathing Department 
in charge of Board of Health. Referred, on mo- 
tion of Mr. Pearl of Ward 1, to the Committee on 
Bathing. [For subsequent action see later in the 
session.] 

Report and order for a transfer from Reserved 
Fund to appropriation for sewers of the sum of 
$9000. Order passed to a second reading. 

NUISANCE IN CHARLESTON**. 

An order came down for the Mayor to petition 
the Legislature for an act authorizing the city to 
abate a nuisance in Charlestown, the city to have 
a lien on the land filled. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11— I hope the Council will 
not concur with the upper board in the passage of 
this order, whict involves an expenditure of a 
million dollars for the rilling alone, to say nothing 
of the damages. I understand that it comes from 
no committee whatever, and fH> it is a subject 
which needs consideration I hope we shall not 
concur. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5—1 do not know where this 
order originated, or the object of it; but I sup- 
pose it is intended to lead to some measure to 
abate a nuisance. I cannot see any harm iu pe- 
titioning the Legislature for the right to fill the 
land and have a lien upon it in case the tilling is 
done. I should hesitate to vote much money to do 
the tilling, provided we have the right from the 
Legislature, except in case of absolute necessity. 
So far as I understand i f .. this nuisance can be 
aoated without much outlay by the city; 
and that I understand to be the views 
of the Board of Health, who have considered the 
matter. Sewers empty there and cause much of 
this nuisance, but there is a large amount of ter- 
ritory which I cannot see that the city of Boston 
is responsible for, as it belongs to private parties. 

Mr. Mowry — Has it been before any committee 
■whatsoever? 

Mr. Sibley— I stated that I did not know where 
this order originated. 1 never heard of it until I 
read of its passage in the Board of Aldermen. 
The matter was before the Committee on Health 
and the Board of Health last year, and the nui- 
sance was admitted without any doubt; but, as 
was stated at the time, it was hoped that the city 
would get out of its part without much outlay. 
There is no money to be expended under this 
order, and after the act passes it will be for the 
City Council to say what shall be done. 

Mr. Mowry moved the reference of the order to 
the Committee on Legislative Matters. 

Mr. Richardson ot Ward 10— It seems to me that 
we are in neediof facts a little more than we have 
in regajd to this measure. I think I can say, per- 
haps without any breach of confidence, that I ex- 
pected to find upon my desk a communication 
from the Board of Health in regard to this matter; 
but I do not find it . I noticed that this order 
passed the Board of Aldermen without any dis- 
cussion whatever. I understand that the fee in 
the property, or land or bog, or whatever it is, re- 
ferred to, is in the Eastern Railroad, and when I 
first saw the order I had a suspicion that some- 
body had land to sell. I may be wrong, but as 
near as I can find out, it will take a very large sum 



of money to fill that land, and some gentlemen 
have said, since the order passed the Board of 
Aldermen, that it will cost a million dollars. 
It has not been before any committee, and we 
do not know officially that a nuisance exists 
there which requires any additional authority 
from the Legislature to abate it, and I certainly 
think it ought to go to some committee, and I 
nope it will go. It seems to me it should go to 
the Committee on Health in the first place, to de- 
termine if there is a nuisance. Those gentlemen 
familiar with the locality undoubtedly know, and 
I should take the statement of the gentleman 
from Ward 5 in regard to it. But it seems to me 
that before we commit ourselves by going to the 
General Court and getting an act, we ought to 
know just what act we want, what powers we 
want, and the nature and extent of them ; and, 
therefore, I should think it would be well for the 
City Council to be advised as to the nature and 
extent of the nuisance itself. I should think it 
would be better to refer it to the Committee on 
Health in the first place, to determine the necessi- 
ty of this act, unless gentlemen are prepared to 
take the matter for granted. 

Mr. Brintnall of Ward 5— This subject of filling 
those flats in Charlestown was before the Com- 
mittee on Health last year, and a public hearing 
was given last summer which lasted three or four 
days, and nearly all the citizens of Charlestown 
affected by this nuisance were present and gave 
their testimony at the time. Reports of that hear- 
ing were published in all the papers in Boston 
very fully at the time. It has been before the 
Board of Health for two years to my knowledge, 
and they made reports that they could not. pro- 
ceed to abate this nuisance on account of the ex- 
pense that would be borne by the city, with- 
out any right of redemption from the 
railroads who own the land. The object 
of this order is that the city may nave 
a lien upon the land, and if the railroads refuse 
to pay the expense, the land will be sold by the 
city to pay for the tilling. An estimate was made 
of the cost of filling this entire piece of land, and 
the cost for the entire piece was about $240,0u0, 
and there is some difference between that and a 
million, so that if we can get an act from the 
Legislature for the city to have a lien upon the 
land it would n't cost the city a cent. This nui- 
sance has been talked about time and again in the 
City Council, and in the papers last year. All the 
members who were here last year know all about 
it. As 1 said before, if this act is obtained I don't 
know that it will cost the city a cent. 
. Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— Last fall a gentleman 
prominently connected with the Lowell Railroad 
came to me and asked me if I would make some 
investigations about this filling 1 did so, and 
went to the Board of Health, and they said it was 
to be tilled by the Eastern and the Fitchburg rail- 
roads, and my object in going to see about it was 
that this railroad owned a gravel bank that they 
would like to sell for such tilling, and the Board 
of Health informed iue that the two railroad com- 
panies 1 have mentioned were going to fill it. But 
I see it has not been done this year, and they ex- 
pected it would be done last fall. I believe it is 
claimed that the property belongs to both those 
corporations. 

Mr. Speuceley of Ward 19—1 find by the pro- 
ceedings of the Board of Aldermen last year that 
this report was received from the Board of Health 
and was presented by Alderman Viles. 

"In answer to the order of the City Council, 
which 'instructed the Committee on Health to re- 
port an order tor relief upon the petition of citi- 
zens of the Fourth Ward for the abatement ot a 
nuisance,' and relerred to the Board of Health, 
we beg to state that the opinion of the City Coun- 
cil given to the Board of Health upon the ques- 
tion of abating this nuisance reached this board 
the second week in October; whereupon sound- 
ings and estimates for work, which must precede 
tilling, were procured, and much exertion made to 
have work commence this season. It was not 
thought advisable, however, to commence the 
building ot bulkheads and the extension of the 
sewer this fall, which we were advised could not 
be finished before cold weather. The Board of 
Health proposes to begin the work at the earliest 
practicable day, and forward the work as fast as 
possible. Respectfully submitted, 

S. H. Durgin, Chairman." 

It seems that they already have power to do 
this, and that they contemplate doing this work, 
and that just as soou as the season would permit, 
they intended to commence it and carry it 



JANUARY 31, 1878 



31 



out. If this be a fact, I don't see why we should 
petition the Legislature for a right which already 
exists. Alderman Viles says — 

Alderman "Viles said — 

"That is the report of tbe Board of Health which 
was handed to me a few moments ago. They in- 
form me tbat the sewer will have to be extended 
and a great many piles driven upon which to ex- 
tend it; and that it will taue some time longer 
than this fall will allow to complete it. Bulk- 
heads will have to be built out there to do it. 
They also inform me that the Fitchburg and East- 
ern railroads will commence this work at the ear- 
liest opportunity, but not before spring." 

Then Alderman Thompson said — 

"One cause of the difficulty is in consequence of 
the city of Somerville allowing their sewage to 
be deposited in this pond at this place, and it 
seems to me it will also be necessary for the 
Board of Health to make some arrangement 
with the Health Committee of Somerville before 
the nuisance can be fully abated. I don't 
know whether the board have considered that or 
not." 

And Alderman Viles replied— 

"When the Committee on Health visited this lo- 
cation last summer, the Board of Health called 
our attention particularly to the sewage which 
Somerville discharged into this canal. They have 
the matter under consideration, and will proba- 
bly notify them to take it out." 

Now, unless there is some other reason given 
than has been given, I see no necessity for peti- 
tioning for an act. If the Board of Health have 
already commenced to take soundings and begun 
the preliminary work to abate the nuisance, it 
seems to me we ought to let them go ahead and 
carry it out. If there is any reason for going to 
the Legislature, which I understand there is, on 
account of tbe obstruction to tidewater — I don't 
know about tbat, I have only heard it stated— and 
if it is so, I think some gentleman here ought to 
understand it and let us know, so that we can vote 
intelligently. ♦ 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5— That is all very correct 
as the matter seemed to stand then. The Eastern 
and Fitchburg railroads seemed to be willing to 
commence. The president of one of the roads 
stated that he had already talked with certain 
men, and that a certain amount of money had 
been set aside to commence the filling. At that 
time they thought ic a sure thing, if the Board of 
Health would condemn it as a nuisance, and it 
would save them from any compensation which 
the Harbor Commissioners said was due for the 
displacement of tide water. But since then it 
was thought that the best thing was to petition 
the Legislature. I have no objection to referring 
it to the Committee on Legislative Matters, if it is 
necessary; but I think the nuisance ought to be 
abated. I think the work can be intrusted to the 
Board of Health, who are very prudent in the 
spending of money. There are two ways — one by 
putting in a bulkhead and covered sewer and 
keeping the water to a certain depth, and the 
other way is to extend the sewer farther down. 
Which way is the better I don't know, and I don't 
know which will be the better for the city to take, 
but there seems to be some necessity for petition- 
ing the Legislature. 

Mr. McGaragle— I think it had better go to the 
Board of Health and let them make a report as 
to the probable cost and the difficulties in the 
way. It appears that there will be a quantity of 
water tilled in at 37% cents a foot, which will be 
worth more than all the land; and as I under- 
stand it this is to get an enabling act for the rail- 
roads to stop tbem from paying for tide water 
displaced. I think we had better go to the Legis- 
lature. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I hope the gentle- 
man from Ward 11 will let it go to the Committee 
on Health. They can consult with the Board of 
Health and probably report next Thursday even- 
ing. And then perhaps it can go to the Commit- 
tee on Legislative Matters to ascertain if it is 
necessary to go to the Legislature. It seems to be 
a subject of a good deal of importance upon 
which all of us have not sufficient information. 
It was not discussed in tbe Board of Aldermen at 
all, and it is no secret that some of the Board of 
Aldermen have expressed the desire that it should 
be discussed, and have expressed a regret that it 
was passed without proper discussion. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19—1 hope the gentle- 
man will withdraws the motion and let it go to 
the Board of Health. They may have the infor- 
mation which we want. If there is a nuisance 



in that neignborhood it ought to be abated. We 
ought to know just what is wanted there, and if 
the Board of Health have the facts they can give 
them to us within a week. Tbe motion of the gen- 
tleman may delay the matter so that we may not 
get the order back in time to send it to the Gen- 
eral Court if it is necessary to go there. I should 
prefer to have it go to the Board of Health. 

Mr. Mowry— I have no objections to its going to 
the Committee on Health or the Board of Health. 
My only desire was to get some information. 

The order was referred to the Joint Committee 
on Health. Sent up. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Orders for furniture to be supplied to the sev- 
eral schoolhouses and the City Hall, and for 
repairs and cleaning to be made on said buildings, 
the police stations, engine houses, and certain 
other public buildings during the present year. 
Passed in concurrence. 

Order for City Engineer to make purchases of 
supplies, instruments and drawing materials, and 
incur other necessary expenses during present 
year, for his department. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for City Surveyor to do the same for his 
department. Passed in concurrence. 

Order for employment of an additional clerk for 
temporary duty in office of Water Registrar at not 
exceeding $284. Passed in concurrence. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING. 

The ordinance to amend the ordinance in rela- 
tion to printing by providing for the appointment 
of a Superintendent was considered under unfin- 
ished business. 

The question was upon its passage. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— Before that is passed 
I should like to ask the reason for making it three 
years. It seems to me this gentleman ought to be 
on a level with the other heads of departments in 
City Hall. I think the Inspector of Buildings is 
the only one who is not elected every year, and 
his term of office is fixed by statute. 1 move to 
amend by inserting "one year" wherever the 
words "three years" occur. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— Tbe original ordinance 
provided for the appointment of the Superin- 
tendent for three years, and in this new ordinance 
we made no change in that respect. The commit- 
tee considered, however, that it was an office 
which it was desirable should not be frequently 
changed, and that it was desirable that a man 
should feel some permanence in the office, 
and not be subject to removal every 
year. It is an office that requires consider- 
able knowledge and considerable time to get 
acquainted with it, and it seems desirable that 
when a man is appointed to that office he should 
hold on to it long enough to be well acquainted 
with it and to be well qualified to perform its du- 
ties, and that there should not be frequent changes 
in the officer. For that reason the committee 
considered that there should not be any change in 
the term of office. 

Mr. McGaragle — The gentleman's reasons are 
very good, and I indorse what he says. But I say 
it is not treating the other beads of departments 
fairly when we put the Superi tent ent therefor 
three years, and subject them to the test of 
reelection every year, I presume the gentleman 
at present in the office has done his duty, but I 
think every man should be treated fairly. Tbey 
are all good heads of departments and superin- 
tendents, and I should like to see them all upon 
the same footing and put them all in office for 
three years, if we can do it. 

Mr. McGaragle's amendment was lost by a 
division— 28 lor, 34 against. The ordinance was 
passed. Sent up. 

THE FIRE BOAT. 

The following was received from the Board of 
Fire Commissioners: 

The order of the 14th instant requesting the 
Board of Fire Commissioners to communicate to 
the City Council their opinion as to the value and 
efficiency of the tire boat, and also requesting the 
reasons for discontinuing the allowance of rations 
to the crew of said boat, came to our hands on the 
21st instant, and the Board beg leave to present 
the following in answer to the same: 

The boat was put into the service of this depart- 
ment Jan. 1, 1873, costing as per auditor's report, 
$31,002.39, since which time to Jan. 1, 1878.it has 
responded to 39 alarms of tire and played 49 times. 
The duty required of it is to answer to any of the 
boxes aloug the water front, being 52 in number 
on the first alarm, and six on the second, and 6 
on the third. During the past year it has played 



32 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



4 and the previous year 5 times. The aver- 
age annual number ot times it has played for the 
period of five years during which it has been in 
service is 9 4-5. Though the loss by fire for the 
past three years has been much lessened, the op- 
portunities for use of the boat and the reasons 
that influenced its addition still exist, but some- 
what diminished by the increase and change in 
the management of the force. The existing water- 
front of the city has on its borders many com- 
bustible localities difficult to be reached by other 
means, where, if a fire were started, the value of 
the boat would be very great, almost in- 
calculable. The board feel that in view 
of the great service it has rendered dur- 
ing its connection with the department, its value 
as an auxiliary is very irreat and that its discon- 
tinuance would be assuming a risk that we could 
not recommend. In answer to the request for the 
reasons for discontinuing the allowance for ra- 
tions, the board beg leave to refer your honorable 
body to a statement herewith appended, made in 
May last to the then chairman of the Committee 
on Fire Department, in response to a similar re- 
quest. This board have reviewed that statement 
and respectfully present it as embodying their 
present views and containing the reasons that 
prompted its action in that matter. 

Very respectfully. 
David Chamberlin, Chairman. 
Office of the 
Board of Fire Commissioners,] 
City Hall, Boston, May 31, 1877. 

Alderman Choate Burn ham, Chairman of Com- 
mittee on Fire Department : Dear Sir— In reply- 
ing to a request to furnish your committee with a 
statement of the changes which have been made 
in the pay and allowances of the "crew" of the 
fire boat.'it is proper that a statement of causes 
that influenced the board to make the changes 
should be iriven. 

It has been the rule of the board since its or- 
ganization to conduct the department with that 
economy consistent with security which will re- 
duce the cost of its maintenance, and where it is 
manitest that a saving can be made, by reduction 
or disuse, they have not hesitated to do it. They 
have been impressed with the importance and 
the necessity of continuing in that course, by the 
public demand and by the action of the City 
Council, in its course of retrenchment and in 
other ways, indicating what might be the result. 
And such being in entire accordance with the 
feelings of this board, they have not only rejoiced 
to see that their acts in that direction are ap- 
proved, but emphatically indorsed. 

When the cominissiouers examined the sub- 
sistence bills of the tire-boat crew on their as- 
suming office, it was found that it cost per annum 
the sum ot 82i63.63, or $309.09 per man, being $25.75 
per month; ttiey telt that that sum was larger 
than it should be, as the raw material only was 
furnished, all other conveniences for cooking, 
etc., being also found by the city: and, as table 
board could be had in a first-class mechanics' 
boarding house for about $16 per month, they de- 
cided a reduction should be made, and an order 
was issued limiting them to the sum of $15 per 
month per man, and the captain has repeated- 
ly stated that they lived well enough on that 
sum. 

On making further investigation, it was ascer- 
tained that elsewhere, in other cities having a 
fire boat in service, New York in particular, by 
personal inspection it was seen that their "boat," 
larger than ours, with more men, was placed on 
the same basis as their permanent companies, 
furnishing their own rations and receiving the 
same pay. It was also found that the steam 
tugs doing their work in our docks and 
around our wharves were not "rationed," 
and in view of the fact that our "boat" was al- 
ways within hail of the wharves, there was no oc- 
casion why they should not come into line on the 
same lav as other permanent members of the de- 
partment. There was still another reason that 
prompted the board to make the change. The 
Committee on Retrenchment in their report say 
that they are of the opinion that the service of 
the tire boat can be dispensed with, thereby sav- 
ing $14,000 per annum. The board did not feel 
that the abandonment of the "boat" at present 
quite a safe thing to do, and though the ex- 
pense of running it is only some $10,967.04 for 
1876-77, they hoped by reducing the cost as they 
have done by some $1820, by this act it would 
have an influence in retaining it in service until 



it became more manifest than at present that its 
use could be safely done away with. 

The action of the board equalizes the condi- 
tions of the permanent force, and though the 
crew of the boat have nearly twice the amount of 
"leaves of absence" as the other permanent men, 
it is offset, perhaps, by the limit of their quarters. 
Trusting that the reasons above named will be 
sufficient for justifying the action of the board, 
I remain, very truly, 

Your obedient servant, 

David Chamberlin, 
Chairman. 
Referred, on motion of Mr. McGaragle of Ward 
8, to the joint special committee on the consoli- 
dation of the fire and police boats and Harbor 
Master's Department. Sent up. 

WATER PIPES. 

A communication was received from the 
Water Board, stating that they are about 
to contract for water pipes for a second 
line of force mains for the Mystic Water 
Works, under authority given them by the City 
Council, Oct. 2, 1877, asking authority to contract 
at the same time for 1650 tons of pipes ana special 
castings needed in the Cochituate Department 
during the next financial year, at an estimated 
cost of $5000, to be paid for after the 1st of May 
next from the appropriation to be made for the 
Cochituate Water Works for the financial year 
1878-9. 

Referred, on motion of Mr. Sampson of Ward 
17, to the Committee on Water. Sent up. 

HEREFORD-STREET EXTENSION. 

A communication was received from the Street 
Commissioners submitting a resolve and order for 
the extension of Hereford street, from Common- 
wealth avenue to Boylston street, for the concur- 
rence of the City Council, taking land as follows: 
Owner's Name. Square Feet. 

Caleb H. Warner and Charles F. Smith 15.150 

'• 1,800 

H. D. Hvde and F. W. Andrews, trustees 800 

G. T. W. Braman, H. D. Hyde and F. W. Andrews, 

trustees 14 ,000 

The adjudged cost is $33,337.50. 

Referred, on motion of Mr. Perham of Ward 
23, to the Committee ou Streets. Sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19— Remonstrance of 
Gardner Warren against the nomination of 
Charles Harris for Superintendent of Streets. 
Referred, on motion of Mr. Sampson of Ward 17, 
to the committee on the nomination of Said 
officer. Sent up. 

By Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19— Petition of A. D. 
Williams and others, that the nuisance in and 
about the Roxbury Canal be abated at once. Re- 
ferred to the Committee ou Improved Sewerage. 
Sent up. 

By Mr. Pearl of Ward 1— Petition of Benjamin 
H. Stimpson, for payment of stock and labor fur- 
nished the steamer Henry Morrison. Referred to 
the Committee on Claims. Sent up. 

By Mr. Kendricken of Ward 20 — Petition of Mrs. 
Ann Markins, to be compensated for personal in- 
juries received by a fall on the sidewalk. Referred 
to the Committee on Claims. Seut up. 

By Mr. Lovering of Ward 4— Petition of Francis 
Childs and ochers for the appointment of Charles 
Fisk as superintendent ot bathhouse at Maiden 
Bridge. Referred to the Committee on Bathing. 
Sent up. 

REPORTS OF NOMINATING COMMITTEES. 

Reports of joint special committees to nomi- 
nate city officers were submitted as follows: 

By Mr. Quigley of Ward 20— For City Engineer, 
Joseph P. Davis. 

By Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— For Citv Solicitor, 
John P. Healy. 

By Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19— For City Archi- 
tect, George A. Clough. 

By Mr. Brown of Ward 23 — For Superintendent 
of Public Buildings, James C. Tucker. 

By Mr. Perham of Ward 23— For Superintendent 
of Streets, Charles Harris. 

By Mr. Pearl of Ward 1— For Superintendent ot 
Sewers, William H. Bradley. 

By Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— For City Messen- 
ger, Alvah H. Peters. 

By Mr. Cox of Ward 14— For Suoerintendent of 
Public Lands, Robert W. Hall. 

By Mr. Thorndike of Ward 2— For City Survey- 
or, Thomas W. Davis. 

By Mr. Pierce of Ward 24— For Commissioner of 



JANUARY 31, 1878 



33 



Cedar Grove Cemetery (for five years), William 
Pope. 

By Mr. Kidney of Ward 6— For Clerk of Com- 
mittees—William H. Lee. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 11 submitted a report 
from the Joint Standing Committee on Assessors' 
Department, in conformity with the ordinance, 
nominating as Assessors Thomas Hills, Benja- 
min Cushing, Benjamin F. Palmer, Edward F. 
Robinson and Horace Smith. 

By Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— For Water 
Registrar, William F. Davis. 

By Mr. Sibley of Ward 5— For City Registrar, 
Nicholas A. Apollonio. 

The reports were severally accepted. Sent up. 

The nominations were laid over. 

HEALTH APPROPRIATION. 

Mr. Sampson ot Ward 17 submitted a report 
from the Finance Committee on request of the 
Board of Health for a transfer of the balance of 
the appropriation for Fever Hospital to the gen- 
eral appropriation for Quarantine Department, 
recommending the passage of an order— That the 
Auditor of Accounts be and he is hereby author- 
ized to transfer the sum of $359.17 from the ap- 
propriation for Fever Hospital, Gallop's Island, 
to that for Quarantine Department. The order 
was passed to a second reading. 

LABOR FOR RESIDENT DESTITUTE CITIZENS. 

Mr. Roach of Ward 7 submitted the following: 

The joint special committee appointed to con- 
sider the expediency of providing such labor as 
maybe advantageously done at this season of the 
year for resident citizens destitute and unable to 
obtain employment, and to whom was referred the 
petition of M. J. Savage and 1300 others, asking 
that immediate measures of relief be adopted, 
having considered the subject, beg leave to sub- 
mit the following report. The committee gave a 
public hearing, at wbich the petitioners, through 
their representatives, were present and submitted 
testimony to prove the distress existing among 
the unemployed in this city. No practicable 
measures for relief were presented. 

The petitioners urged that thepublic works, for 
which large appropriations have been made, 
should be immediately commenced, in order to 
afford employment to those needing it. 

It was evident that the majority of the petition- 
ers who were present at the hearing were unin- 
formed as to the status of the public works which 
they wished to have immediately commenced, and 
that they were not aware that either the terms of 
the statutes authorizing the work, or the condi- 
tions attached to the orders making the appro- 
priations, were such as to necessitate the settle- 
ment of many preliminaries before any part of 
the work could be actually begun; while in some 
cases the season of the year was unpropitious for 
the execution of any work except at great loss to 
the city. The committee believed that a true 
statement of the facts from authoritative sources 
was due the petitioners, and therefore addressed 
a communication to the heads of departments 
having charge of works which will necessitate 
the employment of laborers, and present the fol- 
lowing abstracts of the replies: 

The chairman of the Committee on the Im- 
provement of Stony Brook writes as follows: 

"In reply to your communication inquiring 
whether any part of the work of improving Stony 
Brook, which will afford employment to laborers, 
can be immediately commenced, and whether any 
action on the part of the City Council will hasten 
the beginning of the work, I regret to say that no 
work can be done upon the brook until the pro- 
visions of the statute which authorizes the city to 
make the improvement are complied with. 

"For the purpose of improving Stony Brook the 
city is authorized to take or purchase land on 
either side thereof, and it is, therefore, necessary, 
in the first place, that accurate plans of the land 
bordering on the brook should be prepared. 

"After the plans are prepared it will be neces- 
sary to negotiate with the owners of estates for 
the purchase of such land as maybe required, and 
for the right to make such alterations upon their 
respective premises as maybe needed to carry out 
the improvement. 

"In cases where the land cannot be purchased 
it will be necessary to take it, according to the 
form prescribed by the statute. 

"These preliminary steps must be taken with 
care, otherwise the city will be liable to be in- 
volved iu vexatious and expensive litigation. 
The Committee on the Improvement of Stony 
Brook are progressing in the matter as fast as 



possible, and hope to have the preliminary ar- 
rangements completed at an early day. Until 
then no action on the part of the City Council will 
hasten matters. 

"It is perhaps unnecessary for me to say that the 
committee fully sympathize with the efforts that 
are being made to provide labor for the unem- 
ployed, and will use every means in their power 
to forward the work under their charge, in order 
that laborers may be employed thereon. 
Very respectfully yours, 

J. S. Robinson, Chairman." 

In reply to the questions of the committee as to 
the expediency of proceeding with the work of 
constructing the improved system of sewerage, 
the acting City Engineer writes as follows: 

"Referring to your communication of the 26th 
inst., in regard to furnishing employment upon 
the improved sewerage work at this season, I re- 
ply that almost the only kind of work contem- 
plated is the building of sewers and other struc- 
tures of brick, stone and concrete masonry, and 
that it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to 
lay such masonry during freezing weather, so that 
I could not be responsible for its durability or ef- 
ficiency if built at this time. By tunnelling, the 
sewer could be built during the winter, but unfor- 
tunately very little of the line is suitable for this 
method of construction. A certain amount of 
filling of roadways is also connected with the 
scheme, but this is iniended to be done after the 
sewer shall have been completed, since it would 
add largely to its cost to excavate through 
the additional filling. There is a short sec- 
tion on Ninth street, west of H street, which will 
have to be filled above high water before the 
sewer can be built. This, so far as we are con- 
cerned, might be done at once, but as the street is 
not yet laid out, it would have to be a subject for 
negotiation and agreement with the Street Com- 
missioners and others. 

Yours respectfully, 

Henry M. Wightman, 
Acting City Engineer." 

The communication sent to the Street Commis- 
sioners requested information particularly in re- 
lation to the prospect of an early commencement 
of the work of widening Commercial street. It 
should ba understood that the order, passed by 
the last City Council, appropriating $500,000 for 
this work, contained the following conditions: 

"Provided that said street be widened mainly 
on the water side, and to a width not to exceed 
eighty feet; and provided further, that if the esti- 
mate of the Street Commissioners for the expense 
of widening, grading and repaying said street 
shall exceed said sum of $500,000, no part of said 
sum shall be expended until the abutters, cor- 
porations and persons interested in said street 
widening shall agree to contribute such sums of 
money as will, with said appropriation of $500,000, 
be sufficient to cover said expense." 

The Street Commissioners replied as follows: 

"The construction of streets already laid out by 
the Street Commissioners, which might furnish 
work at this time, is in the hands of the Commit- 
tee on Paving, under direction of the Board of 
Aldermen. The Commissioners have ordered a 
survey of Commercial street, which is not likely 
to be finished before the first of April. If it is 
found possible to widen the street under the con- 
ditions of the order making the appropriation for 
the purpose, it is notprobaDle that much could 
be accomplished towards it until the first of July, 
and then time must be given abutters to remove 
buildings, etc. The Commissioners have no other 
streets to lay out than can be depended upon to 
furnish work during the present winter mouths. 

Respectfully, Newton Talbot, 

Chairman." 

The following was received from the Superin- 
tendent of Sewers: 

"In answer to your communication of this date 
asking if there is any work in this department 
which can be immediately begun, I would reply 
that there is no work which can at present be 
done in this department. Respectfully your 
obedient servant, W. H. Bradley, 

Superintendent Sewers." 

The Superintendent of Streets sent the follow- 
ing reuly : 

"I ain in receipt of your communication of Jan. 
25, asking whether there is any work in the Pav- 
ing Department upon which laborers can 
be employed, which can be advantageously done 
at this season of the year, and also whether any 
action on the p&rt of the Council will hasten the 
beginning of any such work. In answer thereto 



34 



COMMON COUNCIL 



I have the honor to report tbat there are on the 
rolls of the department at the present time 573 
laborers employed on half time; that the force is 
sufficient to perform all the work required of the 
department during the present season, and is as 
large as the state of the appropriation will war- 
rant. 

"If the City Council should see tit to provide the 
means, a limited number of men, say three hun- 
dred, might be employed on ledges in Roxbury, 
Dorchester, West Roxbury and Brighton, in quar- 
rying stone for use next season. If this should be 
done, it must be borne in mind that it would be 
anticipating the wants of the department, and 
would deprive an equal number of men next 
spring of the amount of work which wonld be 
done now. Also, tbat this work cannot be done 
as advantageously now as in the spring, when the 
days will be longer, the ground free from frost, 
and the weather not so variable and uncertain as 
at this season. Respectfully yours, 

Charles Harris, 
Superintendent of Streets." 

From the foregoing it will be seen that there 
are no public works for which appropriations 
have been made, and which can properly be com- 
menced and carried on at the present time. Your 
committee, therefore, believe, and so report, that 
it is inexpedient and impossible to increase the 
number of laborers already in the city's employ, 
or to commence any of the large public improve- 
ments for which special appropriations have been 
made. 

In coming to this conclusion your committee 
have been governed by the" principle that 
it is always inexpedient and unjust to 
distribute charity in the form of work; 
that is, to pay for services which do not 
return to the city a fair equivalent for the sum 
expended, in the form of completed work. The 
Statutes of the State make it the duty of the city 
to afford relief to such poor and indigent persons 
as are residents of the city, but where the policy 
of emploving men to do unnecessary or useless 
work is adopted it is impossible to go into ques- 
tions of settlement, and so the unemployed of the 
country towns and smaller cities flock in to over- 
crowd the labor market, and thus the measure 
which the laborer is told is passed in his favor 
eventually works him great harm. Such a policy 
is clearly unjust to the taxpayer, whose money is 
taken without his consent for" a purpose not con- 
templated by law, and unjust to the working classes 
who are sure to be injured by it. In referring to 
the working classes your committee mean to in- 
clude not only the persons working for the city, 
but also the very much greater number of persons 
in private employ who see their places taken or 
their wages lowered by pressure from the crowd 
thus attracted to the city. Your committee, how- 
ever, are fully aware of the tact that suffering 
does exist in" the city at the present time, and 
they are in favor of beginning any public work 
which can be advantageously carried on at this 
season ; not only for the reason that relief will 
thereby be given to the persons out of 
employ, but because it is good policy to take ad- 
vantage of the cheap labor which is now offered, 
to do work which must, in any case, be done soon. 
It appears that the city owns a bank on Heath 
street which at present is but little used, as the 
soil is not suitable lor making streets; but it is 
suitable for rilling, and from its situation in rela- 
tion to the entrance from Huntington and Brook 
line avenues to the Back Bay park it s believed 
that filling can be furnished in carts for said en- 
trances at lower rates than it can be delivered by 
railroad. Therefore, and after consultation with 
the Joint Special Committee on Parks and the 
Park Commissioners, your committee recommend 
the passage of the following orders. 

Thomas J. Whidden. 
Curtis Guild. 
Richard Roach. 
Robert M. THOMPSON. 
Robert Cox. 

Ordered, That the Park Commissioners be and 
they hereby are authorized to expend the sum of 
$25,000 in tilling, grading, surveying and laying 
out the Back Bay park, so-called, and the Com- 
mittee on Finance are requested to provide the 
means. 

Ordered, That the Park Commissioners be and 
they hereby are authorized to take and use the 
soil and gravel from the lot of land owned by the 
city situated on Tremont and Heath streets, for 
the purpose of tilling the Back Bay park. 

The order was ordered to a second reading, and 



Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 moved a suspension of 
the rule. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 explained that the 
order to provide the means would have to go tc 
the Finance Committee, and at his suggestion the 
motion to suspend the rules was withdrawn by 
Air. Spenceley, who said he only desired to see the 
work commenced as soon as possible, as there are 
so many men in need of it. 

On motion of .Mr. Thompson, the first order was 
referred to the Finance Committee, and the 
second order was passed. 

Sent up. 

claims. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 submitted a report 
from the Committee on Claims, that the petition 
of Charles F. Shimmin to be refunded one-half 
the amount of a tax bill, properly belongs to the 
Committee on Assessors' Department, and recom- 
mending its reference to them. Accepted and 
referred accordingly. Sent up. 

TWENTY-SECOND OF FEBRUARY. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 offered an order- 
That his Honor the Mayor be and he is hereby re- 
quested to cause the flags to be displayed and the 
bells to be rung at different parts of the city on 
the 22d day of February next, in commemoration 
of the anniversary of the birth of George Wash- 
ington: the expense attending the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for Incidental Ex- 
penses. Ordered to a second reading. 

BILL TO BE APPROVED. 

Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11 offered an order— That 
the Auditor of Accounts be and he is hereby au- 
thorized to allow for payment the bill of P. H. 
Rogers, amounting to $8.50, chargeable to sewers, 
provided it is approved in the usual manner. Or- 
dered to a second reading. 

"WARDROOM FOR WARD ONE. 

Mr. Shepard of Ward 1 offered an order— That 
the Joint Committee on Public Buildings consid- 
er and report upon the expediency of the City 
Council furnishing a suitable wardroom in Ward 
1. Read twice and passed. Sent up. 
public baths. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 moved a reconsidera- 
tion of the vote whereby the order for the Com- 
mittee on Ordinances to consider the expediency 
of putting the Bathing Department in charge of 
the Board of Health and of reporting an ordi- 
nance therefor was referred to the Committee on 
Bathing. 

At Mr. Sampson's request, the President read 
the order. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— Gentlemen will see 
that the order is to consider the expediency of 
reporting an ordinance. The Committee on Bath- 
ing do not report ordinances. If we were going 
to change the Sewer Department to the care of 
the Superintendent of Streets we might just as 
well refer the consideration of the subject to the 
Superintendent of Sewers as to refer a proposed 
change in the management of the Bathing De- 
partment to th Committee on Bathing. 

Mr. Pearl of Ward 1— It seems to me that the 
Committee on Bathing would be the proper par- 
ties to consider the expediency of consolidating 
that department with the Health Department. 
They are more familiar with the department thau 
the Ordinance Committee are. I have no partic- 
ular objection to Its going to the Committee on 
Ordinances, but it seems to me the Bathing Com- 
mittee is the one to consider the expediency of 
the change. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9— The proper time for 
the Committee on Bathing to act is when the 
Committee on Ordinances report. If the Council 
are not satisfied with the ordinance reported they 
can refer it to the Committee on Bathing. The 
order is for the Committee on Ordinances to do a 
certain thing, and as a matter of parliamentary 
courtesy it should be referred to them. The Bath- 
ing Committee should not do what is intended to 
be done by the Committee on Ordinances. Their 
only action would be to report that the order 
ought or ought not to be referred to the Commit- 
tee on Ordinances. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 certainly hope the 
reference will not be reconsidered. This contem- 
plates a radical change in a very important de- 
partment, and the gentleman from Ward 9 admits 
it by saying that if the Council is not satisfied 
with the report they can refer it to the Committee 
on Bathing, which is virtually saying what the 
report wilfbe, that they will frame an ordinance 



JANUARY 31 



1878 



35 



putting this department under the Board of 
Health. It seems to me if there is any one who 
knows who should know about this matter it 
is the Committee on Bathing. I think they 
should first consider the matter and report back ; 
and then the Committee on Ordinances can frame 
an ordinance in accordance with their report. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I think there has 
been an unfortunate statement of what it is de- 
sired to accomplish. In the first place, it is to 
consider the expediency of doing this, which 
should properly go to the Committee on Bathing. 
I hope it will be reconsidered, and, if so, I shall 
move to strike out "Committee on Ordinances" and 
insert "Committee on Bathing." That will leave it 
where it should go, and if they report that it is 
expedient to do so it will go to the Committee on 
Ordinances to draw a proper ordinance. 

The reconsideration prevailed. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 — I now move to refer 
it to the Committee on Ordinances. I don't agree 
with the gentleman from Ward 10. The Commit- 
tee on Ordinances are to ascertain and report 
whether it is desirable to make the change or 
not; and as I said, to refer it to the Bathing Com- 
mittee would be the same as referring a proposed 
change in the management of the Sewer Depart 
ment to the Superintendent of Sewers. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— The first question 
is to consider the expediency of placing the bath 
houses in charge of the Board of Health; and it 
strikes me that if there is any committee to whom 
that should be referred to get knowledge upon 
that subject it is the Committee on Bathing. The 
Committee on Ordinances are expected to know 
the proper legal phraseology of an ordinance, but 
the question of the desirability of doing that thing 
should properly be left either to the Committee 
on Bathing or the Board of Health. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 — It seems to be desirable 
that some committee should consider whether the 
charge of the bathing houses should be trans- 
ferred from the Committee on Bathing to the 
Board of Health, and it seems tome it would not 
be a legal way of disposing of it to refer it to 
either on« of those departments. It seems to me 
it should be referred to an impartial committee, 
which the Committee on Ordinances should be 
supposed to be. I happen to be on that commit 
tee, and have no desire to have it referred to 
them; but it seems to be a question that should 
be referred to some impartial committee, to be 
decided fairly. It would be rather an unusual 
way of settling a question to refer it to interested 
parties — to ask the Bathing: Committee it they 
think their powers ought not to be taken away 
from them. We may be pretty sure what the an- 
swer will be, judging from the ordinary course of 
committees who are jealous of parting with their 
powers. Committees ordinarily are inclined to 
hold on to such powers as they have, and as this 
is a question of the expediency of taking away 
powers from that committee, I am pretty sure we 
will have but one answer. I should think the 
Council would wish to have the question fairly 
considered on both sides. 

Mr. Pearl of Ward 1 — Here is a department run 
by a committee for a number of years, and, as I 
can show by the facts, very economically. They 
have reduced the expenses from $36,000, year by 
year, to $24,000; and as they are supposed to be 
honorable gentlemen, they will act according to 
their best judgment, as they know more about 
bath houses than any other committee in this 
City Government. I move to strike out "Commit- 
tee on Ordinances" and insert "Committee on 
Bathing." 

The President — That will not be in order. 

Mr. Danforth of Ward 10— I move that it be re- 
ferred to a joint special committee of three mem- 
bers on the part of the Council. 

The President— That is not in order. 

Mr. Day of Ward 4 inquired if it would be in or-' 
der to move to indefinitely postpone, and the Pres- 
ident replied that it would not. 

Mr. Brawley of Ward 19—1 would like to inquire 
of the gentleman who offered this order what ad- 
vantage is to be gained by changing this depart- 
ment from the Committee on Bathing to the 
Board of Health, if any? 

Mr. Crocker— I believe the order was introduced 
in the other branch, and the benefits to be de- 
rived, or the injury to be done by the change, is 
what it is desirable for this committee to investi- 
gate. 

Mr. Pearl of Ward 1— A member of the Board 
of Aldermen who was a member of the Bathing 
Committee last year, and is not this year, gave 



me to understand that had he understood the 
order before it passed the Board he should have 
objected to it. 

On motion of Mr. Pearl the matter was laid on 
the table. 

PROPOSED TABULAR CLASSIFICATION OF VOTERS. 

Mr. Rust of Ward 18 offered an order— That the 
Assessors furnish the City Council a series of 
tables of persons who voted at the last State elec- 
tion, showing in each Ward the number and per- 
centage of the following-named classes: Persons 
who paid a poll tax only, persons who paid a tax 
on a total of $1000, on a total of $2000, on three, 
four, five, ten, fifteen and $20,000, and in classes of 
each subsequent $10,000, together with any similar 
statistics that said department may deem it judi- 
cious to add. 

Mr. Rust— In connection with this order I would 
state that the voting lists used at the last elec- 
tion, obtained and prepared by the Republican 
City Committee, are now in my possession and 
can be used for this purpose by the Assessors at 
very little expense. At this time, when we hear 
so much about woman suffrage, I think we should 
know who the voters are. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 — I cannot see my way 
clear to vote for this. I don't know what it is go- 
ing to amount to; but the free ballot is the dear- 
est right the poor man has in this country, ana I 
shall never by my vote do anything to restrict 
that right. Unless the gentleman gives better 
reasons for the order I shall move to indefinitely 
postpone it. It is a matter that properly belongs 
to the Registrars of Voters. 

Mr. Barry of Ward 22 — The gentleman says he 
has the statistics, and undoubtedly he has pe- 
rused them. I don't want any information of 
that kind, and I do not think it is a proper sub- 
ject to come before the Council. The gentleman 
and his committee have undoubtedly investigated 
it long ago. I move that the order be indefinitely 
postponed. 

Mr. Rust — I did not state that I had the statis- 
tics, but that I had the voting lists which could be 
used for this purpose. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9— I hope it will not be 
indefinitely postponed. The order calls for the 
preparation of some statistics that will be of great 
interest and very useful to citizens of this city; 
they can only be obtained from the books of the 
Assessors' Department, and they are the only city 
officers who can furnish them. As a member of 
the City Government and a citizen of Boston I 
would be very glad to have them, and have no 
doubt scientific persons interested in the study of 
what is the best government in cities would find 
the facts of very great interest. There has been 
a strong petition presented to the Legislature 
that woman suffrage in a modified form should be 
introduced, and this is undoubtedly a time when 
there will be more or less attempts to move or 
change, or in some form alter or modify, the laws 
regarding voting, and any change made in this 
direction, unless made in the light of facts, would 
be dangerous. There is a discontent in the pres- 
ent state of affairs. My friend showed the 
order to me, and it at once commended 
itself to me as providing for obtaining facts 
of very great value. I would almost ask the gen- 
tleman to withdraw the motion, for I cannot con- 
ceive why any object to it, as the information 
it calls for does not affect any one class. It will 
show whether the men who come out and vote 
pay the taxes. It is one great cause of complaint, 
that men of property do not take an interest in 
city affairs and are the stay-at-homes. These sta- 
tistics will show whether the great body of voters 
are small tax payers, or whether they are men 
who have a property interest in good gov- 
ernment. The information will be useful to stu- 
dents of social science and to the members of the 
Legislature who made our laws. I hope the gen- 
tleman will withdraw the motion. 

Mr. McGaragle— I hope he will not withdraw 
the motion, and if he does I will renew it. I don't 
propose to. get any information that will take 
away the right of any person to vote. The gentle- 
man from Avard 18 says he has the voting lists; 
he can get the information if he wants it. He 
can take the lists and go to the Assessors office, 
and spend from now to doomsday if it is required. 
I don't believe in furnishing such information to 
parties who say we want a new charter to provide 
that a man must pay tax on so much money be- 
fore he can vote, and I will not vote for such an 
order. 

Mr. Thompson— The gentleman begins his ques- 



36 



CO MM. ON COUNCIL. 



tion by assuming bis own answer. I think be 
makes a mistake in saying tbat tbese statistics 
will tend to take away the right of the poll-tax 
payer to vote. It is an open question, ana the 
statistics will contribute the answer. II he is so 
positive it will bear against the side which he 
professes to represent 

Mr. McGaragle— I did not represent any side. 

Mr. Thompson— The use of the word "side" was 
unfortunate. The gentleman proclaimed that he 
should n't vote to take away any rights of the 
poor man. I do not want to see any rights taken 
away, but I want to see those questions discussed 
on theii broadest merits and upon the fullest in- 
vestigation, and any man here who votes to pre- 
vent gettintr tbat information does not do his 
duty to all the citizens of Boston. 

Mr. Brawley of Ward 19— It seems to me tbat 
the Mayor and the gentleman who has just taken 
his seat differ very materially on this subject. 
The Mayor has given this subject a good deal of 
attention, and stated in his inaugural address — ' 

"While I am fully sensible of the defects in our 
present system of municipal administration, I 
cannot help regarding with distrust any scheme 
for curing them by a radical change of the New 
England system under which we have grown up, 
and which, notwithstanding its defects, has thus 
far produced better results than any other system 
which has ueen tried in this country- I cannot do 
more at this time than indicate very briefly, and 
I fear very imperfectly, the reasons I have for 
doubting the propriety or the expediency of at- 
tempting to raise the standard of municipal gov- 
ernment by a limitation of the suffrage. Such 
legislation "would be contrary to the traditions, 
the education and the practice of our people." 

Now there is no question about it, the order 
that has been presented here tonight tends to- 
wards a change in the voting or in the registra- 
tion of voters. It may not do so directly, but it 
certainly does indirectly, judging from the re- 
marks I have heard from gent'einen present, and 
from those who seem to favor the idea. The fact 
is apparent that there is a desire to know who it 
is that casts their votes in the city of Boston — 
whether it is the heavy taxpayers' or not. It 
does n't make a particle of difference who 
cast their votes at the last State election. The 
Mayor s&id that— 

"The election which placed in our hands the 
administration of the City Government during 
the present year was one of more than ordinary 
interest and importance. It has shown in an un- 
mistakable manner the determination of the citi- 
zens to prevent the establishment in our muni- 
cipal afiairs of what is known as the 'spoils 
system.' " 

Now, the citizens of Boston, without regard to 
the amount of taxes they pay, saw the impor- 
tance of placing the present Government in the 
City Hall, and seeing that importance, they went 
and cast their votes accordingly, without regard 
to the amount of taxes they pay. They were given 
to understand that the interests of the city of 
Boston required a change, and such a change, 
took place. I don't see that the information to be 
obtained by this order will be of any earthly use, 
but merely a matter of ornament. 

Mr. Barry — This order is not a pertinent subject 
for this body to take into consideration. As a cit- 
izen of Boston, I believe we all ought to investi- 
gate into the matter of elections; but if gentle- 
men want this information, there is the Social 
Science Association for investigating into this 
question. Let the gentleman take his list and get 
the information and present it in a paper to 
the association, and let him discuss outside 
as a citizen the best method of conducting the 
city of Boston; but I say it is not a pertinent sub- 
ject to be brought here in the City Council. We 
were elected to the Government tor the present 
time and to act upon matters as we find them. 

Mr. Rust— The motives attributed to me were 
farthest from my thought* when I put this order 
in. I thought there were other members who de- 
Sired this information as well as myself, ami I did 
it for what I thought to be for the best good. 



On motion of Mr. Barry, the yeas and nays were 
ordered on the question of indefinite postpone- 
ment. 

Mr. Thompson— In order that my position may 
not oe misrepresented, I wish t> add one word 
more. The gentleman from Ward 19 [Mr. Braw- 
ley] stated that my position was in opposition to 
that of the Mayor in his inaugural address, and 
he read extracts from that address; but I fail to 
find in what the Mayor said any oppo- 
sition to what I said. He said the Mayor 
was against any chauge. I did not say I favored 
any. I merely said that there was a petition be- 
fore the Legislature and that action was being 
taken elsewhere looking to a change in the law. 

Mr. Harry called Mr. Thompson to order, raising 
the point that he was wandering from the sub- 
ject. 

The President said he thought Mr. Thompson 
was in order. 

Mr. Thompson— It seemed to me that while this 
important discussion is tauing place it is the duty 
of every citizen and municipal body to establish 
facts bearing upon this investigation. We can 
aid in this investigation, and I hope it will be 
done. 

Mr. Spenceley— 1 can't tell what the object was 
iu offering this order, but it seems to me no one 
can object to it. I have paid a pretty large tax, 
and I may pay only a poll tax, but I shall go to 
the ballot box with just the same pride. I cannot 
see anything in the order that will prevent any- 
thing of that kind. The only question that strikes 
me is whether it will cost a great deal. 

Mr. Barry— I am as desirous as any gentleman 
of having the information, and I believe Boston 
ought to be governed honestly. But I do not be- 
lieve tbis'is a pertinent question to come before 
the City Council. 

Mr. Kosnosky of Ward 16—1 favor indefinite 
postponement because the order is expensive. 
The gentlemen desiring the information can get 
it by wards from the Assessors. 

Mr. Smith of Ward 9—1 hope the order will not 
be indefinitely postponed. I should like the infor- 
mation myself, and my only objection is that 
it might be very expensive. I can see 
wherein it will be beneficial to members of the 
Council and citizens generally. I am not afraid 
of my rights as a Massachusetts taxpayer. I 
believe there never will be any consider- 
able number of men in Massachusetts who desire 
to curtail the rights of any man, and I ami 
one of those who are frightened by the cry of 
wolf. If I only pay $2 poll tax I am as proud of 
my right as is the man who pays taxes on his 
millions." I have paid a poll tax only, and some- 
times a little more, for the last thirty- five 
years in Boston, and never yet saw the day tbat 
my own vote contributed to disfranchise me. I 
hope the order will pass. Let us have the infor- 
mation if it is worth the expense of getting it. 

Mr. Rust— The chairman of the Assessors told 
me it would possibly cost $500. 

The motion to indefinitely postpone was lost- 
yeas 31, nays 34: 

Yras— .Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, N. 
Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Coe, Colby, Cox, 
Denny, Devlin, Drynan, Femald, Flynn, Ken- 
dricken, Kidney, McGahey, McGaragle, Mc- 
Geough, Mullane, Mullen, O'Connor, Pearl, Per- 
ham, Roach, Rosnosky, Santry, J. Taylor, Thorn- 
dike, Whicber, \\ ilsou— 30. 

Nays— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Crocker, 
Danforth, Day, Ham, Hill, Hollis, Howland, Lov- 
ering, McDonald, Mowry, Nason, Pierce, Plimp- 
ton, J. B. Richardsou, M. W. Richardson, Roberts, 
Rust, E. H. Sampson, O. H. Sampson, H. N. Saw- 
yer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, Smith, Spenceley, J. F. 
Taylor, Thompson, Toppan, Ward, Wolcott, Wool- 
ley, Wyman— 34. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Doherty, Hib- 
bard, Kelley, I, a u ten, Sibley, Webster— 6. 

Mr. Barry moved to lay on the table. Carried 
by a division— 32 tor, 30 against. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Spenceley. 



• 1 . 



37 



HOARD OF AJ^UErtMEN 



CITY OF BOS TON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 4, 1878. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., Alder- 
man Stebbins presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Thirty-two traverse jurors were drawn for the 
January teim of the Superior Court, Second Ses- 
sion. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Superintendent of Lamps— George H. Allen. 
Confirmed. 

Coal Weighers- James P. Stewart, Charles H. 
Moseiey. Coutiruied. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Report and order to take land at Old Harbor 
Point for purposes of a pumping station online 
of the great sewer. (City Doc. No. 17.) Passed. 
Sent down. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on St wera. Otis Norcross et 
al., that the city would accept the sewer in the 
passageway between Commonwealth avenue and 
Marlborough street. 

To the Committee on Annoiies. Company A, 
First Battalion Infantry, lor an allowance for 
furniture of armory. 

To the Special Committee to dominate Inspec- 
tors of Lighter*. William H. Coleman, for ap- 
pointment as a weigher, etc.. of lighters. 

To the Committee on Public Lands. Charles 
Heinhardt, that the bond ot estate 78 Middlesex 
street be cancelled and a new one issued. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Boxrd. Petitions for leave to occupy stables by 
Lorin Clark, Adams street, new wooden, four 
UOWM and one horse; Thomas Donnelly, Ashland 
street, new wooden, one hor.*e; P. H. Henderson, 
Orchard street, new w<>< den, two horses; Henry 
Dudley, Elm street, rear of Gieen, new brick, 
twenty horses. 

To the Committee on Licenses. Richard Fitz- 

?;erald, dealer in wood and coal, for leave to stand 
lis wheelbairow or hand cait in fiontof 101 West 
Hrookline street, during business hours. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS FROM THE COMMON 
COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Repi it referring to Committee on the Assesors' 
Department the petition ot C. F. Shiiumin et al., 
trustees, for abatement of tax. Accepted and 
relerred in concurrence. 

Order for Committee on Public Buildings to re- 
port on the expediency of providing a new ward- 
ro >tn for Ward 1. Passed in concurrence. 

Reference to Board of Health ot the order re- 
lating to the tilling of the Mill Pond and flats. 
Concurred. 

Order to provide $284, for services of a temnora- 
ry clerk in the Water Registrar's Department. 
Passed iu concurrence. 

Request of Boston Water Board for authority to 
contract for additional pipes tor Cochitiiate 
wo'ks. Referred to the Committee on Water in 
concurrence. 

Resolve and order from Board of Street Com- 
missioners to extend Hereford street to Common- 
wealth avenue; estimated expense, §33,337 50. Re- 
lerred to Committee on Streets in concurrence. 

Report of Committee on Unemployed Labor, 
with an order for Park Commissioners to ex- 
pend $25,000 for filling the Back Bay Park. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Finance; also an order 
appended to said report authorizing the taking i»f 
soil from the eity land on Heath street lor that 
purpose came up passed. Concurred. 

Communication from the Board of Fire < oro- 
missioners in response to the inquiry as f> the 
efficiency of the tire boat, and the reasons for the 
discontinuance of rations to the crew. Referred 
to the Special Committee on Subject of Fi it- 
Boat, etc., in concurrence. 

PETITIONS FOR IMPROVING THE BACK-BAY PARK. 

A petition came up from S. C. Cobb and others, 
in favor of the city abating a nuisance on Back 
Bay by commencing at once to improve the pro- 
posed park, and the question was on lefereuceto 
the Special Committee on Public Parks in concur- 
rence. 



At the request of Alderman Guild, the Chair- 
man read the petition. 

Alderman Guild — 1 call attention to the petition 
for the purpose of having it fully understood that 
the demand for the layiug out of this park and 
for the abatement of this nuisance is made by 
those who will have to pay the larger portion of 
the cost. When any project is brought forward 
in the City Council for the establishment of 
public parks, or the improvement of those 
already laid out, we frequently hear it urged 
that such a measure is antagonistic to the 
best interest of the city of Boston. Now, 
sir, I have the honor of presenting a number of 
petitions for this improvement, which have been 
handed to me today, and I think that if the names 
ot the petitioners were placed before the public 
they would be found to be those Ol a majority of 
the heaviest taxpayers In the city of Boston who 
want this nuisance abated and this land laid out 
as a park and improved as soon as possible; and I 
also want to call the attention ot those who read 
and hear this to the fact that the performance of 
it will give employment to the worthy poor ol the 
city ol Boston. Therefore it is imperative, when 
the proper time comes, for us to act upon this 
petition. As I said, the petitions come from pat- 
ties who will be largely called upon to pay the ex- 
pense of it. 1 have one inmv hand which leads off 
with Henry P. Kidder, D. N.'Skillings, E. A. White 
and Benjamin K. Stevens and other very large 
owners of property in the city of Bo-ton, who 
pray lor the same action as is ai-ked lor in the 
petition which vou have read. It is one of the 
means bv which employment may be given to 
worthy poor citizens of Boston. 

The petiiion which came up was referred to the 
Special Committee on Parks in concurrence, and 
Alderman Guild presented the following, which 
were referred tot he same committee and sentdown: 

D.A.Dunbar, L. B. Hiscock, A. J. Wilkinson, 
Joel Goldthwait, and eight others; Jacob Ed- 
wards, Barney Corey, Tower, Giodings & Co., and 
eighteen others; William Gray. Francis Jaques, 
C. H. Warner, G. A. Soinerby, Thomas Dana, and 
one bundled and thirty others; and H. P. Kidder, 
Benjamin F. Stevens, John C. Ropes, Albeit 
Bowker, and eighteen others, in aid of petition 
of S. C. Cobl) and others, lor immediate develop- 
ment ot Back Bay Park and avenues. 

ELECTIONS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Reports of nominating committees came up, 
with, nominations of sundry city officers, as lol- 
tollows: 

As-essors— Thomas Hdls, Benjamin dishing, 
Benjamin F. Palmer, Edward P. Robinson and 
Horace Smith. 

Clerk oi Committees— William H. Lee. 

City Architect— George a. (lough. 

Commissioner on Cedar Grove Cemetery— Wil- 
liam Pope. 

City Ei gineer— Joseph P. Davi->. 

City Surveyor — Thomas W. Davis, 

City Registrar— N. A. Auollouio. 

City Solicitor -John 1' Heaiy. 

City Messenger — Alvah H. Peters. 

Supeiintendent of Public Buildings— James C. 
Tucker. 

Superintendent of Sewers— William H. Bradley. 

Superintendent of Streets— Chailes Harris. 

Superintendent ot Public Lands— Robert W. 
Hall. 

Water Registrar— William F. I)a\i«. 

The reporis were severally accepted in concur- 
rence, and on motion or Alderman Viles the 
Board proceeded to the elections, with the follow- 
ing resiilrs: 

City Engineer, t'ommittee— Aldermen Viles, 
Slade. Joseph 1'. Davis had eleven votes, ami 
was declared elected. Sent. down. 

City Surveyor. Committee— Aldermen Faunce, 
Guild. Thomas W. Da/is had eleven voles, anil 
was declared elected. Sent down. 

City Registrar. Aldermen Harris, McLean. N. 
A. Apodonio, had ten votes, ihe whole number 
casr. and was declared elected. Sent down. 

City Solicitor. Committee — Aldermen Slade, 
YVhiddeu. Johr P. Healy had ten votes, the wh- le 
number, and was declared elected. Sent down. 

Commissioner on Cedar Grove CemHti y. Com- 
mittee—Aldermen Viles, McLean. William Pope 
had eleveu votes, and was declared elected. '3ent 
down. 

Clerk of I'ommiltees. Committee— Aldermen 
Robinson, Whiton. William H. Lee had ten votes 
and was declared elected. Sent down. 



FEBRUAKY 4 , 1878 



38 



City Architect. Committee — Aldermen Harris, 
Hayden. George A. Clough had eleven votes and 
was declared elected. Sent down. 

City Messenger. Committee— Aldermen Harris, 
Viles. Alvah H. Peters bad eleven votes, and was 
declared elected. Sent down. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings. Commit- 
tee — Aldermen Slade, Faunce. James C. Tucker 
bad eleven votes, and was declared elected. Sent 
down. 

^Water Registrar. Committee— Aldermen Whid- 
den, McLean. William F. Davis had eleven votes, 
and was declared elected. Sent down. 

Superintendent of Sewers. Committee — Alder- 
men Robinson, Hayden. William H. Bradley had 
eleven votes, and was declared elected. Sent 
down. 

Superintendent of Streets. The election of Su- 
perintendent of Streets was laid over one week 
on motion of Alderman Whidden. 

Superintendent of Public Lands. Committee- 
Aldermen Whiton, Guild. Kobert W. Hall had 
eleven votes and was declared elected. Sent 
down. 

Assessors. Committee— Aldermen Hayden, Rob- 
inson. 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary for a choice 6 

Thomas Hills -. . 10 

Benjamin Oushing 11 

Benjamin F. Palmer 11 

Edward F. Robinson.; 11 

Joshua S. Duncklee 8 

Horace Smith 4 

And Messrs. Hills, Cushing, Palmer, Robinson and 
Duncklee were declared elected. Sent down. 

MYSTIC VALLEY RAILROAD. 

The petition of Mystic Valley Railroad Corpora- 
tion for approval of their route to and their ter- 
minus in this city was considered on an order of 
notice for a hearing. No one appeared for or 
against the petition, and it was laid on the table. 

BOND APPROVED. 

The bond of Charles D. Annable, constable, be- 
ing presented duly certified, was approved by the 
Board. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

The report of the Overseers of the Poor for 
quarter ending Jan. 31, 1878, was received. Re- 
ceipts $34,309.94 ; balance on hand, $6210.93. Sent 
down. 

PETITION FOR STEAM ENGINE. 

A petition was received from Moulton & Good- 
win, for leave to locate and use a steam engine 
and boiler at 119-123 Water .street, and an order of 
notice was passed for a hearing thereon on Mon- 
day, Feb. 25, at four o'clock P. M. No one ap- 
peared to object, and the petition was referred to 
Committee on Steam Engines. 

FRANKLIN FUND. 

Alderman Whiton submitted a report from the 
committee appointed to examine the accounts of 
S. F. McCleary, treasurer of the Franklin Fund— 
That they find said accounts have been correctly 
kept, the" interest duly collected, and the securi- 
ties, which were examined by the committee, 
were found in proper condition. It appears, from 
this examination, that the condition of the fund 
at this date is as follows: 

Amount of fund Feb. 1, 1877 $218,800.58 

Interest accrued and collected 10,925.82 

#229,726.40 
The above sum is invested as follows: 
Deposits in Massachusetts Hospital Life 

office 8227,722.05 

Deposits in Provident Institution for Sav- 
ings 122.91 

Deposits in Suffolk Savings Bank 211.26 

Value of nine bonds for loans 1,670.00 

Cash... .18 

8229,726.40 

Accepted. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Guild submitted reports from the 
Committee on Licenses, as follows: 

Minors' Applications Granted — Twenty-four 
newsboys. 

Amusement Licenses Granted— John Drynan, 
to give an athletic exhibition at Beethoven Hall, 
Feb. 20, subject to the control of the police; War- 
ren-street Chapel, to give a festival at Music Hall, 
Feb. 22. 

Carriage License Granted— Warren S. Brown, 
819 Washington street, after 9 P. M. 



Wagon License Granted — Jacob F. Emerson, 
127 Fulton street. 

Victualler's License Refused— J. F. Ferdinand, 
53-55 Kingston street. 

Auctioneers Licensed— David C. Sisson, 3 Motte 
street; Joseph E. Clark, 588 Broadway. 

Hack License Refused — Henry L. Hawes, 77 
Court street. 

Severally accepted. 

MASKED BALLS. 

Alderman Faunce offered an order — That the 
Committee on Licenses be requested to appear 
before the appropriate legislative committee and 
oppose the proposed modification of chapter 88 
section 77 of the General Statutes, by which pub- 
lic masked balls are prohibited. Passed. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Alderman Hayden submitted a report from the 
Joint Committee on Assessors' Department, who 
were req uested to consider the expediency of 
abolishing the office of Second Assistant Assessor, 
that they deem it inexpedient to abolish said 
office. Accepted. Sent down. 

Subsequently Alderman Faunce offered an or- 
der—That the Committee on Ordinances be re- 
quested to consider the expediency of so amend- 
ing the ordinance in relation to the assessment 
and collection of taxes as to provicfe that the Sec- 
ond Assistant Assessors shall be appointed by the 
Principal Assessors. Passed. Sent down. 

TREES REMOVED. 

Alderman Guild submitted reports from the 
Committee on Common on the paft of the Board- 
That leave be granted to William Blakeuiore and 
Elizabeth Carter to remove certain trees near 
their premises at their own expense, severally 
under the direction of the Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Grounds. Severally accepted. 

ARMY AND NAYY MEMORIAL. 

Alderman Guild submitted a report from the 
Committee on Printing that it is inexpedient to 
print a second edition of the Army and Navy 
Memorial volume. Accepted. Sent down. 

POLICE COMMISSION. 

Alderman Guild submitted the following: 

The Joint Standing Committee on Ordinances, 
to whom was referred so much of the Mayor's 
address as relates to placing the administration of 
police and the issuing: of licenses in a board of 
police commissioners, having considered the sub- 
ject beg leave to submit the following report: 
The committee fully agree with the views of his 
Honor the iVlayor in regard to the desirability of a 
change in the management of the Police Depart- 
ment, and believe that the plan suggested or pla- 
cing the administration of police, and the duty in 
regard to the issuing of licenses, both for the sale 
of liquor and for other purposes, in charge 
of a board of commissioners, to be the best 
and most economical method of improv- 
ing the discipline of the department and of se- 
curing increased efficiency in the enforcement of 
the laws and ordinances. As the administration 
of police is by statute vested exclusively with the 
Mayor and Aldermen, it will be necessary to ob- 
tain legislative authority before any change can 
be made, and the committee submit herewith an 
order for obtaining the necessary authority and 
respectfully recommend the passage of the same. 
For the committee, 

Curtis Guild, Chairman. 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court now in session 
for the passage of an act authorizing the City 
Council to establish by ordinance a Board of Po- 
lice Commissioners, and confer upon said board 
the authority to exercise all or any of the powers 
in relation to the administration of police and the 
issuing of licenses now vested by statute or or- 
dinances in the City Council or in either branch 
thereof. 

The order was read once and laid over. 

Later in the session, Alderman Guild moved 
that the order take its second reading, as the time 
for petitioning the Legislature is short, and per- 
haps it is well to get the matter along as speedily 
as possible. 

Alderman Viles— It is a very important order, 
and 1 trust we shall not pass it to a second read- 
ing tonight. I wish to consider it, and want more 
time to do so than I have had. I should like to 
have it lie. over at least another week. 

Alderman Guild— The Alderman Will see that it 
is merely asking for authority to establish the 
commission. The authority might not be exer- 



39 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



cised by the City Council, if obtained. The time 
is rather short, and it might be bandied about in 
the lower branch until it is too late. That is the 
only reason I ask for the second reading. 

Alderman Viles— It is quite a new departure, 
and I trust we shall consider it a little longer. I 
would like to consult the other members of the 
Committee on Police and the members of the 
Board, and I hope it will lie over a week at least. 

The Board refused to give the order a second 
reading at this session— 2 for, 5 against— and the 
order went over. 

SOUTH B08TOK RAILROAD. 

Alderman Whidden submitted a report from 
the Committee on Paving, with an order of notice 
for a hearing on Monday, Feb. 25, at four o'clock 
P. M.,on the petition of the South Boston Rail- 
road, for leave to run their cars over Dover- 
street Bridge, and up and down Washington 
street to Milk street, etc. Order passed. 

PERMITS FOR ST A ISLES. 

Alderman Viles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Health on the part of the Board in 
favor of granting permits to occupy stables by 
John Farquhars & Sons, rear20 and 22 East street; 
Mrs. Elizabeth J. Mc In tire, Corbett street ; .1. A. 
Riedell & Co., Newbury street, corner Hereford 
street. Seve^Uly accepted. 

PROJECTING SIGNS. 

Alderman Viles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Police as follows: Of leave to 
withdraw on the petition of Allen. Shapleigh & 
Co., for leave to project a business sign in iront 
of 85-7 Court street, and that leave be granted 
Charles E. Guild to project a druggist's mortar at 
at the corner of Berkeley and Tremont streets. 
Severally accepted. 

MARKET. 

Alderman Slade submitted a report from the 
Committee on Market, recommending the ap- 
proval of the transfer of the lease of Stall 13, New 
Faneuil Hall .Market, by S. C. Tryon to ,1. P. and 
J. O. Squire. Accepted. 

CONTRACTS INVOLVING EMPLOYMENT OF LAUOR- 
EBS. 

Aldermau "Whidden offered an order— That the 
Committee on Ordinances consider the expediency 
of repealing the ordinance passed Dec. 28, 1876, 
entitled "An ordinance in relation to contracts 
involving the employment of laborers.'" 

Alderman Whidden— I offer that order for the 
interest not only of the city or Boston, as I think, 
but for the interest of the laboring classes— those 
whom, it would seem, it was intended should be 
benefited by the passage of this ordinance. From 
its results, as it has been applied, it seems to lead 
to confusion. No good results from it, and it pro- 
duces dissatisfaction, with no final adjustment of 
the question. "When the ordinance was discussed 
at the time of its adoption, 1 felt opposed to it, 
and held the same opinion which I hold now after 
knowing something of its practical operation. 
The question is left with the committee to adopt 
this form of contract, or protection, as it 
is called; but, in my opinion, it needs no 
protection whatever, and it only produces annoy- 
ance where it has been practically in force. A 
contractor in the Improved Sewerage Department 
in South Boston owed laborers something like 
$800, and their certification to the City Clerk 
keeps the money back, and they cannot get it, 
the City Treasurer cannot pay it out, and the con- 
tractor cannot draw it. In consultation with the 
City Solicitor a few days ago, he said that in his 
opinion it could not be effective, and the same 
process would have to be gone through with as 
though it were trusteed by legal process, to obtain 
the money, and there is no other way to do so ex- 
cept to obtain an order from the individual, which 
can be obtained from the party as easily and bet- 
ter than by this form, and thus relieve the city 
from the annoyance of a provision which pro- 
duces no good. The repeal of the ordinance will 
relieve the city trom the position of acting as 
guardian, to a certain extent, of this class of 
laborers, and also leaves the city from the encum- 
brance of having a poor class of mechanics foisted 
upon it in the execution of contracts. I don't 
know in what respect the ordinance can benefit 
any one who adopts the means it provides of hold- 
ing the money, lean see no benefit whatever; I 
can only see a cause of trouble, annoyance, deten- 
tion, and a long lapse of time before the settling 
of the matter. Therefore, I can see only trouble 
to the city and to those whom it is intended to 



benefit, and I have introduced this order for its 
repeal. 

Alderman McLean— I gather from the drift of 
the remarks of the gentleman who has just taken 
his seat, that if this ordinance is rescinded it will 
be the means of getting a better and more sub- 
stantial class of contractors to do city work. Is 
that the point? 

Alderman Whidden— That is secondary; the 
first point is to relieve the city and those whom it 
is intended to benefit from the trouble and an- 
noyances of a provision which produces no good. 

Aldermau Guild— If I understand the Alderman, 
he said there were more efficient means of attain- 
ing the eDtl desired. If I understand it. this de- 
duction was intended to be made in case the con- 
tractor ran away, and that some of the money 
should be kept back to pay the laborers, in case 
he does not have anything* on hand to pay them. 
The Alderman says that some other method can 
be adopted. We certainly want some method 
adopted if it can be, and 1 hope he will gratify the 
Committee on Ordinances by suggesting one. 

Alderman Whidden — I did' not intend to imply 
that I had any other method. I think other ruech- 
ods might be applied to this subject which would 
work much more efficiently ; but I do not feel dis- 
posed to advance my ideas in regard to them. It 
does not give the laboring men the protection it 
was intended to do, by its advocates, and I think 
it is a source of detention and dissatisfaction. 
Another thing, 1 object very strongly to the city 
assuming to protect laborers in the employ of 
contractors for the city. I don't think that duty 
belongs to the city, and I don't think the city 
should assume any such care as the guardianship 
over them. As 1 said before, in doing that it as- 
sumes the care and protection of a class of men 
who come in and take contracts who are not qual- 
ified to do so, whose standing is not sufficient to 
guarantee the performance of the contract in any 
other way, and therefore the city has assumed 
this liability. That is the principal objection I 
have to it. 

Alderman McLean— It seems to me that it is 
evident that some protection is needed for the 
laboring men who are working for irresponsible 
contractors. Evidently the gentleman is not one 
of that class of contractors, and there are many 
others who do not need watching. Nevertheless 
it seems to me that something is necessary, but 
whether this ordinance does its work is a ques- 
tion, of course. The gentleman has looked into 
it more than I have, but I think it is necessary 
that the city should protect the laborers, or should 
require the contractors to give sufficient bonds to 
guarantee the work to be done and the laborers 
to be paid. It seems to me that it this ordinance 
isTepealed, it should be a part ol every contract 
that sufficient bonds should be given to 
make up for any deficiency in the payment of 
the men, who ought to have a lien upon 
the work. 1 would like to have such 
provision if we can, although 1 am not 
prepared to offer anytning; but I did feel at the 
time this was passed that it was in the interest of 
the laboring men; and 1 think that if it does not 
do its work we ought to have something else. 
Now there is no reason at all why the city should 
be pursued, if you please, by shysters in the busi- 
ness, and thereby drive out men who could do the 
work at a fair price and pay the laborers fair pay ; 
and it seems to me that in order to protect the 
better class of contractors who do the city work, 
some bonds should be required from the irre- 
sponsible contractors who made it necessary 
to make some such ordinance as this to protect 
the laborers. While I am not prepared to say 
what should be done, I think it is very evident 
that something should be done. The Alderman 
says he has consulted the City Solicitor, who says 
it is no relief to the laborer, and an an- 
noyance to the city. If that is the ease, it 
is only a stumbling block in the way. I think 
we had better not rescind this at present, but see 
if something better cannot be done in its place, 
and do something to protect the laborers who go 
to work for the city, as they believe, and, as was 
stated in the committee room the other day, work 
and work for months, and finally are turned off 
without a dollar, and they come to the city and 
ask if something cannot be done to keep them 
trom starving. Now, while I accept the explana- 
tion given ot the working of this ordinance, and 
if the gentleman shows that the city's interest 
suffers, and that the laboring men receive no ben- 
efit, then I shall be in favor of rescinding it; but I 
think that something ought to take its place and 



FEBRUARY 4,, 1878. 



40 



provide for what was intended to be provided for 
at the time it was passed. „ , 

Alderman Whidden— I doii't^hihk it, is advisa- 
ble to go into an argument oh this subject. If it 
is referred to the Committee on Ordinances, .un- 
doubtedly they will give it careful attention, and 
if, in their judgment, it seems best, they will pro- 
pose something in the place of it. When the gen- 
tleman made his statement first, it was a good 
deal more than that the city should protect the 
laborers from irresponsible contractors. Now I 
say that the city should protect itself from irre- 
sponsible contractors; it should not employ such 
men upon its work. This ordinance is a means of 
bringing in such men, and on thatgrouud I favor 
its repeal. It is well known that irresponsible 
contractors can come to City Hall and get 
contracts when responsible men know they can- 
not get contracts. The repeal of the or- 
dinance is not only, in the interest of the city, but 
of the laboring nien. I know that some laborers 
have sold their claims for seventy cents on the 
dollar, and that prospectively they were good for 
nothing. I have letters asking me to use my in- 
fluence in committee to protect these men; but 
the committee can do nothing. The laborers have 
filed their claims with the City Clerk, the money 
is retained and they cannot get it. That is the 
process. The City Solicitor says they can trustee 
it, but their counsel tells me they cannot, and 
that makes it still worse. I think that all this 
management in attempting to protect the labor- 
ing men leads lo wrong. I think it is an 
encouragement to make contracts with irre- 
sponsible parties and brings in a class of people 
here that should not get contracts from the 
city. The bonds will have no effect; almost every- 
body can give a bond, and so long as he has the 
bond he will get the contract, if he is the lowest 
man who bids. The city and laborers suffer, and 
there is no protection either to the city or to the 
laboring men. If it goes to the Committee on 
Ordinances I think they can propose something 
in its stead, although I am individually opposed 
to the city assuming any such protection. 

Alderman Guild — I think the Committee on Or- 
dinances would like to have the subject pretty thor- 
oughly ventilated. I remember when this subject 
was brought up and discussed. It was designed to 
protect the laborers from dishonest contractors. 
There were dishonest men who obtained con- 
tracts, and gave the fairest bonds for the per- 
formance of them ; and not only that, but there 
were men who intended to do right, and failed; 
they collected the money up to the last month and 
paid the men up to that time, and on the last 
month they came down to City Hall and collected 
their money and the laborers lost their last 
month's pay. It is difficult to convince those la- 
boring men that they are not working for the city 
of Boston. The Alderman says this money is 
locked up and cannot be trusteed. It is informa- 
tion to me that it cannot be trusteed by the labor- 
er. If he proves his claim, it becomes his money. 

Alderman McLean — I understand that this mat- 
ter stands in this way : The man who is in fault is 
a sub-contractor; that the contractor let a part of 
the work to the sub-contractor, of whom the city 
has no knowledge, and in consequence of that the 
money is tied up and cannot be paid over. If I 
am not right the chairman will correct me; — per- 
haps he knows more about it. I understand that 
the original contractor cannot draw the money 
on account ol this ordinance being in existence. 
In this phase of the case it may be necessary that 
this matter should be adjusted and this ordinance 
repealed; nevertheless, while I am up, for the 
benefit of the Committee on Ordinances — the 
chairman says the committee would like to 
have this matter discussed here — I would say that 
if this matter does come up before them, or any 
other matter of like import, I hope he will 
see to it that the city shall be debarred from giv- 
ing a contract to irresponsible parties, notwith- 
standing the Alderman says that anybody can 
give a bond. We don't intend to take straw bail, 
and though, of course, the gentleman's word is a. 
bond, and there are many others like him, but I 
think he should give a bond to perform any con- 
tract which he makes. I believe it is a proper 
thing for the Committee on Ordinances to con- 
sider, and if the Board will pardon me I will say 
that no one deprecates the letting out of contracts 
to irresponsible parties more than myself. I am 
not in the line of business by which the city can 
be cheated by me, and there is nothing in my line 
by which I could serve the city, and I am able to 
talk independently; but I do hope that 



such responsible gentlemen as the gentle- 
man on my right will serye the city by 
taking contracts, but that they will be 
required to give a good and sufficient bond for 
the performance of any contract they may take. 
In my experience I have known men with not a 
dollar to lose come in and take away a contract 
from me; in some cases I was glad of it, and in 
others I should have been glad to do the work. I 
hope the bond will be required. 

Alderman Slade— If I understand the case the 
person who took the contract gave sufficient 
bonds. There is no trouble about the work, for 
his bondsmen may do the work. The trouble is 
that he underlet a" portion of the work, and the 
money left here for the laborers has been trusteed 
by some person whom he owes. The sub-contract- 
or says that if the contractor can s;et the money he 
can get his money and pay his men. The trouble is 
it was trusteed before it could be got bold of. I 
don't know what sort of an ordinance can be 
made to meet such cases. I wish there was a 
statute law that the city could not be trusteed 
for anything. Here is a case where a party has 
given sufficient bonds, and satisfactory bonds, 
too, to fulfil his portion of the work, and his 
money being trusteed by outside parties, it can- 
not be paid to him, and he cannot pay the sub- 
contractor, who cannot pay his men. If one of 
them coultt get hold "of the money the men 
could be paid. 

Alderman Whidden — I don't understand that 
this amount has been trusteed. 

Alderman Slade— 1 am sure it has. 

Alderman Whidden— As I understand it, this 
amount remains for the purpose for which it was 
intended, ana as I understand it, cannot be trus- 
teed, and the counsel for the laborers tells me it 
cannot, and that that is not the process to obtain it, 
although Mr. Healy says it can, in his opinion, 
and I should say it was correct. The information 
I have got from all these parties is that that 
amount remains to be paid over to those men 
whenever it can be obtained to do so. 

Alderman Slade— I think the Alderman will find 
that that money has been trusteed. 

The order was passed. Sent down. 

ROXBURY CANAL. 

On motion of Alderman Harris the order lor the 
Committee on Improved Sewerage to consider the 
subject of abating the nuisance in the Roxbury 
Canal, and to inquire if any lurther legislation is 
required, was taken from the table and passed in 
concurrence. 

On motion of Alderman Harris the petition of 
David W. Cheever and others, for the abatement 
of the Roxbury Canal rcuisauce, was taken from 
the table and referred to the Committee on Im- 
proved Sewerage in concurrence. 

THE RATIONS OF THE FIRE-BOAT CREW. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, the order to 
restore the rations of the crew of the fire boat 
was taken from the table and referred to the 
Committee on Fire Department in concurrence. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of 
Public Buildings (City Doc. 18) was received. 

The expenditures for the year were as follows: 

On public buildings, $97,681. 38; on county build- 
ings, $32,098.61; on schoolhouses, $104,376.04; for 
extraordinary matters, such as building new 
schoolhouses, etc., $372,000. The income from 
rents, etc., has been $128,766. 

During the past year the following buildings 
have been completed: 

Grammar schoolhouse for the Dorchester 

Everett District #42,863. 45 

Marcella-street Truant and Vagrant House. 37,282.91 
Charles Sumner Grammar Scheolhouse, 
West Roxbury, including furnishing, also 

heating and ventilating apparatus 50,552.07 

Engine House of AVood ant*. Harvard ave- 
nue, Brighton, cost of land and building.. 8,182.72 
During the past summer, by an order of the 
City Council, a contract was entered into 
with Messrs. Frederic Tudor & Co., to in- 
troduce their ventilating apparatus into 
City Hall in order to improve the ventila- 
tion of the Council Chamber. The work 

has cost, completed 3,000.00 

Plans are nearly perfected, and work will be 
commenced in the early spring upon a school- 
house in Brighton, in the Allston District, upon 
land owned by the city. Means for the construc- 
tion of this building were provided by the City 
Council of last year. The building in' many re- 
spects will resemble the Weston-street school- 
house. 



41 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



It is believed that no new buildings for school 
purposes will be required this year, excepting 
uossibly a primary building in the Charlestown 
T)istrict, upon the Folk-street lot. 

The following is a comparative statement of the 
number of county buildings, public buildings and 
schoolhouses, together with the number of feet 
of land covered by the same, between the years 
1864 and 1878. 




M 








© 


05 


IC 


M 


to 


~J 


a 


C.T 


CS 


« 


CD 


CO 










- 


© 


CO 


tc 


w 


© 


to 


cc 


*■ 


© 


-J 


-4 



6CO.O 

W re » 

x p, ~ 




The above will show a total increase in fourteen 
years of 186 buildings, and of land equivalent to 
about eighty-two acres. 

The estimated valuation of the several county, 
public buildings and schoolhouses, including fur- 
niture, land, etc., is as follows: 

County S2.000.00* 

Public Buildings 6,534,364 

Schoolhouses 7,996,500 

Total $16,530,864 

Sent down. 

PERMIT FOR STEAM ENGINE. 

Alderman McLean submitted a report from the 
Committee on Steam Engines in favor of granting 
a permit to B. F. Sturtevant to locate aud use a 
steam engine in rear of Green street, Ward 23. 
Accepted. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Harris. 



42 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY 7, 1878. 



Regular meeting at 7V 2 o'clock, P. M., Benjamin 
Pope. President, in the chair. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS FROM TI1E BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN. 

Petitions were received in concurrence. 

Reports of Overseers of Poor and Superintend- 
ent of Public Buildings placed on tile. 

Report, inexpedient to print another edition of 
Army and Navy .Monument Memorial. Accepted 
in concurrence. 

Report, inexpedient to abolish the office of 
Second Assistant Assessor. Accepted in concur- 
rence. 

Report and order to take land at Old Harbor 
Point for purposes of a pumping station on line of 
the great sewer. (City Doc. No. 17.) Order read 
twice and passed in concurrence. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

An order came down to the Committee on 
Ordinances to consider the expediency of pro- 
viding by ordinance tint the Second Assistant 
Assessors shall be appointed by the Principal 
-ors. 

The order was read a second time and the ques- 
tion was upon its passage. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2—1 fail to see what im- 
provement it would be to place this matter in the 
hands of the Principal Assessors. A joint com- 
mittee of eight members of the City Council is 
quite as competent to make that selection as the 
Hoard of Principal Assessors, which consists 
of five members. The committee have an 
opportunity to hear from the several can- 
didates through the representatives in the Coun- 
cil from the different wards, and they have a much 
better chance to investigate the character of the 
men than the Assessors have. Then another 
thing. I think it is giving undue power to the 
heads Of departments, who now have quite enough 
to do for the services for which the; receive 
liberal salaries. We have reason to believe— at 
least I have— that the office of Second Assistant 
Assessor would fall into the bauds of favor- 
ites of the principal Assessors; while the present 
system gives a fair chance tor the representa- 
tives ot the people to elect the best men. 
Good men are put forward as a general thing, 
and as a general thing the members of the Coun- 
cil indorse the petition ot those who get the 
nomination; and I think no member of this City 
Council would indorse any man unless lie is com- 
petent and worthy. I trust this order will not 
prevail, as I see no benefit to be derived from the 
change. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— This is not a question 
of passing or changing the ordinance, but of 
having a committee consider the expediency of it 
and making a report. I hope we shall act, so far 
as letting the committee consider it and report 
as to their opinion alier making the examina- 
tion. I have no decided opinions upon the 
ject myself, but 1 know there are strong- 
reasons why it mav be supposed we might get 
better Second A ssistant Assessors than by the 
present Bystem. The present method don't 
work very well; it is rather a matter ol dividing it 
up into different wards, and. practically, we get a 
great many very poor second assistant assessors 
under the prf sent system. I believe that it is ad- 
mitted on all hands that under the present system 
we get very poor officers, and if there is any way 
we can improve upon it, it seems to me we ought 
to try to do it, and it is oesirabie that a committee 
should consider and report upon the question. 

Mr. Burke— The gentleman says that by the 
present system we get very poor Second Assistant 
Assessors. Perhaps we don't get the very best 
men, and perhaps in many other positions we 
don't get the best men that we can have; but I 
would like some gentleman to point out to me by 
what means w r e are going to get better men by 
placing the appointment in the hands of the Prin- 
cipal Assessors. They have not the sources of 
iniormation that the members of the City Coun- 
cil have, because, as I said before, some 
member of this Council recommends a man to a 
committee and indorses his nomination, and 1 



take it for granted that no member ot the Council 
would recommend a man unless he is tit for the 
position. Besides that, this is a step toward the 
centralization of government, which ought to be 
defeated in any government. It has already 
worked mischief in this City Government and in 
other cities where it has been adopted. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24— [believe with the gen- 
tleman from Ward 9 that this is only to consider 
the expediency, and I hope it will pass. The gen- 
tleman from Ward 2 seems to think that we will 
get better men for Second Assistant Assessors by 
the present system. I don't know how it is else- 
where, and can only speak for my own ward. I 
come in here to vote for names brought in by a com- 
mittee, and I don't know whether they express the 
wish of the wards or not. In the case of our own 
ward, we had a man thrust upon us last year to 
whom seven-eighths ot the ward were opposed, 
and it may possibly have been owing to misrepre- 
sentation to the committee who nominated him, 
1 hope* the order will pass. 

The order was passed in concurrence. 

CONTRACTS INVOLVING THE EMPLOYMENT OB 

LABOR. 

An order came down for the Committee on Or- 
dinances to consider the expediency of repealing 
the ordinance concerning contracts involving the 
employment of laborers. 

The order was read twice and put upon its pas- 
sage. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2— As some of the Commit- 
tee on Ordinances are present, this is another 
question I should like some information upon be- 
fore voting upon it. When the City Council took 
action in this matter, it was for the protection of 
laboring men in this city. If this ordinance is 
to be repealed to carry out the views 
of members of the other Board, I shall 
vote against it; but if there is a chance 
to amend it and make it more perfect and protect 
the working men I shall vote for it. The question 
raised in the Board was that the city shouldn't 
take any steps to protect individuals. I think it 
should, for in protecting individuals it protects 
itself. Very often we give contracts to parties 
living out of the city and after receiving 
large sums they take their last month's payment 
out of the city and leave the men unpaid ; and un- 
less the laborers have some such security as this 
ordinance offers, the city suffers by her citizens 
losing money. I trust the committee will trv to 
make the city more secure by protecting the labor- 
ing men of the city. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— As a member of the 
Com'mittee on Ordinances which reported this 
ordinance, I do uot believe there is any occasion 
for repealing it. I believe it has worked well, and 
the only reason for repealing it at the pres- 
ent time is because certain contractors, who 
have n't paid their laborers, can't get their 
money. It ie because the ordinance is 
doing just what it was intended to 
do, that certain contractors who find that they 
cannot get their money when their laborers have 
not been paid, want to get the ordinance out of 
the way. Still, if anybody wants the Committee 
on Ordinances to consider the expediency of re- 
pealing it, I do not object. I don't propose to 
vote either in favor ol or against its being 
referred to the Committee on Ordinances; 
I am indifferent upon the subject, and if anybody 
wants it referred to the committee I am willing 
to have them consider it. But I wish to say that 
I have watched the workings of the ordinance, 
and have no reason to believe that it has worked 
otherwise than for good. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17—1 would like to have 
the gentleman from Ward 9 tell how it benefits 
the laborer. This proposition to repeal the ordi- 
nance arises from the tact that it has been tried 
in the department of improved sewerage; a claim 
has been filed against one of your own con- 
tractors, the money has been withheld under 
this ordinance, and the laborers cannot get it. 
If the gemleinan will show how those men can 
get their money and the laborers their pay, he 
will do the committee a great service. Neither 
the City Solicitor nor the counsel tor the laborers 
can tell how to get the money for the laborers. 

Mr. Crocker— I don't know that the Council 
wants any discussion at the present time, but per- 
haps I can state the points at present. This or- 
dinance provides that if the contractor does not 
pay his laborers, the city may refuse to pay Aim, 
and it provides that a provision to that effect 
shall be put into every contract. So far as 



PE B R IT A R, Y 7 , 18 7 8 



43 



I can learn, this ordinance has worked well 
in a great many cases, and lias been the 
means of securing tbe pay of the laborers, 
they having given notice that they haven't 
got their money, and the contractors hav- 
ing been compelled to settle with them be- 
fore getting their money from the city. It 
turns out that one contractor employed a sub- 
contractor, who did n't pay his laborers, though 
he got his pay from the contractor. The con- 
tractor did n't look out to see that the sub-con- 
tractor paid his men, and now he finds that he 
cannot get his money from the city. To be sure, 
the city cannot pay the laborers, the money can- 
not come out of the city treasury until the con- 
tractor comes to some settlement with the 
laborers. But in this case, even if the ordinance 
should not be entirely effectual, and 
should give the laborers only a part of their 
money, it will make contractors in the future see 
that their sub-contractors pay the laborers before 
the sub-contractors are paid. It will be a warn- 
ing to all contractors that„if the men employed by 
their sub-contractors don't get their pay, they 
wont get their money from the city. If the City 
Council stands firm and says the rule shall be car- 
ried out, that the contractor shall not get 
his money unless the laborers are paid, then the 
contractor will look out carefully to see that the 
laborers are paid, and then the laborers 
will get their money in due order. The 
repeal of this ordinance will put the 
thing back in the condition it was before, when 
the laborers were cheated out of their money; 
when the assignee of the contractor came to the 
city authorities and said, "The work is done, and 
we'want the money; the laborers are not paid, 
but we can't help it, and it is none of our busi- 
ness, and they may whistle for their money." 
That is what it was intended to stop, and I believe 
it has worked to that end. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— The gentleman from 
Ward 9 virtually admits that it has failed when 
put to the test. If he can show any way for the 
men to get the money I should be glad to have 
him do so. We want the laborers to get their 
money. I would ask if that money cannot be 
trusteed in any form? 

Mr. Crocker— The money cannot be trusteed as 
the money of the contractor, if it could be, it 
would have been long ago. As to admitting 
its failure, I utterly deny that it has failed, be- 
cause it has worked well in all cases, and in 
this particular case it has done just what 
it was intended to do, and all that we 
can make any ordinance do. Because this 
money cannot be put into the hands of 
the laborer is no evidence that the ordi- 
nance has failed; and if it can beamend- 
ed, to accomplish that, I shall be glad to 
have it. It may be possible to have it improved. 
The ordinance has done all it can do. It was in- 
tended to stop the money from going into the 
hands of the contractor before the laborers were 
paid. It was not intended to pay the money into 
the hands of the laborers, because that would in- 
volve too much labor and detail ; but it was in- 
tended to make the contractor look out for the 
laborers. It has been entirely effectual in most 
cases, and in this one the screw is on pretty 
tight, and if the city holds on firmly, the laborers 
will get their money. 

Mr. Sampson— This proposition does not come 
from tlie contractor; the contractor knew nothing 
about it. 

Mr. Danforth of Ward 10— I understand that 
this ordinance has worked perfectly except in this 
one case, in which the contractor employed a sub- 
contractor, and the money was trusteed for an- 
other debt; consequently the laborers have no 
claim upon that money. If the contractor had 
hired the laborers, it would have worked well in 
this case ; and it would have done so if the money 
had n't been trusteed on an outside case. I think 
the ordinance might be amended. 

Mr. Mowryof Ward 11— It seems to me that this 
order, like its predecessor, is merely to consider 
the expediency of repealing this ordinance. I see 
no harm in letting it go to the committee, and at 
any rate I am in favor of that. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19— It seems to me that 
rather than thinking that the ordinance has 
failed, the original contractor has made a mis- 
take. It has worked very well in many cases, and 
I don't know but it will in this case. The con- 
tractor let certain work to the sub-contractors, 
who, instead of paying the men, put the money 
into their pockets and went away. It seems to 



me the contractors ought to have looked out and 
see that the men got their money. We ought to 
protect those men, and I believe this ordi- 
nance is protecting those laborers today. The 
contractor ought to know the sub-contractors 
and see that they pay the men, and if 
we hold on to the money it seems to me the men 
will be paid. I have a petition here which I will 
present by and by, asking that something be done 
for these very men, though I don't know what 
can be done for them. They have worked hard 
and have no money now for their labor; and if we 
hold en to the money, by and by the contractor 
will settle with them, and get a release so as to 
draw the rest of the money. 

Mr. Crocker— I merely wish to repeat what I 
said before, that I don't object to this being re- 
ferred to the committee. I should n't have said 
anything about it unless requested by the gen- 
tleman from Ward 2. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I agree with the 
evident object of this ordinance, if it is possible 
to assist the poor laboring men who are employed 
upon city work in getting their pay. But in every 
case where an occasion has arisen for the use of 
this ordinance it has failed, though perhaps the 
peculiar features of it have not been brought 
before the public so prominently as in this case. 
As I say, the object of it is well enough, and, as 
one of the committee to whom it is to be referred, 
I shall take great interest in protecting the laborers, 
of the city. But this ordinance does n't do it. It 
gives rise to a great many complications. For in- 
stance, a case arose last summer which I happened 
to be in. The contractor said he had paid certain 
men; they said he had n't, and gave notice to the 
city. In such cases the work must be stopped or 
the city has got to come in and determine who is 
right and who is wrong. Now in this case the 
laborers gave notice and requested that the 
amount of their wages be left in the hands of the 
city — that is, the Committee on Improved Sewer- 
age; then some one else came up and trus- 
teed it. The money is trusteed, and a. 
case occurred last summer, when it was 
trusteed, and that ties it up for five oi six months, 
as the Committee on Improved Sewerage cannot 
pay it until the trustee is taken off, not if I have 
anything to do with it. In every case it has pro- 
duced confusion and complication, and involved 
the city in disputes between contractors and la- 
borers. I beg the indulgence of the Council while 
I read that ordinance to show how poorly and 
bunglingly expressed it is. It providesthat 

"In every contract entered into on behalf of the 
city and involving the employment of mechanics 
or laborers by the contractor, a provision shall 
be inserted to the effect that the committee, 
board or other authority making such contract 
may, if it deems it expedient to do so, retain out 
of any amounts due to such contractor sums suf- 
ficient to cover any unpaid claims of mechanics 
or laborers for work or labor performed under 
such contrect; provided, that notice in writing of 
such claims, signed by the claimants, shall have 
been previously filed in the office of the City 
Clerk." 

Now that means it shall be inserted in the con- 
tract, provided that the laborers working under 
that contract a year after it was made shall re- 
quest that it shall be inserted. Possibly that is 
not what the gentlemau who drew the ordinance 
intended, but it is what ninety-nine in a hundred 
of the best lawyers who have read it say. If the 
ordinance is to remain, it ought to go to the Com- 
mittee on Ordinances to be amended so as to car- 
ry out the ideas of the makers of it; but 
at present it leads only to complications. The 
Committee on Improved Sewerage are involved in a 
series of complications now, and as the ordinance 
now stands I think it tends to make confusion 
worse confounded. There is a way, if you will al- 
low me to suggest one. When a contractor takes 
a bond from the city he should give a bond to the 
city of Boston that all his contracts made in pur- 
suance of this contracts shall be fulfilled, which, 
of course, includes the payment of the laborers. 
It should be seen to that that bond is 
signed by responsible persons, who will see 
that the contractor complies with it. There 
are now officers who give bond, and if 
they don't perform their duties, any person may 
sue the bond. Constables' bonds are instances 
of the case in point. I don't think the Commit- 
tee on Ordinances will do anything to deprive 
the honest laborer of the wages he earns. 1 am 
not sure but this is faulty and ought to be correct- 
ed, and I think it can be. I hope it will go to the 



44 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Committee on Ordinances to see that it shall he 
amended. I would not have taken so much time 
had I not had a little practical experience and :i 
little insight into this ordinance. I think the 
gentleman is mistaken in saying that it has 
worked well in every case except this. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward !i— Did" I understand the 
gentleman to say that this proviso applies to the 
first section ? 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— Yes, sir. 

Mr. Thompson— And that many lawyers place 
that construction upon it'.' 

Mr. Richardson— Yes. many. 

Mr. Thompson— I don't see where they get any 
authority for placing such a construction upon it. 

Mr. Crocker — I am responsible for the form 
of this ordinance, and propose to back it up. In 
regard to the action upon a bond, which the gen- 
tleman proposes, suppose the laborers are not 
paid? 

Mr. Richardson— Let them bring a suit in the 
name of the city. Wheu a constable's bond is 
sued, the suit is brought in the name of the city. 

Mr. Crocker— That is under a special statute. 

Mr. Richardson— And it is proposed to make a 
special ordinance for this special purpose. 

Mr. Crocker— If the city brings an action upon 
the bond, it can only ret-over the amount of 
damage that it has suffered by a breach of 
the bond. But could it be said that the city has 
suffered bv the non-payment of these laborers? 
What damage has the city suffered? It has suf- 
fered nothing. The question of a bond was con- 
sidered when this thing was up before, and that 
was proposed as a remedy, but it was found that 
it could n't be made to work. 

Mr. Richardson— The city never tried it. 

Mr. Crocker— I have no doubt it does cause 
some trouble to city officials, but I think they can 
take some trouble to save the city. If the labor- 
ers do not get their pay, they come upon the city 
as paupers, and it is dollars and cents in the city 
treasury to look out for them. I asked the City 
Clerk aruonth ago, and he spoke of it as a very 
good ordinance, that it had worked a great deal 
of benefit, and he did n't mention any trouble. 
He said a great many notices had been filed with 
him, and thought they had been the means of 
securing the laborers their pay when they might 
have not rceeived it otherwise. I think he would 
be likely to be troubled as much as anybody. I 
have no doubt that some parties have brought a 
trustee process and found it would n't hold. Of 
course a man may bring an unfounded action; we 
cannot stop that. 

Mr. Brawley of Ward 19—1 understand that in 
this case the contractor gave a bond to the city 
which was satisfactory ; but he let the work to a 
sub-contractor, who hired the men and has n't 
paid them. If I understand the law correctly, 
the men have no security correctly for their mon- 
ey from the sub contractor. The contractor not 
owing the laborers, of course they cannot sue him 
or his bond. I understood the gentleman from 
Ward 9 to say that the men could get a percent- 
age of their claims, and I understood the same 
thing in the Board last Monday. I should like to 
know how they are going to get a percentage of 
their claims. If they sell them for a certain per- 
centage, whv cannot they get the whole? 

Mr. Burke" of Ward 2— "it appears from remarks 
that gentlemen favor protecting the workin<: 
classes of the city. The gentleman from Ward 17 
speaks of sending to the committee to be amend- 
ed; but this is for its repeal. There are gentle- 
men here competent to amend it, and in order 
to give them time to present an amendment I 
move that it be specially assigned to S\'. z o'clock 
next Thuisday evening. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 said it was only to con- 
sider and report, and it was evident the chairman 
opposed the repeal. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 said it was farthest 
from his intention to weaken the interests of the 
laboring men, and he took a great interest in 
strengthening it. 

The motion to assign was lost, and the order 
was passed in concurrence. 

ELECTIONS. 

Certificates came down of the elections of cer- 
tain city officers nominated at the last meeting. 
They were placed on file and elections were or- 
dered;in the regular order, with the following re- 
sults : 

CUy Messenget. Committee— Messrs. Samp- 
son of Ward 17, Ward of Ward 21, Sawyer of 
Ward 24. Alvah H. Peters had sixty-nine votes, 



the whole number cast, and he was declared 
elected in concurrence. 

chrk of Committees. Committee — Messrs. 
Brown of Ward 2:i. Brintnall of Ward 6, and Wool- 
ley of Ward 1. William H. Lee had 65 ballots, the 
whole number cast, and he was declared elected 
in concurrence. 

City Architect. Committee— Messrs. Spenceley 
of Ward 19, Wilson of Ward 20, and Lauten of 
Ward 14. (George A. Clough received 61 ballots, 
John A. Smardon 2, Bateman 1, and Mr. Clough 
was declared elected in concurrence. 

Assesors. Mr. Xason of Ward 17 moved to post- 
pone the election for one week, as he and others 
desired time to investigate the comparative merits 
of Messrs. Duncklee and Robinsou,who were on 
opposition tickets. 

Mr. McGaragle and others objected, and the 
Council refused to postpone, and the election was 
ordered. 

Committee — Messrs. Richardson of Ward 11, 
Hill of Ward 14, and Kendricken of Ward 20. 

Whole number of ballots 69 

Necessary for a choice 35 

Thomas Hills 67 

Benjamin ("ushiiiR 68 

Benjamin F. Palmer 68 

Edward F. Robinson 63 

Joshuas. Duncklee 49 

Horace Smith 23 

And Messrs. Hills, Cusbing, Palmer, Robinson 
and Duncklee were declared elected in concur- 
rence. 

Commissioner on Cedar drove Cemetery. Com- 
miittee— Messrs. Pierce of Ward 24, Burke of 
Ward 2, and Rust of Ward 10. William Pope had 
58 ballots, and Edwin Sibley 1, and Mr. Pope was 
declared elected in concurrence. 

City Engineer. Committee — Messrs. Richard- 
son of Ward 10, I'cinald of Ward 15 and Howland 
of Ward 5. Joseph P. Davis had 60 ballots, and 
Robert M. Thompson 1, and Mr. Davis was de- 
clared elected in concurrence. 

City Surveyor. Committee — Messrs. McGaragle 
of Ward 8, Barry of Ward 8, and Plimpton of 
Ward 21. Thomas W. Davis received 58 ballots, 
and he was declared elected in concurrence. 

City Registrar. Committee— Messrs. Thorndike 
of Ward 2, Hibbard of Ward 17, and Devlin of 
Ward 13. N. A. Apollonio had 54 ballots ; 
Webster F. Warren, H. W. Man 1, and Geoige 
A. Sbaw 1, and Mr. Apollonio was declared 
elected in concurrence. 

Vi'il Solicitor. Committee— Messrs. Crocker of 
Ward 9, Taylor of Ward 16, and Brintnall of Ward 

3. John P. Healey had 51 ballots, George A. Shaw 

4. Halsy J. Boardman 1, John A. Smardon i, A. 
Samuel Brown 1, J. Lewis Stackpole 1, George A. 
Sennoth 1, Paul West 1, Frederick <). Prince 1, 
and Mr. Healy was declared elected in concur- 
rence. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings. Commit- 
tee— Messrs. Wolcott of Ward 11, Clapp of Ward 
14, and McDonald of Ward 12. .lames C. Tucker 
had 52 votes, John Kelley 1, A. Samuel Brown 1, P. 
F. McGaragle 1, E. W. James 1, Nathaniel Adams 
1, George W. Pope 1, Abbey W. May 1, and Mr. 
Tucker was declared elected in concurrence. 

Superintendent of Sewers. Committee— Messrs. 
Thompson of Ward 9, Webster of Ward:;, and 
Wilson of Ward 20. William H. Bradley had 42 
votes, Lucia M. Peabody 2, Simeon B. Smith 2, 
M. F. Wells 1, Stephen Connolly 1, J. A. Smardon 
1, Samuel L. Miuot 1, George A. Shaw 1, George 
H. Yibbertl, Eugene H. Sampson 3, Alfred S. 
Brown 1, John Taylor 1, and Mr. Bradley was 
declared elected in concurrence. 

Superintendent of Public Lands. Committee- 
Messrs. Pearl of Ward 1, Mullen of Ward 13, and 
Roach of Ward 7. Robert W. Hall had 30 votes, 
Oscar Hosmer 5, George A. Shaw 1, Horace Smith 
1, James F. McCluskey 1, W. J. R. Evans 1, Isaac 
P. Clarke 1, S. Edward Shaw 1, F. O. Prince 1, 
Samuel C. Cobb 1, Isaac Rosnosky 1, H. AY. Saw- 
yer 1, and Mr. Hall was declared elected in con- 
currence. 

Water Registrar. Committee— Messrs. Perham 
of Ward 23, Ham of Ward 8, and Whicher of 
Ward 20. William F. Davis received 36 votes, 
John Good 1, Wendell Phillips 1, Horace Smith 1, 

5. P. Hibbardy 1, Harvey D. Parker 1, Benjamin 
F. Butler 1, Sultan of Turkey 1. and .i votes tor in- 
eligible persons, and Mr. Davis was declared 
elected in concurrence. 

A PERSONAL EXPLANATION. 

Mr. Spencelev of Ward 9 said that he was cred- 
ited in the report of last meeting with presenting 



FEBRUARY 



1878 



45 



a remonstrance of Gardner Warren against the 
reelection of Charles Harris as Superintendent of 
Streets. He never saw the petition and did not 
present it. It was handed to the President by 
the Clerk, and as the President opened it, he [Mr. 
S.] arose and addressed the Ch air to offer another 
petition, ana the reporter erroneously supposed 
he offered this one. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Order to allow the bill of P. H. Rogers, $8.50, 
chargeable to Sewers. Passed. Sent up. 

Order to display flags and riug the bells of the 
city on Washington's Birthday. Passed— Yeas 
5€, nays 0. Sent up. 

Order for a transfer of $359.17 from appropri- 
ation for Fever Hospital, Gallop's Island, to that 
for Quarantine Department. Passed — Yeas 56, 
nays 0. Sent up. 

Order for a transfer from Reserved Fund to 
appropriation for Sewers, of the sum of $9000. 
Passed in concurrence— Yeas 56, nays 0. 

REPORTS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Auditor of Accounts. Exhibit for Feb. 1st. To- 
tal appropriations, $15,913,016.70; expended, $12,- 
041,991.96; balance unexpended, $3,871,024.74. Sent 
up. 

City Registrar. Abstract of annual report for 
1877. Marriage certificates issued, 3348; deaths, 
7284; births, 10,480. Sent up. 

PETITION FOR AID BY LABORERS. 

By Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19— Petition of H. W. 
Brown et al., asking for an appropriation for the 
labor rs who worked on the South Boston sewer, 
and whose wages weie left unpaid by Stephen 
Connelly & Co., or for such other equitable action 
as may be deemed advisable. They claim that if 
there is a defect in the ordinance relating to con- 
tracts involving the employment of labor, they 
should not be made to suffer thereby. 

Mr. Spenceley moved to refer to Committee on 
Improved Sewerage. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 said it was in conse- 
quence of a flaw in the ordinance and the Council 
see the necessity tor a change. He moved to refer 
to Committee on Ordinances. 

Mr. Crocker said the petition said "if there is a 
defect in the ordinance," but did not say it was 
because of a defect. 

Mr. Spenceley said it was handed to him to 
present," but he did not know what could be done. 
If the committee can see any way of paying the 
money he hoped the men would receive it. 

Mr. Thompson thought it should go to the Com- 
mittee on Claims, and he so moved. 

Mr. McGaragle thought the Improved Sewerage 
Committee the proper reference. 

Mr. Sampson said that committee already un- 
derstood the whole case. 

Mr. Spenceley said the laborers had probably 
learned from Mr. Sampson of the defect in the 
ordinance. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 said it was not a 
claim against the city, and it could not be enter- 
tained by that committee. 

The motions to refer to Committees on Claims 
and Ordinances were lost, and the petition was 
referred to Committee on Improved Sewerage. 

Sent up. 

EAST BOSTON FERRIES. 

Mr. Pearl of Ward 1 presented a request from 
the Board of Directors of East Boston Ferries for 
authority to contract for the necessary fuel to be 
used in the department under their charge during 
the next financial year; the expense to be paid 
from the appropriation to be made for East Bos- 
ton Ferries for the financial year 1878-79. Re- 
ferred, on motion of Mr. Pearl, to the Committee 
on the Ferries. Sent up. 

Mr. Hibbard of Ward 17 presented a request 
from the Directors of East Boston Eerries for au- 
thority to contract for a new ferry boat at a cost 
not to exceed $45,000, and also for authority to 
sell at auction or private sale, at such time as 
they think best, the ferry-boat General Grant, the 
proceeds to be paid to. the City Collector. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Ferries. 

MILL POND FLATS. 

Mr. Sibley presented the following: 
To the Honorable the City Council of Boston : 
Geatlemen— The Board of Health, to whom was 
referred the order relative to the Mill Pond flats 
under date of Feb. 4, instant, respectfully report 
that for a year or two, perhaps more, the place 
mentioned has been in a state of nuisance, preju- 



dicial to the public health, and a number of com- 
plaints have been made to this board about it. 

A petition for relief was presented to the City 
Council last summer by citizens of the Charles- 
town District, and a hearing thereon had by the 
Committee on Health in July last, which resulted- 
in the accompaning Resolve, communicated to 
this board Oct. 8, following: 

"City of Boston, Oct. 8, 1877, ) 
In Board of Aldermen. J 

Resolved, That in the obinion of the City Coun- 
cil, the Board of Health should take immediate 
measures to abate the nuisance created by the 
Mill Pond and adjoining flats in the Charlestown 
District. 

Passed in Common Council. Came up for con- 
currence; read and concurred. 

Approved by the Mayor Oct. 9, 1877." 

Time was necessary to determine upon the best 
method of abating the nuisance, to take sound- 
ings, obtain plans, estimates, etc. ; and it became 
impracticable, owing to the lateness of the season, 
to extend the Canal-street sewer below the line of 
filling, if filled. 

The owners of the territory, so far as we know, 
are the Eastern Railroad, Prentiss and Horace 
Sargent, the Boston & Maine Railroad and the 
Commonwealth. 

If the city is to till, provision should be made for 
indemnity. 

The Harbor Commissioners claim compensation 
for displacement of tide water. We deny their 
right to it. 

The act asked for is to give the city a lien upon 
the territory filled for the expense of abating the 
nuisance; and, that there may be no dispute here- 
after, to exempt the city, her agents, servants and 
all who do the filling, from payment tor tide- 
water displacement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. H. Durgin, Chairman. 

The report was accepted and sent up, and the 
question came on ordering to a second reading 
the order to petition the Legislature for an act 
authorizing the city to abate the nuisance, the 
city to have a lien on the land filled. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11— I move that it be spe- 
cially assigned to next Thursday, at 8.30 P. M., 
and that the Board of Health give us an estimate 
of the expense. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3— The only reason for ap- 
parently hurrying this matter is that the 22d 
inst. is the last day for presenting petitions to the 
Legislature without a four-fifths vote ; otherwise 
we would let it remain three months it necessary. 
This order was considered last year: the Commit- 
tee on Health had a large hearing, the result of 
which was the committee reported the following: 

The Joint Committee on Health, to whom was 
referred the petition of S. D. Sawin & Co., that 
Prison Point flats be filled up, submit the tclluw- 
ing report : 

Your committee, from a careful examination of 
the locality and the testimony of many residents 
of different sections in the Charlestown District, 
find that a great nuisance exists on the premises 
referred to in the petition, and consider the same 
dangerous to public health; and whatever may 
be the cost of abating this nuisance, it should not 
be suffered to continue there another summer, 
and they would earnestly recommend the passage 
of the following order: 

Resolved, That in the opinion of the City Coun- 
cil, the Board of Health should take immediate 
measures to abate the nuisance created by the 
Mil) Pond Flats and adjoining flats in the Charles- 
town District. 

The Board of Health have notified the parties 
that this nuisance exists, and stated to us a short 
time ago that they intend to proceed upon this 
work. Another object of this is to secure the city 
against any possible expense. No one wants to 
put a cent into the hands of a corporation or take 
any land, or anything of that kind. But the 
Board of Health deem this act necessary. It orig- 
inated in their office, and was offered by a mem- 
ber of the Committee on Health in the "Board of 
Aldermen; and, if I understand it, the Board and 
Committee on Health desire it to nass. The only 
question is the displacement of tide-water, for 
which the Harbor Commissioners claim $270,000. 
The Board of Health say they can have no such 
claim; at all events, it is a bugbear in the way . 
and until it is settled by an act of the Legislature 
giving us this power, neither the owners or the 
Board of Health will be justified in going ahead on 
this matter at so great an expense. It is to do just 



4(> 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



enough to abate the nuisance, and it is a matter 
upon which figures can hardly he given in so short 
a time. It is the opinion that the large quantity 
of ashes near there should he dumped into the 
worst place there, and if private parties do not go 
ahead, as they say they will, the Board will it it is 
necessary. The only object ol the act is to get 
the displacement ot tide water out of the way. A 
week's delay will cause a great waste of time. 

iMr. MeGaragle of Ward 8 -1 can see reasons for 
the assignment, on account of this displacement 
ot tide water. If it is a nuisance the Board of 
Health can make them till it up; hut before we go 
to the Legislature we ought to know what the ex- 
pense is. 

.Mr. Sibley of Waul 5— If we get a lieu upon this 
land, I don't know how one dollar can be spent on 
the land unless we vote the money: and I think it 
is worth trying for. Any one who has been there 
can see it is a nuisance, lor which the city is in a 
measure accountable on account of emptying a 
sewer there. In 1872 I learned that Charlestown 
had the right to fill that laud, and the city of Bos- 
ton has the same right. Everything has been 
done by the Board of Health that can be, and I 
hope this order will pass as they have requested. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward '.)— The Harbor Commis- 
sion was established in the interest of the har- 
bor of Boston, and does not exact any compensa- 
tion for the displacement of tide water except 
in the interest* of the harbor of Boston. If 
corporations have land they do not desire to fill 
up, and it they can get an act for displacing the 
tidewater free of cost to them, and if 'the land is 
rilled the corporations will step in and take it 
back. It has got to be made up in some way, and 
then if the State pays for it the city will do so 
largely. 

Mr. Sibley— The lawyers do not agree in regard 
to the question whether the commissioners can 
exact compensation if the Board of Health de- 
clare it a nuisance. They demanded compensa- 
tion for displacement of tidewater in one place 
and were notified to try it on, but have never 
done so. The Board of Health say their decision 
is fiual. 

Mr. Thompson— 1 say the corporations are 
willing to have the question tested by using the 
city as a cat's paw to prevent them from running 
that risk. I con't know anything about the 
merits ot the question. I think the motion a fail- 
one, as there will be time. 

Mr. Webster— A week ago members wanted 
more time and it was referred to the Board of 
Health, who reported pretty satisfactorily. The 
board take the ground that where there is a great 
nuisance they can order it abated and the Harbor 
Commissioners cannot have a claim for dis- 
placement; and that is backed up by 
good legal authority. But in order that a 
matter of that kind may not hang over, it is 
desired to settle the question by obtaining this 
act. If anybody opposes it it is the corporations, 
who have valuable property which they will want 
to use. If anybody thinks there is not* a nuisance 
there they differ from the Board of Health and 
the committees of last and this year. If they 
would go over and take a smell they would be 
convinced. 

Mr. Mowry— 1 merely asked delay that it might 
be considered. It will inevitably involve the city 
in a large amount. The Board has given us no 
approximate estimate of the expense, and a week's 
delay will not prevent its being presented to the 
Legislature. 

The subject was specially assigned to the next 
meeting at 8.30 1*. M. 

Subsequently Mr. Mowry offered an order — 
That the Board of Health furnish an estimate of 
the expense attending the filling of the Charles- 
town Hats. 

At the suggestion of Mr. Webster, .Mr. Mowry 
amended the order so as to read "the cost ot 
abating the nuisance on" the Charlestown flats. 

The order was passed. Sent up. 

NOMINATION. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 submitted a report from 
the Nominating Committee on Superintendent of 
Public Grounds, recommending the reelection of 
John Galvin. Councilman Mullane dissents from 
the foregoing and recommends the election of 
William Doogue. Accepted. Sent up. 

In connection with the above Mr. Sampson of 
Ward 17 presented the following: 

The undersigned, horticulturists and florists of 
Boston and its vicinity, learning that Mr. William 



Doogue is a candidate for the position of City For- 
ester, hereby testify that they have known Mr. 
Doogue many years as a first-class gardener and 
florist, and they believe that, as City Forester, he 
would reflect the highest credit on the office and 
subserve the best interests of the city. Signed, 
('. M. Hovey, Marshall P. Wilder, Mintou Broth- 
ers, Alexander Greenlaw, Henry F. Thayer, and 
twenty-six others. 
Sent up. 

B M IB r.AN I'ARK, 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17, submitted a report 
from the Finance Committee on an order authoriz- 
ing the Park Commissioners to spend $.'5,000 in 
improving the Back Bay Park, with the order 
granting the request, iu a new draft: 

Ordered, That the Park Commissioners be and 
they hereby are authorized to expend the sum of 
$26,000 in filling, grading, surveying and laying 
out the Back Bay Park, so-called, and that the 
Auditor of Accounts he and he hereby is author- 
ized to transfer from the Reserved Fund to the 
appropriation tor Public Park, Back Bay, the 
sum of $25,000, to be expended for the special pur- 
poses designated in this order. 

On motion of Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 the rule 
was suspended, and the order read a second time 
and passed— yeas 57, nays 0. Sent up. 

MORE LAND FOB BACK HAY l'ARK. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 submitted the follow- 
ing: 

The Joint Special Committee on Public Parks, to 
whom was referred the third annual report of the 
I'ark Commissioners, beg leave to report that they 
have considered the request of the commissioners 
for authority to purchase additional land for the 
Back Bay Park, and are of the opinion that 
the authority should be granted. This addi- 
tional land is required for the Longwood en- 
trance to the park, and for continuing the Bea- 
con-street entrance to Charles River, and a glance 
at the plan will show that the appearance of the 
park and the facilities for entrance thereto will 
be greatly improved by the acquisition. The com- 
mittee would respectfully recommend the passage 
of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That the Park Commissioners be and 
they are hereby authorized to purchase two and 
815-1000 acres of land comprised in a part of 
the Longwood entrance to the Back Bay Park, 
for the sum of not exceeding §13,000, and that 
they be also authorized to purchase, at a cost not 
exceeding ten cents per square foot, such land as 
may be required to continue the Beacon entrance 
of the Back Bay Park to Charles River, provided 
that the total cost thereof does not exceed the 
sum of $3000. 

Referred, on motion of Mr. Thompson, to the 
Finance Committee. Sent up. 

SALARY OF < LKKK OV PASE COMMISSIONERS, 

The Joint Special Committee on Parks, to whom 
was referred the communication from the Park 
Commissioners in relation to the salary of their 
clerk, having considered the subject, beg leave 
to submit the following report- 

The Committee of the City Council of 1(577 on the 
Retrenchment of Municipal Expenses, in their 
report, recommended that the salary of the clerk 
of the Board of ParK Commissioners be fixed at 
the rate of ten hundred and fitty dollars per an- 
num. In the City Council Minutes, page 01, this 
amount was erroneously printed "eleven hundred 
and fifty dollars," and the Park Commissioners 
being misled thereby, voted to fix the salary of 
their clerk at the rate which they supposed had 
been recommended by the committee. The salary 
has been paid at this rate until recently, when the 
error was discovered. As the Park Commission- 
ers are authorized by chapter 185 of the acts of 
1875, to fix the salaries of their employes, the com- 
mittee are of the opinion that the clerk of the 
board is entitled to the salary established by the 
commissioners, and would, therefore, respectful- 
ly recommend the passage of the following order. 
For the committee, 

Robkrt M. Thompson. 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be au- 
thorized to allow and pay the salary of the clerk 
of the Board of Park Commissioners at the rate of 
eleven hundred and fifty dollars per annum, from 
the first day of April, 1877. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Nason of Ward 17. 



47 



BOAE.D O^ ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 11, 1878. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. HI., Alder- 
nianStebbins presiding. 

EXECUTIVE API-OINTMENTS. 

Special Police Officers without pay— David H. 
Deckie, James Skillen. Confirmed. 

Superintendent ot Faneuil Hall Market — George 
E. McKay. Confirmed. 

Registrar of Voters— Linus E- Pearson. Con- 
firmed. 

Inspector of Milk— Henry Faxon. Confirmed. 

Superintendent of Wagons and Trucks— Timo- 
thy R. Page, Confirmed. 

Superintendent of Hacks and Carriages— Rufus 
C. Marsh. Continued. 

Superintendent of Intelligence Offices— Benja- 
min I). Hurley. Confirmed. 

Superintendent of Pawnbrokers— William H. 
McCausland. Confirmed. 

Measurer of Grain— George P. Ray. Confirmed. 

Constables— William S. Post, Edward W. Col- 
man, C. C. Kendall. Confirmed. 

PETITION'S REFERRED. 

To the Committee on Public Lands. R. T. Paine, 
Jr., et ill., for leave to exchange a lot of land on 
Dartmouth street for a lot belonging to the city. 

To tin Com -11/1111' mi Police. John Maguire, for 
leave to place a lettered lamp in front of 638 
Main street, Charlestown. 

To the Joint Committee on Ordinances. H. W. 
Brown ct al., of Boston Section Socialistic Labor 
Party, for the discontinuance of the contract sys- 
tem in the public works of this city. 

To the (tommittee on Common on the part of 
the Board. E. N. Reed, for leave to use tree 
box at 75 Harrison avenue for an advertising 
medium. 

To th" Committee on Nomination of Inspec- 
tors ot Lighters. Kartholomew G. Pollard, lor 
the office ni Inspector and Weigher of Lighters. 

To the Committee on Lamps. Joseph W. Tuck- 
er et at., that a lamp be located on Lambert 
street, Ward 21; Everett K. Dexter, that Oakville 
avenue, from St. James street, Roxbury, be light- 
ed; Edward R.Andrews et O.I., that A Street, in 
South Boston, be lighted. 

To the Committee on Paving. Leonard B. 
Hathon ctat., that the name of Main-street court 
be (hanged to Hathon square; George H.Rich- 
ards et (it., tor the paving of Cambridge street, 
Charlestown; Nathan L. Eaton rt al., that the 
name of Richmond street, Charlestown, be 
changed to Rutherford street; Richard Sullivan 
it til -, that a portion of sidewalk on the Peacock 
estate on Cambridge street, Charlestown, may be 
laid; Metropolitan Railroad Company, for leave 
to substitute a double track for their single track 
in Boylston street, between Washington street 
and Tremont streets: Lawrence D. welby et al., 
th it the wages of laborers in the Paving Depart- 
ment be increased; Mary Noonan, for abatement 
of edgestone assessment against her estate on 
Boylston avenue, Ward 23; William H. Peabody 
il'il., that Lamartine street, Ward 23, between 
Oak place and Boylston street, be macadamized, 
etc. 

CAMBRIDGE RAILROAD. 

A hearing was had on the petition of the Cam- 
bridge Railroad Company for leave to extend 
their location through certain streets so as to run 
their cars to Summer street. 

J. L. Stackpole appeared for the company, 
Charles J. Mclntire for the petitioners of Chim- 
in idge in aid of the petition of the company, and 
E. Worthen James for the remonstrants at the 
We-t End against the petition. 

Mr. Stackpole opened the case for the petition- 
ers, and called upon Mr. Chase, the engineer, to 
present the plans ot the proposed location, and 
on motion ol Alderman Whidden a recess of five 
minutes was taken tor the purpose of examining 
them, after which Mr. Chase explained the route. 
The places where the distance between the track 
and the curb is narrowest are on Merrimac street, 
at the Merrimac House, and on Devonshire street, 
near State street. He had made measurements on 
other streets where the tracks were nearer the 
curbstones than at any point on this route. The 



distance from Leverett to Summer street is 5050 
feet, and from Chardon street to Summer street 
is 4502 feet. 

Mr. Emery, president of the Union Railway 
Company, gave a history of the Cambridge road, 
beginning with its charter in 1855, the increase of 
the business necessitating the Stopping of the 
changing of horses at Bowdotn square and laying 
the tracks in Green and Chambers streets: the 
road started with ten to twenty cars and fifty 
horses; the construction of the Somerville branch 
line; the road carried in 1867,21,606 passengers 
daily, running 33,900 miles daily, employing 128 
cars, 850 hor.-es, 12 stables, and 850 men, and pays 
a tax of nearly $20,000 annually. They have bad a 
pressure tor increased ac< ommodation, and in 
consequence of that they present this petition. 
The people who patronize the line for which 
this accommodation is asked are about C000, 
who daily come in and out of the city. The 
bn-iness centre has been removed farther 
south from what it formerly was, and pas- 
sengers luve much longer distance to waik 
to and from Bowdoin square. They do not desire 
to take patronage from any other read, but to 
accommodate their own patrons. He understood 
the Middle-ex and Metropolitan roads do not 
object to using their tracks. [To Alderman Guild] 
This route would accommodate about 0000 people 
daily, averaging 38 l / 2 passengers per trip: the 
average dividend has been 7 1 ., to 10 per cent, free 
of tax; it is 3' ;! miles from Bowdoin square to 
Harvard square, and the single fare is ten cents, 
twelve tickets for a dollar; there is no rival road, 
and if they bad the same number of passengers 
the Metropolitan has, they could do so for the 
same fare. [To Alderman Perkins] Do not know 
how much tax the road pays to Boston. 

[To Mr. James]— Have never issued transfer 
tickets, because theie are no people within the 
Grand Junction line, for which the act was in- 
tended. By an agreement between the Metropoli- 
tan Railroad Company and Cambridge road the 
former issues a ticket to Boylston street and the 
northern depots for *_"._> cents, which has taken the 
place of the other ticket. 

Mr. James questioned Mr. Emery closely about 
the lease of the other toads by the Union, and 
Alderman Harris asked if the "examination could 
not be confined to the facts in the case. 

Mr. James said he wanted to show that they 
had leased roads at ten per cent, and taxes, and 
didn't accommodate the people, ana Mr. Emery 
knows all about it. It the Board don't want to 
hear about it. all right. 

The Chairman ruled that Mr. James was in 
order, and Mr. Emery's examination by Mr. James 
was continued. 

The roads leased by the Union road are the 
Somerville, for six per cent, and taxes; Water- 
town, six per cent, and taxes; Cambridge road, 
nine per cent, and taxes deducted. Mr. James 
was proceeding to question Mr. Emery in regard 
to certain matters in regard to legislation, and 
was called to order by the Chairman. [To Mr. 
Stackpolej— The ten-cent fare carries a passenger 
up to near the Arlington line and Mt. Auburn; the 
fare in Cambridge is five cents. 

Dr. Estes Howe said he was an original director 
in the road, and he also gave a resume of the 
earl; history thereof in connection with the 
progress of other r.ads in Boston and its vicinity. 
The early policy of the roads and the City Govern- 
ment was to connect the various lines, and the 
roads to first introduce the commutation system 
were the Cambridge and the old Suffolk, the lat- 
ter now merged into the Metropolitan. Other 
roads have gained additional locations, and the 
Cambridge road has not kept pace with them ; they 
had delayed asking for locations because of the 
crowded State of the streets, and now they felt they 
would be unjust to their own interests if they did 
not present and urge this petition. [To Mr. 
Guild]- The Union road pays the Cambridge road 
nine per cent, and takes out the taxes due the 
State, and has to get its own dividend out of what 
it can earn after furnishing the equipment. [To 
Mr. Stackpole]— People coine in over this road 
from Arlington, Somerville, Watertown, and 
Brighton ; and the most expensive line to keep up 
is that to Brighton, which is run at a daily loss. 
[To Mr. James]— They pay to Boston in taxes on 
two stables and the stock owned by citizens of 
Boston. [I'o the Board]— The streets of Boston 
are for the convenience of al) mankind, and not 
merely to the taxpayers of Boston. 

Mr. "Stackpole introduced Mr. Mclntire, coun- 
sel for the petitioners in aid, who said he should 



FEBRUARY 11, 1878 



48 



show what benefit the extension would be to citi- 
zens of Soinerville and Cambridge. He read the 
titles of the petitions presented for this ex- 
tension last year; ' they represent business 
firms and corporations and all classes 
of people. They had seen the residents of 
other suburban localities coming farther and far- 
ther into Boston, and still these petitioners were 
left at Bowdoin square. The centre of the retail 
trade has been removed nearly f our-fifths of a mile 
from Bowdoin square, and the extension will not 
only be an accommodation to the petitioners, but 
be an act of -justice to the merchants ot Boston, 
to whom the petitioners pay a very large tribute. 
Many of the merchants and manufacturers have 
capital invested in Cambridge; the people of 
Cambridge and Somerville bring their mouey into 
Boston and spend it here in the retail and 
wholesale stores. Cambridge and Somer- 
ville are farther within the five-mile line than sev- 
eral large portions of Boston. They desired to 
continue in the same car to Summer street and 
save the additional fare and inconvenience caused 
by a change under the present system. 

Ex-Mayor Brastow of Somerville said the only 
interest he had in the petition was in common 
with other patrons of the road; they first came to 
Haymarket square through Charlestown, and af- 
terward to Scollay square, and felt happy; finally 
the Cambridge road put in the link and they came 
to Bowdoin square. Now, they find themselves 
far away from the centre of the retail trade, and 
Somerville has its share of mothers, wives and 
daughters who spend money in Boston. He 
sketched the growth of Somerville from its 6000 
inhabitants to its present 20,000, the bulk of whose 
capital is taxed in Boston, and where they spend 
the bulk of the money. Hardly a house in the 
city but was furnished from top to bottom from 
Boston stores; and they proposed to build more 
houses to be furnished from Boston. He only 
wanted an equal chance to get into the city with 
other suburban residents. The petition was sign- 
ed by the representative men of Somerville. 

Mayor Bruce of Somerville said all he could 
say was, there is a very general feeling among 
the residents of Somerville that they have a 
cause for complaint that they are not able to be 
carried by the horse cars into the more central 
part of the city, and that it would be a great ac- 
commodation to the whole people of Somerville if 
the petition presented by the railroad company 
could be granted. He doubted if there was a 
place in the vicinity of Boston of equal popula- 
tion where there are so few shops and stores as in 
Somerville, and the residents substantially do all 
their purchasing in Boston. 

Alderman Whidden asked if the system of in- 
terchanging tickets, now advocated at the State 
House, would not accommodate the petitioners, 
and Mr. Emery said he should think not, because 
they would have to stop and wait for cars, and 
get out from one car into another, and wait for 
the arrival of cars as they came along. This 
route would not be a paying one. 

Ex-Mayor Allen of Cambridge said the desire 
was to be brought farther into Boston ; more than 
10,000 people ride into Boston daily and go out; 
very few stop near Bowdoin square ; women go to 
the retail stores, and all will be accommodated by 
coming farther into the city. He had conversed 
with all classes, and the desire is universal. 

George L. Michell, an assessor of Cambridge, 
said that one petition of citizens from that city 
represented the business men in Ward 3, where 
the feeling is universal that they ought to have 
the same accommodations that other surround- 
ings ot Boston have; and the other petition repre- 
sented business men in other parts of that city. 

Ex- Mayor Parmenter of Cambridge corrobo- 
rated other witnesses as to the desire for the ac- 
commodation; and so great was this desire that 
many patronize the antediluvian style of travel — 
the omnibus— because it takes them farther into 
the city. 

Judge Sanger wanted for himself and family 
and the other citizens of Cambridge as much ac- 
commodation at as low rate of fare as possible. 
They should not stop at Bowdoin square any more 
than residents of Roxbury should stop at Dover 
street, or of South Boston at Beach street. The 
streets are public highways, and he knew no rea- 
son why one section should be deprived of the 
privilege of using the highways, while another 
was allowed that privilege. Room was found for 
the Charlestown cars, and the citizens of Cam- 
bridge could be accommodated in the same way. 
They wanted to get farther toward the centre of 



the city without change ot car and paying an ad- 
ditional fare. 

I. S. Morse said there had been a full and accu- 
rate representation of the feeling of Cambridge 
on the subject. The transfer-ticket system does 
not accommodate the people, who said that if the 
Cambridge road did n't give the required accom- 
modation, they would get some other road that 
would; and this petition is almost forced upon 
the company. This is a question of accommodat- 
ing public travel, and Boston cannot object to 
whatever helps develop its business and accom- 
modates its citizens and visitors. Horse cars ac- 
commodate the great public; if the Board connot 
allow all the cars to come, let some come in. 

Mr. Chaffee explained the commutation-ticket 
system for the benefit of Mr. James. 

Mr. James said he represented two or 
three hurdred peop!e in the city who pay 
taxes and do not go to Cambridge to pay 
taxes, and they oppose this petition. He claimed 
that the Cambridge road agreed in its sixth loca- 
tion to issue the commutation tickets. Merri- 
mac street is already over-crowded with teams. 
Mr. James spoke at some length in a humorous 
style against the management of the Union Rail- 
road, which he said was the most independent 
corporation in the world, and the Metropolitan 
were virtuous people compared to it. He did n't 
care where they went to, if the Board kept them 
out of Merrimac street. He concluded by pre- 
senting the remonstrance. 

Mr. Stiles, proprietor of the East Cambridge 
omnibus line, had the Chairman read a remon- 
strance by citizens of East Cambridge against 
this locatiou, and called John McSorley, who said 
he signed the petition in behalf of the Union road 
by the Cambridge City Government last year; but 
this petition is merely for East Cambridge; and 
this route is proposed so that they will take off 
Mr. Stiles's omnibus line. East Cambridge is very 
well accommodated, those desiring to go to Sum- 
mer street taking the coaches. 

Mr. Stiles said the people of East Cambridge are 
better accommodated tnan they would be with 
the granting of the proposed route. The Board 
refused him the right to go through Court street, 
and kept him down on a back street, where he 
carried a great many passengers. The bulk of 
travel want to go through Bowdoin square and 
get into Scollay square." They can get to Sum- 
mer street ten minutes quicker than by the pro- 
posed route. He moved about two thousand 
passengers a day, but did n't carry as many 
out as he brought in. The Cambridge road 
charges ten cents fare in, and 2V> cents more for 
a transfer, taking the 2% cents out of the Metro- 
politan, making the fare 12*2 cents. People are 
not delayed more than a minute at Bowdoin 
square to get a car to Summer street. [To Alder- 
man Guild] — The fare by omnibus is five cents 
from Summer street to East Cambridge; by horse 
railroad a single fare is six cents. 

In closing the case for the petitioners, Mr. 
Stackpole said he would argue the case only from 
a Boston point ot view. It they looked at it mere- 
ly for the interest of their own taxpayers, the pe- 
tition should be granted. The wealth and pros- 
perity of Boston are centred in the little peninsu- 
la, but the people have been forced out of it into 
what is the Boston lor which the Board are to 
legislate. The people in the surrounding 
cities and towns are as much a part of Boston as 
the people on the peninsula, and their interests 
are identical ; and the Board should know no dis- 
tinction between tuose enrolled within its munici- 
pal limits and those who are not. The self- 
ish interest of Boston is to draw into 
this little peninsula all who want to transact any 
business or by the smallest article for household 
use and decoration, and to discourage the setting 
up of stores in those districts. This can be done 
by encouraging easy facilities for communication 
between Boston and these towns, and the easi- 
est method for cheap and easy communi- 
cation is the horse railroad. Take up the 
tracks from the streets and a greater "storm 
of public indignation would arise from the 
people than any other measure has ever 
aroused. Every suburban section is provided for 
except the ones covered by this petition. The 
road do not propose to get more fares, but to give 
more facilities for travel. He believed the capi- 
tal represented by the Cambridge and Tuion 
roads was less per mile than that of the Metro- 
politan or Highland. As to opposition, be would 
put the 1900 petitioners in aid from the North and 
West End against Mr. Jame«'s 300; not an abutter 



49 



liOARD OF ALDERMEN 



appeared against it. .Mr. Staekpole presented 
anil called attention to petitions for tbe location 
signed by business firms in Boston in the different 
branches of business. 

On motion of Alderman I'erkins the various pa- 
pers were recommitted to the Committee on 
Paving. 

I'll B OOORT BOCSB. 

The following was received and read: 

To the Hoar'i of Aldermen of Boston: Gentie- 
men— I have the honor to transmit herewith a 
.■'II n in i in ic,it.ii in from the Chief .Justice of the Su- 
preme Judicial Court of the Commonwealth, call- 
ing attention to the insufficiency and inconven- 
ience of the present County Court House, and the 
obligation resting upon the city to provide suita- 
ble accommodations in some other locality. 

Mindful of the suggestion made in nay inaugu- 
ral addiess, that no new improvements involving 
ex iense should be entered upon during the pres- 
ent year, unless it is made clear that lurther de- 
lay would injuriously affect the city's interests, I 
have hesitated about recommending immediate 
action upou tbe subject of this communication, 
until satisfied from personal examination that the 
public interests demanded it. 

During the past twenty years variousexpedients 
have been resorted to for the purpose of overcom- 
ing the disadvantages of the present builoing and 
its surroundings, but tbe ingenuity of architects 
and builders has been taxed iu vain. A commit- 
tee of the Hoard of Aldermen, reporting upon the 
subject in 1871, said, "The present condition of 
the court accommodations is such that to delay 
action longer would be discreditable to the city. 
The situation of the present building is conven- 
ient, but the difficulties of providing sufficient 
room within the limited space tor the transaction 
ot all the court business, ami at the same time se- 
curing proper ventilation and lreedom from in- 
terruption, are insurmountable. There appears 
to be no other course, therefore, but to erect a 
new building in another locality." 

The committee recouimeudeu the taking of the 
estates mi Mt. Vernon street, between Temple and 
Hancock streets, and the laud adjoining the 
same, occupied by the Beacon Hill Reservoir, but 
before any action had been taken a communica- 
tion was received from the Water Board stating 
that the reservoir (the use of which had been dis- 
continued for some time) might be required again 
in case of emergency to supply the high service in 
that section of the city. The subject was then 
referred to the next City Council. In his in- 
augural address, Jan. 1, 1872, Mayor Gaston said— 

••There is an urgent necessity for a new Court 
House. The present structure is uufortunately 
situated, and is not well adapted to the uses for 
which it was designed. It is no credit to the city 
or county. The subject of erecting a new build- 
ing has been discussed for rive years or more, 
and no progress has been made. Each City Coun- 
cil has talked about or discussed it mine or less, 
and has ilone nothing more. The chief difficulty 
has consisted iu the selectioh of a suitable site. 
I commend the subject not only to your early at- 
tention, but to your early and prompt action. Un- 
less vou act immediately you will be in danger of 
leaving the subject to your successors, to be taken 
up by them not at the point at, which you may 
leave it, but at the point at which you may com- 
mence the investigation aud inquiry. The de- 
mand lor a new building is so urgent and impera- 
tive that your action i,if you take any action) 
must be very unreasonable if it fail to meet with 
my approval." 

I'he committee to whom this portion of the 
Mayor's address was referred reported in lavor of 
the reservoir site, aud stated that "arrangements 
had been made with the Mystic Water Board 
winch obviated the uecessity of maintaining the 
reservoir any longer." The great fire of Nov. 9 
occurred soon after this report was submitted, 
aud in view of the heavy losses sustained by the 
taxpayers it was considered inexpedient to incur 
the expense of building the Court House at that 
time. No further action was taken upon the sub- 
ject until 1874, when Mayor Cobb, iu his inaugural 
address, alter referring to the authority which 
had been given to the Aldermen in 1867 to take 
1 and for the Court House, said — 

•'The delay which has occurred in acting upon 
the authority thus obtained has been owing to 
the difficulty of selecting a site, and not to any 
difference of opinion as to the necessity for pro- 
viding a new building. The public convenience 
requires a central location; and as valuable laud 



must be taken for the purpose, further delay will 
only serve to increase the expense. As soon as 
other accommodations are furnished for the 
courts, tbe building in Court square ran be ad- 
vantageously connected with the City Hall, and all 
the city officers whom it is now necessary to pro- 
vide with office room at high rents outside of city 
buildings can be accommodated there. As a 
measure of economy, therefore, prompt action 
upon the question "is urgently demanded. It 
should be borne in mind that at least two years 
will be required to complete tbe new building 
after tbe work is authorized; and in the mean- 
time the necessity for additional room will become 
more and more pressing." 

A committee of the Board ot Aldermen was ap- 
pointed to consider the Mayor's' recommendation, 
bur the members were unable to agree upon a 
site; and from that time until the present no ac- 
tion has been taken. 

The statements which I have here quoted, and 
the representations made in the communication 
from Mr. Chief Justice Gray, are such, in my 
opinion, as to make it the duty of the present City 
Government to take steps immediately toward the 
erection of a new Court House. It appears that the 
city is now paying for rent of offics outside of 
City Hall and tbe Court House.but which property 
belong inside of those two buildings, tbe sum ot 
$20,850 per annum, an amount equal to the interest 
on >j420,000. The steady increase in the busi- 
ness of the City Government will necessitate the 
hiring of additional offices from time to time, un- 
less the City Hall is enlarged or a new Court House 
built. The rooms at present occupied by the 
Health Department in the basement ot this build- 
ing arc damp and unhealthy, and might properly 
be complained of by tbe Board of Health on sani- 
tary grounds, if occupied by a family. There are 
a number of other departments ot tbe Govern- 
ment whose accommodations w insufficient and 
unsuitable, but tbey are the best that can be fur- 
nished, unless a large additional annual expense 
is incurred lor outside rents. The initiative in the 
selection of a site for a new building belongs un- 
der the statute of 1807 to the Board of Aldermen 
acting as County Commi-sioners; but I will ven- 
ture to make some suggestions which may be of 
serwee iu detei mining your actiou. 

It appears from what! have already stated that 
the reservoir site, so called, at the rear of the 
State House would have beeu takeu for the pur- 
pose in 1871, had not the Water Board at that time 
reported that the reservoir might be needed again 
for the maiuteuain e of the high-service supply. 
In reply to an inquiry which I addressed to the 
Boston Water Board, alter receiving the commu- 
nication from the Chief Justice, I am informed 
that there is no longer any necessity for maintain- 
ing the lesci voir, either lor the purpose of fur- 
nishing a supply of water for family use or for 
the extinguishment of fires. A copy ot the an- 
swer ot the Water Board and an accompanying 
statement from the acting engineer are appended. 
The land covered by [he reservoir contains .'J8.040 
square feet. The estates on Mt. Vernon street, 
between Temple aud Hancock streets, contain 
24,985 square leet, making the total number of 
feel in the square, bounded by Mt. Vernon, Han- 
cock, Derue and Temple streets, 03,025. The pres- 
ent Court House covers an area of only 12,000 
square leet. 

Tbe Assessors' valuation of the reservoir lot is 
(147,500, and ot the building materials in the reser- 
voir S52,500. The valuation ol the seven estates 
fronting on Alt. Vernon street, including the build- 
ings.is $214,000. From the examinations which have 
been made it would seem to be impossible to se- 
cure sufficient land in any other locality equally 
accessible and equally well adapted for the pur- 
poses of a Court House, without paying three or 
four times the amount for which this site can be 
obtained. The committee of your Board which in- 
vestigated the subject in 1871 said— 

"The heavy granite blocks of which the reser- 
voir is constructed can be worked over and used 
to good advantage in building the foundations 
and basement story of the Court House. It sold 
for removal, this material would be of compara- 
tively little value. The distance fiom the City Hall 
to the centre of this lot is just a quarter of a mile; 
from Pemberton square, by way of Somerset 
street and Ashburton place, it is only about 1000 
feet. The distance for the conveyance of prison- 
ers between the Court House and the Jail would be 
reduced nearly one-half. The grade from Cam- 
bridge street, through Hancock or Temple street, 
to Derne street, is easy. It is only on the wester- 



FE BRU AR Y 11 



1878 



50 



ly and northwesterly side of the hill, that the 
grade is steep; rrom all other points the place is 
accessible and convenient. There is no danger to 
be apprehended from the noise of travel in the 
surrounding streets. There will be a considera- 
ble space between the building and the streets; 
and there is no heavy travel, and never likely to 
be any, through these streets, as none of them are 
regular thoroughfares. The advantages of light 
and air are unsurpassed." 

As soon as the new Court House is built the 
building in Court square can be connected by a 
bridge with the rear of the City Hall, and ample 
accommodations can be furnished there to meet 
all the requirements of the city departments for 
office room during the next fifty yeaVs. It would 
not only be more economical to provide for all the 
city offices in buildings owned by the city, but it 
would be greatly for the convenience of the citi- 
zens to have all the offices brought under the same 
roof, or, what would practicallv amount to the 
same thing, located in adjoining buildings. Be- 
lieving that the city's interests would be injuri- 
ously affected by further delays in providing suit- 
able accommodations for the courts and the offices 
connected with them, I would respectfully recom- 
mend that the communication of the chief justice 
receive your early and favorable consideration. 
Henry L. Pierce, Mayor. 
Boston, Jan. 29, 1878. 

Sir— The Justices of the Supreme Judicial 
Court, after much deliberation, are constrained 
by a sense of their duty to the public to represent 
to your Honor that it is more than ten years since 
the Legislature passed an act to authorize the 
city of Boston to take and hold land for a Court 
House for the County of Suffolk, and that nothing 
has been done toward exercising the authority 
granted by that act. 

That the insufficiency and inconvenience of the 
present Court House are so well known to all who, 
in any capacity, as judges, jurors, counsel, parties 
or witnesses, are obliged to attend the courts, that 
it is unnecessary to enlarge upon them further 
than to say that the constant noise in the surround- 
ing square imposes an excessive strain upon 
the lungs, the ears and the brain of all 
who have to speak or to hear in the court rooms, 
and at times makes it almost impossible to under- 
stand and appreciate what is said, or properly to 
weigh and consider questions, the solution of 
which demands the undisturbed application of 
the utmost powers of the mind, aud concerns the 
most important lights of the citizens. 

That in every year more than half of the ses- 
sions of the full court and of the sittings in equity, 
and a hardly less proportion of the jury trials are 
had in the county of Suffolk, and that the exist- 
ing Court House, in its present situation, is beyond 
all comparison less fit for the purposes to which 
it is applied, than of any court house in the Com- 
monwealth. 

I am with great respect, 

Your most obedient servant, 

Horace Gray, Chief Justice. 

His Honor the Mayor of Boston. 

STATEMENT OF RENTS PAID FOE CITY OFFICES. 

City Solicitor, 2 Pemberton square $1,700.00 

Directors Public Institutions, Registrars of 
Voters, Milk Inspector and Truant Offi- 
cers, 30 Pemberton square 4,000.00 

PaTk Commissioners, N. E. Mutual Life In- 
surance Building, Milk street 900.00 

Improved Sewerage Engineers. 74 Tremont 
street 1,400.00 

License Commissioners, 7 Pemberton 
square 1,250.00 

Total city offices $9,250.00 

RENTS PAID FOR COUNTY OFFICES. 

Probate Building, Tremont street $9,000.00 

Room for jury-waived cases, 39 Court street 2,600.00 

Total county offices $1 1,600.00 

Total city and county $20,850.00 

Value of estates in the square bounded by Mt. 

Vernon, Temple, Derne and Hancock streets: 

Square. Value Value 

Estates. feet. land. build'gs, Total. 

Reservoir lot.... 38,040 $147,500 $52,500 $200,000 

17 Mt. Vernon St.. .3,618 22,000 13,000 35.000 

19 " " ..3,120 14,000 16,000 30.000 

21 " " ..2,880 13,000 7,000 20,000 

23 " •' ..5,838 26,000 18,000 44,000 

25 " " ..3.836 17,000 8.000 25,000 

27 " " ..3,151 15,800 9.200 25,000 

29 " " ..3,033 18,000 17,000 35,000 

Total value of land and buildings $414,000 

Total value, exclusive of reservoir lot. .. 214,000 



On motion of Alderman Slade, the communica- 
tion and accompanying documents were ordered 
printed and referred to the Committee on County 
Buildings. 

POLICE AND LICENSE COMMISSION. 

Report and order in favor of a petition ito the 
Legislature for act to enable the city to establish 
a commission to have charge of the Police De- 
partment and the issuing of licenses was consid- 
ered under unfinished business. The question 
was upon the passage of the order. 

Alderman Harris— I regret that the committee 
have deemed it expedient to report an order ask- 
ing the Legislature for authority tor the city to 
establish a Police Commission. The reasons that 
induced this action I can only conjecture. Com- 
missioners are the supposed panacea for all the 
ills that afflict the city, and I confess I cannot 
comprehend why, it there are evils in the Police 
Department, they cannot be remedied by this 
Board, without saddling new expenses and bur- 
dens upon our overtaxed people. Who is at 
fault? We have a Mayor, honest, courageous; a 
Police Committee, who are not timid men by any 
means, and both Mayor and committee have our 
entire confidence. Now, if corruptions and wrong 
exist, cannot we reach the result of correction by 
and through them ? It was my fortune in December 
last to visit several cities where such commissions 
are in power, and I failed to see any better corps of 
men than those which patrol our streets— aye, far, 
very far, ours are superior. It is said the Chief 
favors a commission — well, if he has a newsystem 
to initiate, cannot our committee obtain the new 
code and put it into operation; at least, cannot 
some steps be taken in that direction? The citi- 
zens of Boston will welcome any improvement, 
and the Mayor and the committee, the Chief and 
all concerned will win popular approval. I object 
first, then, that it is unnecessary, second, that it 
is expensive; and,until we do something ourselves 
and fail, then, in that event only, can I give my 
vote for this new commission. 

Alderman Guild— I had the honor, sir, on be- 
half of the Committee on Ordinances, of 
introducing this order which the gentle- 
man opposes. I regret that I have not taken 
the pains to condense my reasons and argu- 
ments, which I shall offer this evening, into writ- 
ing, as the Alderman has, for by that means I 
might economize time. We are compelled to give 
so large part of our time to the claims of corpora- 
tions which desire to use the streets of Boston, 
that we have but little left for other city business. 
The only prepared part of my speech will be, 
therefore, annotations of a portion of the Mayor's 
address, which I make as I go along. So much of 
the Mayor's address as related to this subject was 
referred to the committee who made this report. 
That committee made a very careful inquiry, and 
I think that some points which I shall give will 
answer every objection made by the Alderman, 
and answer them successfully. The Mayor said — 

'•The condition of the Police Department is not 
altogether satisfactory." 

That is patent to everybody. I do not mean to 
say we do not have as good patrolmen, and good, 
efficient officers. But I mean that the system is 
faulty, that the city suffers thereby, and'that the 
remedy proposed will lessen the expense, promote 
efficiency, make the city better policed, and add 
to its safety, aud put the Mayor in a better posi- 
tion as the executive head of the City Govern- 
ment. 

Under the present system the powers of the 
Mayor, the Board of Aldermen, and the Chief of 
Police are not clearly defined. This has on some 
occasions, we are informed, led to a conflict of 
authority, which is subversive of all discipline in 
a department which depends for its efficiency on 
a high state of discipline. This organization 
should be placed on a more permanent basis. It 
cannot safely be left to the changes which are 
likely to follow from the changes in the annual 
election of those who have it under control. 

Why, sir, a new committee comes in sometimes 
composed of gentlemen perfectly fresh aud inex- 
perienced with regard to city and police matters; 
some of the most important questions relating to 
the discipline aud regulation of the police are 
brought before them for decision. The commit- 
tee will be very lenient one year with regard to 
the organization of the police, and the next year's 
committee very lax in their discipline, and per- 
haps the next year an entire change in this direc- 
tion will take place and the system will be one of 
great severity, or an entire change of policy take 



51 



BOARD OF ALDEHMi; N 



place. In fact, he who is the chief of police— the 
captain of this army of the City Government- 
finds himself with iio settled policy. Why, sir, 
we want in this City Government what every mer- 
chant desires in regard to the administration of 
national affairs— a settled policy; and business 
men g6 so far as to say that if Congress would ad- 
journ and remove the present uncertain state of 
affairs, specie payments would settle themselves. 
So in a degree may it he said respecting certain 
departments of the City Government. A changing 
policy is one that will unsettle the police depart- 
ment. The Mayor tells us— 

"The force as at present constituted consists of 
715 meu. In such a large body changes are con- 
stantly taking place, and the duty ot examining a 
host of applicants for vacancies caused by death, 
resignation or discharge, and of selecting such 
as appear to be qualified tor appointment, de- 
volves upon the Mayor." 

For a lew years past the word "commission" 
seems to be to some persons a sort of red robe to 
a mad bull: a terrible word, indicating infringe- 
ment on the liberties ot the people. The power 
and privileges of the Board of Aldermen and the 
Common Council are going to be taken out ol 
their hands and put iuto the hands of a terrible 
commission, who will draw a line around them- 
selves, and say to all. "llms far shalttbou go 
and no farther." I am not always of that opinion. 
I do not think a commission has been much dis 
advantage, for instance, in the case of 
the Fire Department. And, really, today 
we have a Commission of Police: and 
that is a commission of one-man power, and 
only one, in the City Hall ; and that commission is 
the Mayor. The Mayor examine? and hears all 
police applications, makes the appointments, and 
really the Mayor's voice turns out and displaces 
men on the force. Here comes a man who wishes 
to be appointed upon the police ; the Mayor must 
examine his application, patiently hear his story 
and that of his friends, and read his letter and 
petition; he has to do all that clerical work which 
we should not call upon him, in view of his more 
important duties, to perform. There is scarcely 
a day in the week when you cannot go into his 
office and find an important part of his time taken 
up with examiniug whether some one is compe- 
tent to pertorm the duties ot patrolman at three 
dollars a day. 

Alderman Harris— Why is it, then, that the ap- 
pointments are referred to the Police Committee, 
if the Mayor has absolute power? 

Alderman Guild— In answer to my friend, I will 
say, as I said on a former occasion in the other 
branch, that time presses and he will excuse me 
if I do net allow points to be made out of me for 
the other side by asking me questions. I shall 
permit him to make points without interruption 
when he makes his speech. 

Now, it is proposed to have a commission of 
three expert, experienced men; three men who 
will combine the duties of License and Police 
Commissioners, and the License Commission is 
already in existence. Furthermore I was going 
to say that we absolutely need a Police Commis- 
sion, for the duties that properly belong to such a 
commission are now spread over a variety of 
offices and committees. .Why. sir, you aud I serve 
upon the License Committee today : applications 
come to us for street stands, for pawnbrokers" 
licenses, exhibitions, trucks aud teams and news- 
boys. But we cannot stir a step until we call 
in the Chief of Police to see if it is all 
right before granting permission. It is 
the Chief of Police that really decides; 
it is the Superintendent of Pawn Bro- 
kers who says it is all right with regard to an 
applicant, and it is upon the testimony of police 
officers that the committee grant licenses; but all 
should go into the hands of a Police Commission. 
The Mavor says further— 

"With the best intentions on the part of the 
Committee on Police, the discipline ot the de- 
partment is often seriously injured by the irregu- 
lar methods in which complaints against mem- 
bers of the force are investigated. There is no 
settled policy in regard to the punishments for 
violations of the rules." 

The policy may be one thing today by a commit- 
tee leniently disposed towards the police, aud an- 
other year entirely changed by a committee who 
are martinets, very severe. Furthermore, there 
is no reward for extraordinary skill and vigi- 
lance on the part of police officers; 
no compensation or reward established for 
those who displav courage and unusual zeal in 



the performance of their duties; there is no in- 
centive for a man to be particularly brave or to 
risk his life in the discharge of duty; and there is 
nothing for those who have served faithlully for 
a long time. We have on the Police force men 
who have served for years, but there is no provi- 
sion, not even for a small pension, for those who 
have served honorably and faithfully through all 
their strong life; we cau only sav, You have serv- 
ed us laitlifully, bat are worn out, we have no 
further o&e lor you and you can step aside. This 
is all wrong. 

The License Commission may l>e utilized for 
tbi9 commission of the Police Department; there 
need be no new commission created. In looking 
over the roles and regulations of the Police De- 
partment I have also learned what some ot the 
duties of the captains ot police are. Instead of 
being captains iu charge of a body of men to exe- 
cute orders, they seem to be "mere recording 
clerks. I find they must, among numerous other 
clerical duties, perform the followiug. which I 
read at random : 

"He shall keep a daily account of the regular 
and extra duties done by his men: and on the 
18th of each month submit to the clerk a full 
and accurate account against the name of each 
member ol his station, the number oi days on 
duty," etc 

"He thall receive all money paid tor dog 
licenses,'' etc. ; "shall make out' and collect bills 
for extra service." 'He shall keep a record ol all 
pawnbrokers, drinking saloons.' etc. 

Aud he shall record, keep an account, and make 
out lists of this, that aud the other thing, till 
really a captain of police seems to lie merely a 
recording officer. We ought to have a Police 
Commission that shall have a record kept of all 
suspected places in Bostou, the state of the city, 
condition of streets, etc.. and the captains should 
be merely executive officer? to see that law and 
order are preserved and that the citv is properly 
policed. I might talk upon this subject an hour 
or longer; but I will learn a lesson trom the rail- 
road Hearings, and close by saying that, in addi- 
tion to other obvious advantages, a Police Com- 
mission could purchase supplies for the torce bet- 
ter aud cheaper; could take better care of our 
station houses, and provide in advance for all 
dangers and riots: keep a complete record of the 
condition of the city ; apprise Boards of Health, 
Street Superintendents aud various other depart- 
ments, intelligently and fully, of necessary meas- 
ures' that required immediate action, and thus 
in every way contribute to advance the health 
and safety ot the city. The police should always 
be the Mayor's right arm in enforcing the law, 
and, of course, he should always have power to 
call on them for executive duty. 

So far as my friend refers to the Chief of Police 
being in favor ol this move, I would say, the 
Chief at first informed the committee who inves- 
tigated this matter that he was not very much in 
favor of a commission, but that if an independent 
commission was formed, and if it was necessary 
to discontinue patrolmen enough to pa; the com- 
missioners' salaries, he should say it would so ad- 
vance the efficiency of his torce, and simplify and 
make more effectual the action of the department, 
as to more than compensate for the loss of the 
patrolmen. These are a lew of the rea- 
sons why the committee think the police force 
would be much more effective under the commis- 
sion. It would add not a pent. > i expense to the 
city; but, I have it from theJChief ot Police, quite 
an expense would be saved, i will not advert 
to the evils which may at anytime result from the 
present system, because it is patent to every man 
here, but say only in conclusion, that I deem the 
commission" will be no expense, but a positive 
saving, to the city ot Boston. 

Alderman Viles— I hardly know what to say on 
this order, having so recently been appointed 
chairman of the Committee on Police. If 1 oppose 
the order, it might be considered that I do it on 
the ground that I hate to see the business slip 
from my hand. But I must say that I am not in 
favor of commissions, aud have not been, and 1 
think that, if we have too many of them, we shall 
see bad results, because cities which have them 
would be glad to get rid of them. I believe the 
Police Department is a little demoralized, and has 
been during the past year. The men appointed 
during the past year have seemed to rely upon 
those who got tbem appointed rather than 
upon the Mayor and Chief. The first 
thing when men were appointed, they began to 
wrangle about what station they should go to, 



FEB RU ARY 11 



1878 



52 



and if a man was assigned to a station where 
there was a vacancy, and he did not like it, his 
friends would get him assigned to some other 
station, where they wanted him, and still leaving 
the vacancy When the last municipal year ex- 
pired there were more men at Station 2 than 
there were routes for. Some five or six men were 
appointed last December to fill vacancies in the 
outlying stations, and the Chief, in his wis- 
dom, assigned them to those stations; but 
before they got there they came with an 
order from the Mayor assigning them to 
Station 2, where we found four, 1 tbink, without 
routes. Since that term expired the Chief has 
sent them to outlying stations where tbere were 
vacancies, and some of those men have been to 
me to get assigned back ; but the Chief knows best 
where those men belong, and the present com- 
mittee will sustain him. I don't think the Chief 
was sustained by the committee or the Mayor the 
past year; he has been between the two, as it 
were, and I must say the discipline has n't been 
what it should be. I believe that we have inaugu- 
rated some new systems that will be beneficial, and 
you can already see the effect on the men in 
the streets. The captains say there has not been so 
good discipline for some time. We discharged an 
officer from one station, and it has had a good ef- 
fect. The committee do not propose to sit an 
hour a week whitewashing the cases of men who 
go into drinking places and get drunk ; and if the 
men do not do their duty they must expect the 
consequences. They carry the rules and regula- 
lations in their pockets and can read them. We 
expect them to live up to them, and we shall hold 
them responsible for carrying them out. I do not 
believe a commission will be for the best interest 
of the city, and I cannot vote for it tonight. 

Alderman Perkins— The remarks of the chair- 
man of the Committee on Ordinances meets my 
hearty approval, and I trust this Board will 
unanimously adopt the recommodations contain- 
ed in the order. The chief objections which I 
have heard urged against commissions are that 
bad men might be fastened upon the Government ; 
that commissions were, in a measure, independent 
of the City Government, and that the rights of 
Aldermen and Councilmen— which, to some gen- 
tlemen, seem peculiarly dear— might be taken 
away. But, sir, the same rule will hold good in re- 
gard to a Committee on Police or to a Mayor. If we 
have a bad or a weak Mayor and a weak Commit- 
tee on Police, we have a weak administration of 
the affairs committed to their charge. Certainly 
no gentleman at this Board will say that the effi- 
ciency of the Fire Department has not been im- 
measurably augmented since the new administra- 
tion of affairs was inaugurated. I have not the. 
slightest doubt that if this City Council will get 
authority to establish this commission, some im- 
provement in police affairs will follow. I trust 
the order will pass. 

Alderman Slade--I must enter my protest 
against commissions, and I am sorry to disagree 
with our excellent Mayor and the committee in 
their views upon this matter; but I must do so. 
I don't know what the Mayor and Aldermen are 
elected for, if they are not here to do this very 
work that they propose to put upon somebody 
else. We stand here directly from the people, 
and we are placed here by the suffrages of the 
people to do this very work that we propose to 
put in the hands of somebody else who is not 
so intimately and closely connected with the 
people as we are. I believe the closer to the 
people that all matters pertaining to the city are 
kept, the better for us all and the better for the 
police it will be. I believe that the police are to- 
day and will be more efficient under the eye of 
the Mayor and this Board than they will it they 
are thrust one side and put under the eye of a 
commission. The committee propose to put the 
police and the issuing of licenses into the hands 
of a commission, and I don't believe that the peo- 
ple will sanction it. I don't believe that Boston 
people will go with us in that direction at 
all. The members of the Board ana the 
Common Council are known mostly to the 
people in the different sections from which 
they come, and we can be and are approached 
much more freely by the people than a commis- 
sion possibly could be. I don't believe in com- 
missions, and I would rather do a good deal to get 
rid of one or two or three that we have than to 
have any more. I don't agree with my friend on 
my left in regard to the Fire Commission. I be- 
lieve that if those three commissioners were re- 
moved the department would go on just as well as 



it is now, and that the Chief Engineer and his as- 
sistants could manage it just as well as the com- 
mission can. For my part, I cannot see what this 
Fire Commission has to ao. I don't believe 
that we will be justified or backed up by the peo- 
ple when we put any more of the work of the city 
into the hands of commissions. The Mayor and 
Aldermen are the proper persons to do this work. 
The chairman of the committee says that it will 
rectify weak spots. If there are any weak spots, 
let them be remedied, no matter whom it hits. As 
to the examinatioD of the different applicants, 
there wont probably be more than twenty-five or 
thirty changes in that department this year; there 
were not more than that last year, and 
certainly it wont be a very hard matter 
for the Mayor and the Committee on 
Police to make this selection. There will 
be plenty of names to select from. I am sorry 
this matter has been brought up here. I have 
looked it over pretty carefully, as I have every 
commission, and 1 am aware that there are other 
things to follow this, in the way of commissions, 
that I shall strongly object to, and I hope they 
wont come. I have seen ia the papers of there 
being a petition signed to have the horse railroads 
put into the hands of commissioners. Now, to- 
night, twelve of us have listened to a request for a 
location by a horse railroad ; it has been- 
referred to a committee of three selected from 
this Board to look the route over and see if every- 
thing is all right, and that it can be done as well 
as not, and report back to us. Here is the place 
to settle such matters: they belong to the people, 
and we belong to the people much more than the 
commissions do. I am not scared at the men- 
tion of commissions, but they remove matters so 
much farther from the people, and I don't like 
them. I understand from a gentleman from New 
York that the people there are trying to get the city 
business from the hands of the commissions back 
into their own hands; they have been robbed and 
cheated until they desire to get them back into 
their hands again. You get a commission ap- 
pointed and it is the hardest thing to kill in the 
world. I hope we shall not move one step in that 
direction. 

Alderman Guild— A word or two more. The 
gentleman refers to the Police Committee as now 
constituted. But we don't know what the Police 
Committee will be that will come ofter this one. 
Certainly the record of the Fire Commission 
shows that it has been a success. I merely place 
before you the facts. Here is the Chief of Police, 
who would be the last man. I should say, who 
would want a Police Commission appointed ; and 
yet he has freely given evidence in its favor. The 
police should be removed from all taint of political 
influences. It is not now so removed. Political 
influence may be brought to bear by an official 
upon the Chief to appoint or displace' a man. At 
a certain station the regulation may be pretty- 
strict, and an inefficient man may not like it very 
well ; he goes to his friends in the Board of 
Aldermen or Common Council and gets himself 
transferred from Station 1 to Station 7. S or 10, 
and snaps his fingers at his old officer and says, 
I have outwitted you, and Alderman This or 
Councilman That has got me transferred. The 
police should be removed as far as possible 
from all such influences, which interfere with 
discipline. They ought to be perfectly free 
from them. A board of police commissioners 
should be appointed that would have a record of 
every part of the city, as is done in the city of 
Paris. They should know every disreputable 
place and every place where liquor is sold, where 
gambling or other illegal practices take place, and 
should enforce the laws of Boston, which are not 
strictly enforced to-day. I think the Government 
could hold such a commission responsible for the 
enforcement of the law. We do not throw all the 
supervision of these commissioners out of our 
power. I hold that an ordinance might be framed 
by which a Police Commission would be sub- 
ordinate to the Mayor of Boston, and any 
one of them could be removed for cause. 
They should be under him. and the Chief 
of Police should be to this body of men what the 
colonel is to a regiment. There is today no esprit 
du corps amoug the police as there is among the 
firemen, and l"do not think there is the "same 
efficiency. Oar present Police Committee may be 
very efficient; but you don't know what wo may 
get next year. Talk about the people in elections! 
It is too often the case that it is the man that can 
spend the most money and furnish the most wh's- 
key that will control an election, while the people 



53 



HOARD OF ALDERMKJN 



wake up too late to And tBeniselves deceived, aud 
that they must wait a year to repair damages. 
We know that. It is no use talking about this 
grand popular business. Let us put this department 
out of the reach of danger. We know what has 
been done in one year, and what an effort had to be 
made by the people against politieians, to prevent 
Boston' from going where New York has gone, 
not on account of commissions, but of politicians 
who managed the commissions. If we enact any 
measure of salety, let us do it today. Such a set 
of commissioners would learn, from long experi- 
ence, how to appoint an excellent police force, 
good efficient officers. Our committee very often 
appoint a man because he is a good man ; he has 
been a porter in Mr. Bullion's store, gets down at 
six o'clock every morning, never stole anything, 
goes to church twice on Sunday; has been in Mr. 
Bullion's store rive years; Mr. Bullion rec- 
ommends him; he "is appointed, and yet 
proves to be one of the poorest officers 
on the force from non-adaptability. Take men 
who become thoroughly experienced in looking 
up men suitable for police duty ; who are experts 
in detecting crime and in keeping those records, 
and who superintend the duties of the police, the 
License Commissioners and the committee; cen- 
tralize that power and you will make it more ef- 
fectual aud powerful, and make your city better 
governed; in fact, more desirable to live in. 

Alderman Slade — lam sorry the Alderman has 
so little confidence in the people; I have a great 
deal more than he has. I am sorry if our Chief of 
Police has n't got backbone enough to stand up 
and organize his force, as a good officer of a bat- 
talion would do as commander iu chief; and if he 
has not backbone enough to do that, put some- 
body there who has it. It theie is any fault any- 
where, as has been suggested, perhaps it is in the 
Chief. I don't know; 1 don't say there is ; I have 
nothing at all against the Chief. When they find 
three or lour men in a statiou who are not needed 
there, if he stands up and does his duty, the people 
will stand by him. and no Mayor will ever dare to 
attempt to set aside or discharge the Chief for 
doing his duty in that respect. The better a man 
does his duty, the better the people like him; and 
as to being afraid of politicians, I don't care one 
cent about it. If a member of this Board should 
ask something of the Chief that ought not to be 
granted, the Chief would be to blame if he don't 
stand up and reiuse it. If we ha\e a proper 
Chief, deputy and clerks and captains, lieutenants 
and sergeants, and the police are not organized 
something like a military regiment, the principal 
fault will come back upon the Chief. That is the 
case with every battalion I ever knew in the world ; 
for where the commander is right, the whole body 
is right. I don't wish to be understood as reflect- 
ing upon the Chief of Police; but I say this mat- 
ter can be cured better by committees than by 
commissions, which can berun by rum and poli- 
ticians better than anybody else. 

Alderman Yiles— One word in relation to our 
Chief, He has the backbone, and will do his duty 
it he is sustained by the Mayor and committee. 
But he is bound to honor the order which a politi- 
cian brings from the Mayor. It has been done 
and it will be done. 

Alderman Guild — There is the abuse; and it has 
been done; and that is the answer to my friend 
opposite. A man may have all the backbone he 
desires, but his backbone will be broken by the 
superior officer. 

Alderman Slade — I wonder if a commission's 
backbone cannot be brokon in that way. 

Alderman Guild — I don't think it is as easy to 
break three men's backbones as it is to break one. 

Alderman Slade— I think it is. But, Mr. Chair- 
man, we may have had a Mayor who has done just 
what has been suggested ; if'we have had a Mayor 
of that kind, one year is long enough for him to 
stay here. 1 don't think we have got one, and I 
am afraid the Alderman is putting it a little thick 
upon the other. 

Alderman Guild — I am not aware of putting it 
thick upon anybody. 

Alderman McLean— I did n't propose to say a 
word, but this seems to be an important question, 
and as I am never afraid to make my record I 
desire to say that the recommendation of the 
Mayor and the committee meets my cordial com- 
mendation. The report has been so heartily sup- 
ported and fully explained by the chairman of the 
committee that it is hardly necessary for me to 
say a word. 1 believe it will make the govern- 
ment of the police more stable and regular. As 
the chairman says, we may not always have 



such a Committee on Police as we have this 
year, and he is trying to provide for those occa- 
sions. In the second place, it is a fact that the 
police are subject to political influences; they 
know it and feel if. I have had it stated tome 
by some of the best policemen on the force that 
they were kfraid of their bread and butter in cer- 
tain localities, and that they did n't dare to do 
their duty as they desired, for the simple reason 
that they would suffer for it; and the consequence 
was they were compelled to wink at viola- 
tions of the law. I believe a commission 
would be more economical. If we were going to 
add any more expenses to the city I would n't 
care to advocate it; but 1 believe the commission 
is going to keep down the expense. We will not 
have a new commission, for the present license 
commission can be turned into a Dolice commis- 
sion. 

Alderman Harris— Would there be any need of 
a license commission if the Legislature should 
enact a ptohibitory law? 

Alderman McLean— I have nothing to say what 
they may or may not do; but I have no doubt the 
duties or the police can be performed better and 
be more tree from political influences under a 
commission than otherwise. It is within the 
knowledge of every man at this Board that the 
Police Department were interfered with, that 
their favor might be bad; and how do we know 
but that thing will take place another year? I 
am heartily iu favor of this report, and shall vote 
for the order. 

Alderman Slade called for the yeas and nays 
and the order was passed — yeas 8, nays 4. 

Yeas— Aldermen Faunce, Guild, Hayden, Mc- 
Lean, Perkins, Stebbins. Whidden, Wbiton— 8. 

Nays— Aldermen Harris, Robinson, Slade, Viles 
—4, 

Subsequently a motion to reconsider was made 
by Alderman Guild, hoping it would not prevail. 
Alderman Harris called for the yeas and nays 
and the motion was lost — yeas 4, nays 0, the Al- 
dermen voting relatively the same as before. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS PBOU THE COMMON 
COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Auditor's exhibit. Feb. 1,1878, of the state of the 
several appropriations. (City documental.) Placed 
on tile. 

Request of directors of East Boston ferries for 
an appropriation for a new ferry boat, and for 
.leave to sell alt old boat. Referred to Committee 
on Ferries in concurrence. 

Request of directors of East Boston ferries for 
authority to contract for fuel, to be paid for in 
the next financial year. Referred to Committee 
on Ferries in concurrence. 

Annual report of City Registrar. Placed on tile. 

Report recommending the election of John 
Oalvin as Superintendent of Common— with a 
minority report in favor of the election of Wil- 
liam Doogue to that position. Accepted in con- 
currence. 

Alderman Slade moved to proceed to a ballot, 
and on motion of Alderman Perkins the matter 
was laid on the table. 

order for Board of Health to furnish an esti- 
mate of the cost of abating the nuisance on the 
Mill Pond flats at Charlestown. Passed in concur- 
rence. 

Order to allow the bill of P. H. Rogers, $8.50, 
chargeable to "Sewers." Passed in concurrence. 

Order to display flags and ring the bells of the 
city on Washington's birthday. Passed in con- 
currence—yeas 12, nays 0. 

Report and order for a transfer of $359.17 from 
appropriation for Fever Hospital, Gallop's Island, 
to that for Quarantine Department. Order passed 
in concurrence— yeas 12. nays 0. 

Ordinance to amend the ordinance in relation to 
printing, so that the Mayor shall appoint, subject 
to the approval of the City Council, a superin- 
tendent of printing for a term of three years. 
Passed in concurrence. 

REPORTS OF CITY OFFICERS. 

(My Clerk. Report for quarter ending Jan. 31, 
1878. Receipts $1121.50, which have been paid to 
Collector. Sent down. 

/■'ire Commissioners. Report of fires and alarms 
for January. Sent down. 

Commissi a it i rs on Sinking Funas. A report 
was received from the Sinking Fund Commission- 
ers naming the following amounts required to be 
paid to them from taxation on Dec. 1, 1878, to pro- 
vide for the sinking funds; Burnt District Sink- 
ing Fund, $146,698; new Sinking Fund, $310,749; 



FEBRUARY 11. 1878. 



ft4 



Cochituate Water Sinking Fund, $207,456. Total 
taxation required for the sinking Kinds, §664,903. 
Sent down. 

NEW SYSTEM OJb' BOOKKEEPING. FOR "WATER DE- 
PARTMENT. 

A communication was received from the Boston 
Water Board calling attention to the recommenda- 
tions in their annual report of -May 1, 1877, in re- 
gard to opening a new set of books, and request- 
ing authority to spend $500 for the services of an 
expert accountant and other temporary assistance 
in opening such a set of books as is therein recom- 
mended. 

Alderman Wbiton— The Committee on Water- 
have substantially had that matter before them. 
At a meeting the other day the chairman of the 
Water Board was before them and made an ex- 
planation to the same effect as that communica- 
tion, and the committee were pretty well satisfied 
that what they ask for ought to be granted. They 
have found that the system of keeping the ac- 
counts of the department has been very defective 
indeed, and that it can be improved very much to 
their advantage and that of the city of Boston. 
Last year theCommittee on Retrenchment cut down 
the fund with which they oroposea to pay for the 
services of their clerk, sothat they have none left, 
and tney wish the money to perfect the system. 
They wish to prepare the books and get all ready 
for the commencement of the next financial year, 
and I have an order which I will offer in connec- 
tion witb that communication : 

Oi dered— That the Boston Water Board be au- 
thorized to expend a sum not exceeding §500 for 
the temporary employment of an expert account- 
ant and other assistants in providing a new sys- 
tem of bookkeeping for that department; the ex- 
pense to be charged to the appropriation for 
Water. 

On motion of Alderman Whiton the order was 
read twice and put upon its passage. 

Alderman Whidden said he was engaged and 
dirt not hear the explanation. 

Alderman Whiton — The Water Board have not 
a clear system of keeping their accounts. The 
communication referred to a report of theirs 
which is found in City Doc. 75 of last year, in 
which they say — 

" The board has been considering a plan for the 
reorganization of the Water Department, that 
they hope after a while to be able to carry out, 
and which they believe will be an improvement, 
at least so far as the division of labor is con- 
cerned, and the equalization of compensation for 
the services of employes. They desire, also, to 
make such a change in the manner of keeping 
accounts as will enable them at all times to know, 
by books kept at their office at City Hall, very 
nearly the condition of all work done or being 
done in any branch of the department. Under 
the present system the accounts are kept in books 
at the various offices, but they are not reported 
daily, and made a part of the system such as it 
seems to the board is needful to keep them prop- 
erly informed of the daily operations of the work- 
ing force, and cost of the work it may be engaged 
upon. The distribution of materials, the labor 
expended upon any particular piece of work, the 
cost and disposal of tools, as well as the gross 
amount of expenditure, should, in the judgment 
ot the board, be shown in a set of regularly bal- 
anced books Kept by an experienced accountant 
at their office." 

One can readily understand that there is a 
chance for a good system of bookkeeping by 
which all these points can be obtained, and they 
not be obliged to hunt through a series of books 
for any parricular item. The present clerk is so 
clo'ely confined that, even if he had the ability to 
do it in the best manner, he could not arrangethe 
books at the present time, as the labor of keep- 
ing the records of settling up the Sudbury River 
land damages takes up all his time. An expert 
could inaugurate the system and carry it on till 
such time as the clerk can take hold of it 
and carry it on himself. Any one con- 
versant with the intricacies ot bookkeeping knows 
there are as many different systems as there are 
different, kinds ot accounts'. The chairman of 
the board made it appear to the committee that 
the present system was to be deplored and might 
be made much better, and that the expenditure 
would be quite small compared with the benefits 
to he obtained. 

Alderman Whidden — I am satisfied with the ex- 
planation. Without it $500 seemed to be a pretty 
large sum to spend for that purpose. 

The order was passed. Sent down. 



LICENSESV 

Alderman Guild submitted reports from the 
Committee on Licenses as follows: 

Minors' Applications Granted— Twenty news- 
boys. 

Street Stand Licensed— Richard Fitzgerald, to 
stand a wheelbarrow or handcart at 101 West 
Brookline street. 

Wagon License Granted— John F. Simpson, 225 
E street. 

Amusement License Granted— Thomas F. Dro- 
han, to give an athletic entertainment at Beet- 
hoven Hall, provided it shall be subject to the su- 
pervision ot the Police Department. 

Pawnbrokers and Dealers in Second-hand Arti- 
cleslicensed— \V. A. Pollard, 25 Howard street, and 
George W. Watson, 46V 2 Howard street. 

Pawnbroker Licensed — J. A. Palmer, HjPember- 
ton square. 

Severally accepted. 

CONTRACT FOR WATER PIPE. 

Alderman Whiton submitted a report from the 
Committee on Water, on request of the Boston 
Water Board for authority to contract for addi- 
tional water pipe, recommending the passage of 
an order— That the Boston Water Board be au- 
thorized to contract for the delivery of the cast- 
iron pipes required for the ordinary work of the 
Water Department during the next financial year; 
the amount of said contract, not exceeding $55,000, 
to be paid from the appropriation to be made for 
the Cochituate Water Department for the finan- 
cial year 1878-79. Read twice and passed. Sent 
down. 

PERMITS FOR STABLES. 

Alderman Viles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Health on the part of the Board in 
favor of granting permits to occupy stables by P. 
H. Henderson, on Orchard street ; Thomas Don- 
nelly, on Ashland street; Lorin Clark, on Adams 
street, near Milton street, Ward 24. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

PROJECTING SIGN REFUSED. 

Alderman Viles submitted a report from the 
Committee on Police ot leave to withdraw on pe- 
tition of J. Irvin Carr & Co. for leave to suspend a 
flag across School street at No. 22. Accepted. 

MARKET. 

Alderman Slade submitted reports from the 
Committee on Market recommending approval of 
transfer of cellar of stall 13, Faneuil Hall Market, 
by C. T. Dunn to W. J. Griggs, and of lease of 
same cellar by W. J. Griggs to David S. Coolidge. 
Severally acceptea. 

PUBLIC PARKS. 

A report and order came down to transfer from 
the Reserve Fund $25,000 to appropriation for 
"Public Park, Back Bay," to meet the expense of 
filling, grading, etc. Order passed in concur- 
rence — yeas 12, nays 0. 

A report and order came down to authorize the 
Park Commissioners to purchase two and eight- 
tenths (2 8-10) acres at Longwood entrance of 
Back Bay Park, also to purchase land to continue 
the Beacon-street entrance down to the Charles 
River. Referred to the Committee on Finance in 
concurrence. 

Alderman Guild submitted the following: 

The Joint Special Committee on Public Parks, to 
whom was refeired so much of the Mayor's inau- 
gural address as relates to the improvement of the 
Back Bay Park and Charles River embankment, 
having carefully considered the subject, beg leave 
to sub ci it the following as a report in part: The 
committee are of the opinion that it is important 
that the city should obtain possession of the flats 
in Charles River, extending from Canal Bridge 
to the junction of Brookline avenue and 
Beacon street, in order that the water 
front of the city in that direction may 
be kept open both for sanitary reasons and for 
purposes of ornamentation. Endeavors have al- 
ready been made by private parties to obtain con- 
trol of these flats tor various purposes, which, if 
successful, will destroy the great natural advan- 
tages of the locality, depreciate the value of tax- 
able property in the vicinity, and effectually pre- 
vent the utilization ot the river front ior public 
purposes. The committee believe that the city 
should endeavor to protect its interests in this 
directiou, aud to that end we respectfully recom- 
mend the passage of the following order: 

Ordered, That bis Honor the Mayor be request- 
ed to petition the General Court lor the cession 
by the Commonwealth to the city of Boston of the 
strip of flats on Charles River .beginning at the 



55 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



southerly end of Canal Dridge and extending to 
the Harbor Commissioners' line, near the junc- 
tion of Brookline avenue and Beacon street. 

Alderman Faunae said there was some hurry 
about getting this matter betore the Legislature, 
and he moved that the order take its second read- 
ing. 

Alderman Harris— I would like to know what 
expense this is going to involve the city in. It 
will put our feet in pretty deep when we take all 
that wharf property, up to Brookline avenue, and 
any one who has been there knows there is con- 
siderable property there that has to be purchased. 
As I understand, this petition is for the right to 
take it. 

Alderman Faunce— No, sir. 

Alderman Harris -Then I misunderstand it. 

Alderman Guild — It is no expense to the city. 
It is simply to ask to cede those flats to the city. 
As we are now, we are utterly unprotected. If 
the Coiumouwealth should choose to till up those 
flats to the Harbor Commissioners' line, it would 
come very near to the Beacon-street coping of the 
wall there, and also very uear to the Charles 
River shore. A railroad corporation might get a 
right to ruu over that land, which would belong 
to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and ruin 
the property that belongs to citizens of Boston. 
If we can get the Commonwealth to cede that to 
us, and keep it open for sanitary reasons, and 
never drop an ounce of tilling there, it will be a 
protection to the city to have it in its own hands. 
It is no expense to the city. 

Alderman Harris— I think the gentleman labors 
under some misapprehension. Certainly the State 
owns no Mats from Leverett-street Bridge to Cam- 
bridge Bridge. 

Alderman Guild— It was so stated by the Mayor 
in his inaugural address, and was so stated to the 
committee. 1 have a plan here which I will show 
the gentleman. Of course I would not ask the 
Commonwealth to cede anything to us that 
does n't belong to tnem. 

Alderman Harris— If the gentleman has thor- 
oughly investigated it, he knows better than I do, 
perhaps. 

Alderman (iuild— To make it more intelligible, 
i t is simply the flats behind Beacon street and 
Charles street. It is represented that they belong 
to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and we 
simply want to get them ceded to the city. 

Alderman McLean— Is there not some expense 
attached to this in the future? Is n't there to be 
an expensive retaining wall'.' OI course, if we 
have the flats ceded to us, as a consequence we 
shall be called upon to expend a good deal of 
money. 

Alderman Guild — I do not so understand it. The 
petition is tor the State to cede the flats without 
any condition. This effort was made last year. 
The State may put in some condition; we are not 
obliged to accept it. The effort is made under the 
plea that we desire to nrotect ourselves. We de- 
sire that the whole of this water front, which 
they now own, should remain open as a protection 
to the city. It is well known that a member of the 
House of Representatives has urged the filling up 
of this portion to allow a railroad corporation to 
run around in the rear of Beacon and Charles 
streets into the countn . 

Aldermau Viles— Has this anything to do with 
the contemplated park? 

Alderman Guild— Certainly it has.'.it the City 
Government will authorize it. There is a little 
strip of land down there which will make a 
pretty portion of the park if the City Govern- 
ment wants it. But independent ot the park, if 
no nark was contemplated, I should feel author- 
ized to introduce this order simply from the 
danger to the city of Boston, as an order has 
been introduced into the Legislature for fill- 
ing up these flats by the State, and the 
project has beeu defeated by Boston influence; at 
least so I have been informed during the investi- 

f?tions of this committee. *Vere there no park, 
should feel that I had the best interests of the 
citizens of Boston at heart by moving in tnis mat- 
ter. There is no cat in the meal. 

Alderman McLean— I have no doubt it is all 
open and above board; nevertheless, I have the 
feeling that this is the entering wedge to a large 
expenditure in the future. It would be very easy 
to say that the City Government accepted this tor 
the sole purposes of a park. 

Alderman Guild— Not unless the State put that 
into the condition. 

Alderman McLean— 1 am opposed to these large 
expenditures for park purposes in every direction, 



and wnile this may be proper, I desire to prevent 
the city from going into any of those large 
schemes that have been laid out by the Park Com- 
missioners. It this is one of them, I would rather 
have a little more time to look it over. I know it 
is very easy to say that this does n't cost any- 
thing. 

Alderman Faunce withdrew the motion fin- a 
second reading, and the order went over. 
CONSOLIDATION OF BARBOB MA8TEB ami iiak- 
BOK POLICE. 

Alderman Perkins submitted a report in part 
from the joint special committee appointed to as- 
certain ami report what changes can be made in 
the duties now performed by the Harbor Master, 
police and fire boats with a view to the consolida- 
tion thereof, that in their opinion it is desirable 
and expedient that the duties performed by the 
Harbor Master and Captain of the Harbor Police 
be consolidated, and witt that view they recom- 
mend the passage of an order— That chapter 64 
ot the acts of the Legislature of 1802, entitled An 
act concerning the Harbor Master of Boston, be " 
and the same hereby is accepted by the city of 
Boston. Bead once. 

ORDBB i" PAY. 

Alderman Perkins, from the Committee on 
Streets on the part of the Hoard, submitted an or- 
der to pay George Saner S400 for land taken and 
damages occasioned by the laying out ot Ward 
street. Read twice and passed." 

ELECTION hi SUPERINTENDENT OK STREETS. 

Alderman Whldden submitted the following: 

The joint special committee appointed to nom- 
inate a Superintendent of Streets, who have re- 
ported iu favor ot the reelection of Charles Har- 
ris, and to whom has since been referred the re- 
monstrance of Gardner Warren against the re- 
election of said Harris to that office, would re- 
spectfully report that they have given the remon- 
strants a hearing, and that in their opinion the 
several allegations in said remonstrance have not 
been sustaiued. 

The report was accepted. Sent down. 

On motion of Alderman Whidden, the election 
of a Superintendent ot Streets was taken up. 

The Chairman read a request from Lawrence D. 
Welby ct al., that the election of Superintendent 
of Streets be postponed until after the perusal of 
a commnuication and accompanying statement 
submitted to the Mayor today. 

Alderman Perkins said the committee gave the 
remonstrants a patient hearing, and ample oppor- 
tunity had been given to impeach the character 
of the Superintendent; but all the charges bad 
been disproved. 

Alderman Whidden made a similar statement 
and read letters from ex-Alderman N. C. Nash 
and Warren Gardner, adding that every opportu- 
nity had been given to every one to make their 
statement. 

The election proceeded, and Charles Harris re- 
ceived twelve votes and was declared elected. 
Sent down. 

KKSIGXATION. 

Alderman Perkins said he would have to be ab- 
sent from the city for some time on ac- 
count of ill health, and tendered his resignation 
as a member of the Committee on Health, which 
the Board accepted, and Alderman Harris was 
appointed to fill the vacancy. 

SUPERINTENDENTS OU BBIDOB8. 

Alderman Harris offered an order— Thar the 
Committee on Bridges be requested to nominate 
suitable candidates for superintendents of 
bridges partly controlled by the city ol Boston. 
Passed. 

Alderman McLean in the chair. 

MASSAi 111 SETTS CUAlilTAllLE MECHANIC ASSO- 
CIATION. 

Alderman Stebbins stated that he had beeu re- 
quested to present, and did present, a petition 
from a committee of the Board of Government of 
the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Associa- 
tion for the city to obtain legislative authority to 
grant them leave to use a portion ot the parade 
ground for their next exhibition ; and in the event 
of a refusal by the city, to select some other place 
within the city proper. 

Alderman Stebbins— I stated very frankly to 
the member of the committee who brought this 
petition to my attention, that I shared the senti- 
ments of those who opposed the granting of the 
Common for that purpose last year, and I should 
feel bound to oppose making the application to 



FEBRUARY 11 



18 7 8 



56 



the Legislature to obtain the necessary authority 
to give the association permission to hold the ex- 
hibition upou the Common. In the course of the 
conversation it was suggested that possibly there 
might be other locations where sufficient land 
could be obtained to enable the association to 
give such an exhibition hs they desire, and among 
other lots brought to their attention was that 
owned by the city near the Providence depot. It 
is somewhat irregular in shape, but still, per- 
haps, it is well adapted for the purposes for 
which they desire a lot. In the immedi- 
ate vicinity, connected with this lot, is 
a public schoolhouse of ten rooms, belong- 
ing to the city, and it has been suggested that 
possibly, if the ute of that building could be ob- 
tained, 'and the city should grant the use of the 
land belonging to it, the association might be en- 
couraged to erect a costly budding and would 
give one of their exhibitions, which have been a 
source of much profit to them in the past, and 
also great credit to the city of Boston. It 
is with a view of ascertaining . whether 
location cannot be made available for the pur- 



poses of the association that I shall move the ref- 
erence of tne petition to a joint special commit- 
tee of three on the part of the Board, with such 
as the Council may join, to take the whole 
subject into consideration, for it is certainly 
desirable to encourage this association to 
give an exhibition cluiiDg the coming 
season, if possible. As you are all aware, these 
exhibitions have reflected great credit upon the 
association, and bring large numbers of people to 
the city, and I have no doubt that if one could be 
given this year it will be of treat benefit to the 
association and the city. As there seems to be no 
joint standing committee to whom the petition 
can be properly referred, and as it concerns mat- 
ters which are in charge of several committees of 
the City Government, I move the reference of the 
petition with a view of thoroughly investigating 
the whole matter. 

The motion prevailed, and Aldermen Stebbins, 
Hayden and Whidden were appointed on said 
comuiittee. Sent down. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Stebbins. 



57 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY 14, 1878. 



Regular meeting at IV., o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Pope, President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Sundry petitions were referred in concurrence. 

A petition of the Massachusetts Charitable Me- 
chanic Association, for leave to erect a temporary 
building on the Common, and in case of refusal 
for the City Council to select some suitable site, 
came down referred to a joint special committee. 
Concurred, and Messrs. Burke of Ward '_', Clapp 
of Ward 14, Colby of Ward 18, Taylor of Ward 16, 
and Smith of Ward 9 were joined to said com- 
mittee. 

Report of fires and alarms for January and City 
Clerk's quarterly report. Severally placed on rile. 

Communication from Commissioners on link- 
ing Funds, that the amount of taxation required 
tor said funds tor the coming financial year will 
be $664,903. Placed on tile. 

Request of Boston Water Board for an allow- 
ance to effect a new system of bookkeeping. 
Placed on tile. 

Order for an expenditure notexceeding $500 for 
temporary employment of an expert accountant 
and other assistance lor the Boston Water Board. 
Ordered to a second reading. 

Report and order for contract to he made for 
rtelivery/.of cast-iron pipes to the Water Depart- 
ment for next financial year at not exceeding 
655,000. 

.Mr. Wilson of Ward 20 said it was important for 
the Water Board to make this contract immedi- 
ately. It takes considerable time to make the 
pipe, and it was necessary to begin early, that the 
work of the department may not be delayed in 
the spring. On motion of Mr. Wilson, the rule 
was suspended and the order was read a second 
time and passed in concurrence. 

Certificate of appointment of Alderman Harris 
on Committee on Health, vice Alderinau Perkins. 
Placed on tile. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

A report came down of committee on remon- 
strance of G. Warren against the election ol the 
present Superintendent of Streets; that the com- 
mittee have given the remonstrant a hearing, and 
the allegations in said remonstrance have not 
been sustained. Accepted in concurrence. 

Certificate of election of Charles Harris as Su- 
perintendent of Streets. Placed on file. An elec- 
tion was ordered. Committee — Messrs. Shepard 
of Ward 1, Sawyer of Ward 18, Iv'ason of Ward 17. 

Whole number of votes r>4 

Necessary to a choice 28 

Charles Harris had 62 

Henry Wilson 1 

Stephen A. Tarbell 1 

And Mr. Harris was elected in concurrence. 

POLICE AND LICENSE COMMISSION. 

A report and order came aown for the Mayor 
to petition the Legislature for authority to estab- 
lish a commission to have cnarge of "the Police 
Department and the issuing ot licenses. 

The question was on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2— I notice that this ques- 
tion gave rise to some discussion in the Board ot 
Aldermen, who were divided as to the expediency 
of passing this order. From my past course it 
is pretty well understood that I am opposed to 
commissions in any form, the same quest.on hav- 
ing been up last Thursday evening iu regird to 
second Assistant Assessors, although that was 
not in the form of a commission. I certainly can- 
not see what advantage it will be to establish 
a commission. The present commissions of 
three cost about $12,000 a year apiece, and there 
is considerable extra clerk hire attending them. 
That is one reason I oppose them; but the princi- 
pal reason is because I fail to see why the citizens 
of Boston are willing to surrender their rights to 
any department of the City Government. I have 
my doubts whether the citizens of Boston are 
willing to give up their rights to any department 
in the City Government; and this wholesale put- 
ting of every department under a commission is 
certainly nothing more or less than giving up the 



rights of the people of Boston . There appears to be 
au effort this year to turu every department into 
a commission, and what is to be left for the City 
Government to do? If it is necessary for the Al- 
dermen to give their whole time to the interests 
of the city, I should vote for the order of the gen- 
tleman from Ward 9 to pay them a salary, and 
thus let the people say who shall be elected on the 
commission. A great deal has been said about 
rings in City Hall last year, but it seems to me 
that City Hall is about to be made into 
a permanent ring this year. When four or five 
departments are consolidated into commissions, 
what have t^ie people the right to appeal to? I 
am a member of the Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment, and I know what strength I have. I don't 
amount to a bagatelle on that committee. It 
don't make any difference what report I make in 
retard to a subject, an examination from the 
commission on that department would over- 
rule any report I might make. If this mat- 
ter went before the people of Boston, I 
doubt if they would surrender their rights to 
commissions. 1 think that three members of the 
Board of Aldermen as a committee and the Mavor 
would be sufficient to regulate the police. We 
have a gentleman at the head of that department 
who has been a police officer all his life, and if he 
has any ability he can manage it. If we are going to 
put all the departments under commissions, what 
is there tor us to do? But I object to it because 
its object is to remove power from the people 
through their representatives. Just so long as 
the representatives ot the people have a voice in 
making the beads of departments in City Hall, 
they have to walk straight and show some respect 
for even the humblest 'member of the City Gov- 
ernment, But when you establish a commissi on, 
it takes a two-thirds vote of both brandies ten- 
two years before you can abolish it. I hope the 
members of the City Government will see the pro- 
priety of maintaining their rights and the rights 
of the people, and go in for no more commissions 
in this City Hall. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— As chairman of the 
committee whicn reported this order, I suppose it 
is proper for me to say a tew words. 1 had hoped 
we should not get to discussing the whole question 
ot the propriety of commissions at this stage of 
proceedings. "The question now is simply 
whether we shall ask the Legislature for 
authority to turn this department of the 
Government over to a commission, and the 
proper time to discuss the propriety of doing so 
will be hereafter, when we get the power. We 
have hardly lime to oiscuss the main question 
now, bec^ise it this order is going to be present- 
ed to the Legislature at all, it must be sent there 
soon. It mu-t go there quickly, else it will be of no 
use to pass it this year, and the subject cannot be 
acted upon until another session ot the Legisla- 
ture. Therefore I hope gentlemen will see the 
propriety of passing this order to get the authori- 
ty from the Legislature, and then we can consider 
the subject more carefully and act upon it accord- 
ing to our bent opinion. I had supposed that the 
idea was very generally entertained that there was 
a necessity tor putting the police in charge of a 
commission, I have understood — I think I am 
not mistaken — that his Honor Mayor Prince was 
equally In favor of this, from his experience last 
year. It is n't a new notion of Mayor Pierce, and 
I understood — and I believe correctly — that 
Mayor Prince had the same opinion at 
the beginning of his year of office, and also af- 
ter a year's experience in the City Gov- 
ernment; that he thought it was desirable to put 
the Police Department in the hands of three 
men who should make it their business to 
attend to that department carefully, give their 
time to it, and not — like a committee of the Alder- 
men — give only such time as they can catch from 
other public business and from their private 
affairs They are on other committees, and, be- 
ing perhaps theie only one year, they cannot 
get. thoioughly posted during their term of 
office, wher as with a commission holding 
office for three yearp, and only one member 
changing each year, there will always be a 
pei man -ncy in the body ; the members would have 
time to do the work, and, it being their business to 
attend to that depaitn enr, they would give time 
and attention to it, ju*i as a man does to his pri- 
vate business, and would nor. treat it as a side mar- 
ter. The gentleman from Ward 2 speaks of it as 
taking away the rights ot the people. In one sense 
we may say all our present form of government is 
taking away certain immediate powers and 



FEBRUARY 14 



187 8 



ZS 



rights of the people. A large city cannot be 
governed directly by the peoule in town meeting. 
That used to be the fortu of government when this 
city was a great deal smaller than it is now. All 
the people used to go to town meeting in Faneuil 
Hall; all the citizens went down there and voted 
upon what they thought best should be done, and 
matters were passed upon according to the best 
judgment of the people at the time. But after 
tne city got large and the business to be trans- 
acted became very complicated, the people had 
to turn their affairs over to the Aldermen and 
Common Council, it may be said that that was 
taking away the rights of the people; but it seems 
to me it wis enabling the people to exercise their 
rights in a more convenient and efficient manner. 
Sow, it has been thought by many persons, well 
qualified to judge, that it is desirable to govern 
this department of the police through other means 
than a committee of the Board of Aldermen, 
namely, a commission; but that commission will 
have derived its power from the people. It will 
be created by the people— indiiectly it is true- 
through the Mayor; but it will be really the people 
who will do everything, except through different 
machinery. The busiuess of the city has become 
so complicated that it has to be done through 
different machinery from that formerly employed, 
and the only question now is what that 
machinery shall be. I believe this machinery of 
the commissions has been found to be an efficient 
and desirable form of transacting the business of 
departments that require a great deal of attention 
and work. I believe our Fire Commission has 
done a good work, and I am of the opinion that a 
police commission would produce an equally satis- 
factory result. On this point I should differ from 
the gentleman who has just spoken. The com- 
missioners would, indeed, be less subject to the 
threats or requests of various members of the 
Council, who might say, if you don't do this or 
that, you will have your salary cut down ; or if you 
don't'do this or that, you cannot be reelected. A 
commission is likely to be more independent, do 
its work better, more honestly and'efficiently. 
The gentleman says that a commission is in 
such a position that it can refuse to recognize the 
requests of members of the City Government. It 
should listen to them; it should not be beyond our 
control, and should be bound to treat all our re- 
quests with respect; but it should not be immedi- 
ately dependent upon the favor of individuals. I 
think that a commission ,the members of which hold 
office for a terra of three years, and are not liable 
to be removed unless for "decided misconduct, are 
more likely to manage the affairs of the city prop- 
erly than the same men would be if they 
were liable to be tossed about by every wind 
of popular passion and prejudice. These, 
in general terms, are my reasons for be- 
lieving we should petition the Legisla- 
ture for this power. As I said before, I should 
hope we shall not go into the general sub- 
ject of the value of commissions to-night. It is a 
complicated question; there are two sides to it, 
and I don't tbink we can properly discuss it to- 
night. But I hope the Council will be willing to 
pass the order and let the petition be presented to 
the Legislature, it the authority is granted, the 
whole question, whether it is expedient to create 
the conimission, may be discussed as fully as we 
may see fit and until we are all tired of it. 

Mr. Thompson ot Ward 9 — As a member of the 
Committee on Ordinances, who investigated this 
subject and reported this order, I think I can un- 
derstand in part some of the causes which give 
the warmth of feeling to the gentleman from 
Ward 2 in his discussion of this matter. I for one 
had no doubt in my mind, when I joined in rec- 
ommending the passage of this order. From the 
examination of the Chief and Deputy Chief 
belore the committee, it was apparent that 
the time had come in the government of this 
great and growing city for some change in 
the machinery for conducting our police 
affairs. The gentleman asks, What are we 
to do here if we put into the bands of 
commissioners all the executive duties of the 
City Government ? If it is f ai r to compare a great 
thing with a small thing, I would ask him what 
he would think of commanding the army of the 
United States by a committee of the House of 
Representatives. In governing the police force 
by a committee, we act upon the same principle, 
and it is only because of the magnitude of the 
the army that the ridiculousness of it appears 
more plainly. 



Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19— How many com- 
manding generals do we have in the army? 

Mr. Thompson— One, sir. Such an experiment 
for governing an army has been tried by the first 
French Republic, and they abandoned it because 
experience proved it a complete failure. It seems 
to me that a mere glance at the department is 
enough to couvince us that it should be taken out 
of the control of a body like this. You have got 
to manage seven or eight hundred men, keep 
them in discipline, remove as far as possible from 
their personal characters, and force them to act 
as far as possible- 
Mr. Spenceley— Like slaves. 

Mr. Thompson — Like senseless units, to carry 
out the will of their superior officers. The gentle- 
man in front asks how many commanding gen- 
erals we have. Perhaps he will try to compare 
our single general to our Chief of Police. Had he 
been on the committee, and heard the testimony 
given by the Chiet of Police, perhaps he would n't 
have made th> j comparison. The Chief is a com- 
mander only in name. We had a Fire Depart- 
ment governed on this plan, and when the test 
came at the great fire it tailed absolutely, 
as was shown by the very protracted investiga- 
tion made after the fire, and which resulted in 
the establishment of the Fire Commission. As 
my colleague says, the time to discuss the details 
of this measure is when the ordinance to establish 
the commission comes before us, and the matter 
to be discussed then will be whether there shall be 
one or tw.> or three men. But the subject to dis- 
cuss now is whether we should obtain authority to 
take the department out of the hands of the Board 
of Aldermen and put it in charge of men with a 
fixed tenure of office, which would enable them to 
act independently of men who are mean enough 
to let personal prejudice influence their votes. 
There have been and there will be 
such men in the City Council, and it is the 
part of wise men to consider that human nature 
is not perfect, and provide for such things. This 
order is merely a step in the direction to which 
the City Government has been pressed for years 
past. The present Mayor was not the first to 
suggest it. It was suggested by mayors in the 
past. It was suggested by the Mayor, was re- 
ferred to the committee, who called before tbem 
the officers in charge of the police force, and their 
testimony was unqualifiedly in favor of putting 
the department in the hands of a body of men 
having a fixed tenure of office; and your 
committee recommend that you authorize 
the Mayor to petition the Legislature to 
give you the power to discuss it. When 
that is obtained the ultimate question must come 
up, but now you are only taking a step in the 
road which you must sooner or later follow. It is 
not the part of wisdom to delay and block the 
course of progress by querulous complaints. Our 
proper duty is to control the purse strings of this 
city; and when we remember that that purse 
contains annually some ten millions of dol- 
lars, I think gentlemen will see that we will have 
enough to do it we carefully examine the ac- 
counts of the departments, criticise their action 
and refuse unnecessary appropriations when they 
ask for them. In that way we will have a just 
and wise administration of the law, and that is 
what the citizens of Boston desire. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 — The gentleman from 
Ward 9 seems to speak very strongly of the neces- 
sity of this commission. I have yet to learn of 
any great abuse in the Police Department. I have 
yet to learn that the Chief of Police has not power 
to act in any emergency as tar as the Police De- 
partment is concerned. What the Chief of Police 
may have said I know not. But the idea that has 
been forced upon us here is that we ought to 
place this term of office upon a longer 
time. Now, what is it ? If we are going 
to elect a Board of Aldermen, three men 
can be selected as a committee, and we 
have a Mayor at the head of the police. If they 
cannot do the busiuess when they are elected for 
only one year, why not make their term three or five 
years, and if possible keep these people from bick- 
ering and going around and talking, and saying it is 
none of their business. The very theory of our 
Government is that it is for the people and by the 
people; each man is a citizen and has his voice in 
it; he may not do it in a gentlemanly man- 
ner; he may not be an educated man; 
and a man hindering public affairs. At 
the same time what do we accept those 
positions for, except for these three purposes? I 
do not like this long term. I have nothing to say 



59 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



against the present boards ol commissioners; 
they may have worker! very well. 1 have no ob- 
jection to their way ol dothg business; but I do 
object id the principle of it— the appointing 
power, this taking away of power so far from the 
people. Now, I wish to talk about this thing just 
exactly as it appears to me, and then to try and 
keep this power as near the people as possible. If 
the citizens cannot elect representatives who will 
perform their duties, then our Government is a 
sham and a mistake; if we are not capable of 
electiug a man every year, why did some of us 
make such an effort last year when we opposed 
the last Government? It 18 said that it a man is 
put in there as a commissioner, two-thirds of 
the City Council can remove him tor cause; but 
what is the use of commencing a thing it there is 
to be so much trouble about getting rid of it? I 
have no doui^t there are abuses and trouble in 
the Police Department, but I believe they have 
got along very well since 1870. The police force has 

freatly Increased with the growth of the city, 
am not suspicious about commissions. I am not 
afraid to go to the Legislature and get this power. 
I admit that it is but a small item ot S80U0 or $9000 
a year for salaries of the commissioners, but it is 
an expense ot $15,000 or S'20,000 a year, because 
you create a sort of bureau, with clerks and as- 
sistants. This is a very economical year, and it is 
proposed to cut down appropriations. Still, if 
there was any other way, and the abuses are 
proved to be ot sufficient magnitude. 1 should not 
hesitate to vote lor the commission; but I don'tsee 
them at the present tune, and in my opinion there 
is no necessity for it It maybe great trouble to 
his Honor the Mayor to appoint men upon the 
police force; the petitions are received and laid 
upon file and are taken out as The men are wanted 
and placed before the Police Committee, who ex- 
amine them and report to the Hoard ot Aldermen, 
and the men are confirmed. I don't believe that 
the members of this city Council Softer with a 
great deal of overwork, and as [ don't believe in 
commissions I sba' n't vote tor them until some 
more cause is shown than I have heard. 

Mr. Spenceley ol Ward 19 — Tbisjinatter seems to 
have taken a great deal of time of the Committee 
on Ordinances, who ha ve found out the ideas ol 
the community generally and the Chief of Police 
in particular. Therefore 1 move to lay it on the 
table, so as to give time to members of the Coun- 
cil to investigate the merits and demerits of the 
question. 

Mr Sibley— I hope that motion will not prevail. 
It is pretty near the end of the Time for present- 
ing petitions to the Legislature. As There can be 
no new business introduced after the end of this 
month. I hope the motion will not prevail. 

Mr. Thompson— The gentleman from Ward 6 is 
so fair in his dealing with this matter that I 
•would like to ask two questions which, perhaps, 
he has not considered. "Did ne read the remarks 
of the Chairman of The Committee on Ordinances 
in the Board of Aldermen, who said that the 
Chief of Police— 

Mr. Spenceley (tailed Mr. Thompson to order, 
the motion being to lay on the table 

The President — Debate is allowed tor ten min- 
utes, and each speaker is eonfiued to three min- 
utes. 

Mr. Thompson— If the gentleman will not inter- 
rupt me, be will save time. The Chief of Police 
said that in his opinion the discipline gained by 
governing the police, by a commission would dis- 
pense with enough patrolmen to pay the salaries 
of the commissioners. Furthermore, I would ask 
if the gentleman remembers that the present or- 
der asks for the Consolidation ot the License 
Commission and the Police Department. At 
present the License Commissioners are perform- 
ing duties which should be performed by the 
police. This is one of the things we shall gain. I 
should like to ask bid) one other question, be- 
cause I think this subject is one that divides 
men's opinions honestly, because it is thought 
that it is intended to put the power away from 
the people. If the Mayor is elected annually, 
is n't he as near the people as Common Council- 
men are who are elected annually" 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5— Then why not elect the 
Mayor for a longer time, ir you apply the princi- 
ple to the commissioners? That is the question. 
Why not apply it equally to the Mayor, Aldermen 
and Common Council? Hut I say that if we give 
the Mayor the appointing power, and we elect a 
bad man tor Mayor he will appoint men to suit 
himself, and we confirm them or not. We all know 
the influence brought to bear. We don't know the 



men and cannot raise an objection. We tried last 
year to deleat one man's confirmation, and got 
most gloriously whipped. But I say keep the 
term shorter, i have no prejudice against Com 
missions. It the City Council see fit to elect men 
for three years I might vote tor it. 

.Mr. Colby <>t Ward 18—1 shall be very bappv to 
discuss the real question upon its merits it that 
opportunity is ever granted. I am very glad to 
hear the gentleman from Ward 5 confess tbar be 
is not speaking upon the question really before 
Us. The only question that we are to discuss to- 
night, as I understand it, is whether or not we 
shall petition the Legislature for an act authoriz- 
ing us to establish a police commission ; and when 
the act is passed then the question will properly 
come before us. Having been upon the committee 
before when this question was heard and discussed 
at some length, I must say now that I am in favor 
of such a commission, and I hope we shall peti- 
tion the Legislature fdr an act authorizing us to 
create one; and if we do not want it we can 
settle the question when we have the authority 
from the Legislature. It certainly can do no hariii 
to petition for this authority ; we need not use it 
unless we wish to. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 hope the motion of 
the gentleman from Ward 19 will prevail, 
and The subject be laid upon the table. 
The Committee on Ordinances, the chair- 
man especially, says this is a very important sub- 
ject, and thai there are two sides" to it, and that it 
should receive a thorough investigation and dis- 
cussion. Now they have the advantage on their 
side of baving beard the evidence, and l take it 
for granted that they are all in tavor ot the com- 
mission. 1 certainly hrve not heard the evi- 
dence, and I do not propose to vote for ir, until 
we get some more light upon it. They tell us 
they have had the Chief and the Deputy Chief 
before them, anil that those officers in their wis- 
dom recommend obtaining liberty to establish 

tins commission Hut the committee utterly 

tailed to give us any evidence o. the necessity of 
establishing the police commission, and we have 
to take their word for it, which is the only proof. 
A gentleman on The committee says this is no 
time, to discuss this question ; that it is merely 
a question of applying tor the power, and when 
the power i- granted, the question can 
be discussed. That is all very nice, but 
it is a trap to catch something, and I hope the 
Council will nor be caught by it. I don't care 
whether you call it a commission or not; 1 am 
satisfied that it is in fact intended to take away 
powers that the City Council have had ever since 
the present form ot government was established; 
and unless they show good reasons for commis- 
sions, I propose to vote against it myself, and 
against going to the Legislature for authority 
to establish tbem. One of the committee 
on Ordinances says that Mayor Prince, as well as 
.Mayor I'ierce, favors the Police Commission. I 
do not know the meaning of that, but 1 don't 
care whether Prince or Pierce favor it. I don't 
propose to go to them ana get wisdom upon the 
question; I am here to represent the views ot a 
certain portion of the citizens of this city, and 1 
am nor in lavor of the commission. The 
gentleman from Ward 9 [Mr. Crocker] tells 
us something about people goiutr down 
to Faneuil Hall, and casting their votes. 
All I have to say is that, if the act re- 
cently proposed pass the Legislature, there 
will lie room enough left for all the voters to get 
into Faneuil Hall, as it compels men to pay a 
poll tax of $2 and adils a large percentage "for 
interest tor the time they remain unpaid. The 
gentleman from Ward 9 [Mr. Thompson] speaks 
of the Fire Department being in its palmiest days, 
and of the investigation that was held 
ot the tire. I guess he was absent from 
the city at the time, but I should like 
to ask him if be could tell what conclusion that 
commission arrived at. A great many people 
have tried to find out their conclusion, but they 
have failed. He says it is taking away the duties 
of the License Commissioners. Hut we may have 
a prohibitory law, and of what use then will the 
License Commissioners be? I don't think that ar- 
gument will hold good. The License Commission 
will not be established till the first of 
May ; we have an able commission work- 
ing at starvation prices, and if we have 
a good commission next year, we can afford to 
retain them at a fair salary, and keeps the pres 
ent Police Committee in charge of that depart- 
ment. I hope the motion to lay upon the table 



FEB KU A K Y 14 



187S 



60 



will prevail^ so that we may get some light. I 
am not afraid of the commission if there is any 
reason for it. The committee have all the facts, 
and why not let us have some. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 11— I hope that motion 
will not prevail, and that the order will pass. 

Mr. Spenceley raised the point of order that the 
time for debate had expired, which the President 
said was correct. 

On motion of Mr. Rosnosky of Ward 16, the yeas 
and nays were ordered and the order was laid on 
the table — yeas 36, nays 34. 

Yeas— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, N. 
Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Cox, Day, Denny, 
Delvin, Doherty, Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, Kelley, 
Kendricken, Kidney, Lovering, McDonald, Mc- 
G-abey, McGaragle, McGeough, Mullane, Mullen, 
O'Connor, Roach, Roberts. Rosnosky, Santry, 
Spenceley, J. Taylor, Thorndike, Toppan, Which- 
er, Wilson, Woolley— 36. 

Nays— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Coe, O 1- 
by, Crocker, Danfortb, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Hol- 
lis, Howland, Lauten, Mowry, Nason, Pearl, Per- 
ham, Plimpton, J. B. Richardson, M. W. Richard- 
son, Rust, E.H. Sampson, O. H. Sampson, H. N. 
Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, Sibley, Smith, J. F. 
Taylor, Thompson, Ward, Webster, Wolcott, Wy- 
man— 34. 

Absent or not voting— Mr. Pierce— 1. 

[The subject was considered again, later iu the 
session.] 

CLERK OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

The order to allow and pay $1150 a year as sal- 
ary for clerk of Park Commissioners, from April 
1, 1877, was considered under unfinished business 
and was passed. Sent up. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

The election of a Superintendent of Common 
and Public Grounds came up as unfinished busi- 
ness. A ballot was ordered. Committee — Messrs. 
Barnard of Ward 24, Smith of Ward 9, Rosnosky 
of Ward 16. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 asked for some in- 
formation as to the status the matter, urging 
a postponement until after the action of the Al- 
dermen who laid it on the table; but the President 
ruled that the election came up as unfinished 
business. 

A motion to reconsider the vote to proceed to 
ballot, by Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24, was lost— 29 
for, 38 against. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24 presented a petition 
signed by Abbott Lawrence, George B. Emerson, 
Wendell Phillips and others, in favor of a change 
in Superintendent of the Common. 

Mr. Thompson desired to make some remarks 
on the subject, but the President said a ballot had 
been ordered, and discussion could not be had. 

Mr. Thompson asked consent, but Mr. McGara- 
gle objected. 

The ballot resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes ...70 

Necessary for a choice 36 

John Galvin had 30 

William Doogue 26 

Hermann Grund el 10 

Augustus P. Calder 2 

Alexander Greenlaw 1 

Osborne Howes, Jr 1 

And there was no choice. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 moved to lay the elec- 
tion on the table for the present. 

Declared carried. Mr. Kelley of Ward 6 doubt- 
the vote; and on motion of Mr. Burke of Ward 2 
the yeas and nays were ordered. 

The motion to lay on the table was lost— yeas 30, 
nays 39: 

Yeas — Messrs. Brown, Colby, Crocker, Dan- 
forth, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Hollis, Howland 
Lovering, McDonald, Mowry, Nason, Perham, 
Plimpton, J. B. Richardson, M. W. Richardson, 
Roberts, Rust, E. H. Sampson, O. H. Sampson, 
H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Thompson, Toppan, 
Ward, Webster, Whicher, Wilson, Wolcott, 
Wyman — 37. 

Nays— Messrs. Barnard, Barry, Brawley, B. 
Brintnall, N. Y. Brintnall, Burke, Clapp, Coe, Cox, 
Day, Denny, Devlin, Doherty, Drynan, Fernald, 
Flynn, Ke'lley, Kendricken, Kidney, Lauten, 
McGahey, McGaragle, McGeough, Mullane, Mul- 
len, O'Connor, Pearl, Roach, Rosnosky, Santry, 
Shepard, Sibley, Smith. J. F. Taylor, J.Taylor, 
Thorndike, Woolley— 38 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Cannon, Pierce, 
Spenceley— 3. 

Mr. McGaragle moved to proceed to a second 
ballot. 



Mr. Thompson — I am very glad I have an oppor- 
tunity to make some remarks upon this question 
before we proceed to a ballot. I don't know that 
they will be of very great importance to other 
minds ; but they have very considerable weight 
and influence with me. Last year it became 
necessary, in consequence of an application by 
the Committee on Common and Squares, for an 
additional appropriation to make an investigation 
into the management of that department. Those 
who were here and are familiar with that 
investigation must certainly have got the impres- 
sion that the department had been managed in 
the past in as loose a manner as possible. I made 
an examination of the pay rolls of that depart- 
ment, and I say here that those pay rolls were a 
disgrace to the City Government. 

Mr. Kelley of Ward 6—1 rise to a point of order. 
The question before the house is whether we shall 
proceed to the election of Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Grounds, and I don't believe it is the duty of 
this Council to run over the proceedings of last 
year. 

The President ruled that discussion of the merits 
of candidates was in order. 

Mr. Thompson — I examined the pay rolls of 
that department last year, and I repeat it, 
that they were a disgrace to any department, 
and to any city which permits them. I told 
the chairman of the Committee on Common on 
the part of the Council that I had been 
investigating them, and he said he had never been 
able to find out anything about them. I found 
that while the committee limited the Superin- 
tendent to the employment of 140 men a month, 
that for a time he averaged 200 men. I think 1 
am right in saying 200. While I wouldn't state 
that positively, it is a very much larger number of 
men than he was limited to by his committee. 
He kept this up for two months at least, and he 
was in excess of his limit for three or four 
months. The consequence was his department ex- 
pended their appropriation long befere the year 
was out, and tbey were forced to come here iu 
consequence of that and other causes, to ask for 
an additional appropriation. It transpired in the 
investigation that the Superintendent of Common 
and Squares kept a regular ledger account with 
members of the City Council, and credited each one 
with so many men, and if a member got beyond a 
certainnumber of men, he was stopped. That is to 
say, he was making his department a political 
roost. Now, however nice it may be to get our 
man on, yet as trustees of the City Government, 
we cannot help seeing that it is n't the way to 
od business. The testimony came before the 
committee of some of the most reputable citi- 
zens of Boston, an>l it was admitted by the 
Superintendent, that men were employed in 
that department who were utterly worthless 
and unfit for the place. The testimony was 
that there were three or four, and even 
more than that number of times more 
men employed in doing the work than there 
should have been. Now, is a man worthy of your 
ballots for reelection who, from weakness of 
character and willingness to aid his friends, will 
conduct a department in that way? 1 hope the 
new members will give a chance for a. comparison 
with the present Superintendent by putting in a 
new man, who can show whether or not the Com- 
mon and squares of this city can be run for a 
much lower sum than they have cost in the past. 
I have no doubt there are many members of last 
year's City Government who would be glad to re- 
peat and reecho what I say, and uree upon the 
new members to rally in purifying the administra- 
tion of this department of the City Government. 

Mr. Brawley of Ward 19— Was a committee ap- 
pointed to investigate these matters last year? 

Mr. Thomnson — A committee was appointed to 
investigate the expenditures caused by the grad- 
ing around the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument. 
The matters to which I referrea came out inci- 
dentally in the course of that investigation, but 
they were not investigated. 

Mr. Brawley— Were any charges made against 
the Superintendentlast year? 

Mr. Thompson — They were not investigated, but 
they were substantiated by the investigations of 
the committee. 

Mr. Brawley — Will the gentleman, instead of 
giving us these various charges, give us the con- 
clusions arrived at by the committee after investi- 
gating this case? 

Mr. Thompson — The committee did not inves- 
tigate them and did not make any report upon 
them. 



61 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



Mr. Brawley— Do I understand that the charges 
to which we have just listened emanated from 
the gentleman from Ward !)'.' 

Mr. Thompson — The charges I now make are 
based upon evidence which came out incidentally 
in the course ot that investigation. We all knew 
that the investigation, although confined by the 
order to narrow bounds, took a wi:ie range and a 
great many matters came out in the evidence 
which were not considered by the committee in 
making their report. 

Mr. Brawley— When those charges came out 
was any action taken upon them by the last City 
Council ? 

Mr. Thompsou— If the gentleman will ask me 
questions with some point to them Twill answer 
them. The records show all that. 

.Mr. Brawley— The only object in asking these 
questions was to find out what authority the gen- 
tleman had lor making the assertion. If I under- 
stand this matter correctly there were some seri- 
ous charges made against the Superintendent last 
year, and a committee was appointed to invee 
tigate them: and since then I can learn— 

Mr. Thompson— Allow me to correct the gentle- 
man. No committee was appointed to investigate 
charges against the Superintendent of Common; 
but a committee was appointed to investigate the 
Committee on Common and Squares. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2— I had the honor of serv- 
ing upon that Committee of Investigation, and 
whereas the chairman on the part of the Council is 
a member of tins City Government, 1 think that, 
as a member of that committee, it is my duty to 
l few words in relation to that report as far 
as my memory enables me to at the present time. 
The gentleman from Ward 9 says that the report 
was iu some decree a censure of Mr. Galvin. 
If that was sci I must confess that I was 
mistaken in it. 1 have not a copy ot that 
report here, but I think upon examination it will 
be found that throughout the whole investiga- 
tion Mr. Galvin was thoroughly examined and 
Cross-examined, and I think he was thoroughly 
investigated; audit I apprehend the meaning ol 
that report, it censured certain gentlemen on 
the committee, but none who wen? members of 
the past City Government, and that it took all 
the blame from .Mr. Galvin. There was a strong 
effort made by members of the City Council 
last year who are members this yoar, 
to implicate Mr. Galvin, and make it ap- 
pear that his department was run in a very loose 
and extravagant manner. 1 think that was what 
gave rise to that investigation, and I think the 
first and main object of it was to implicate Mr. 
Galvin as a man unfit for that place; while I think 
the result of that investigation will show that he 
attended to his duties, and did all that was his 
duty to do, ami nothing else. I think the record 
of the committee and the testimony of the then 
honorable chairman of the Board of Aldermen, 
who is a highly respectable citizen in Boston, 
certainly clears Mr. Galvin in regard to that de- 
partment. Previous to this discussion this even- 
ing, the gentleman from Ward i) insinuated that 
members of this City Council allowed their preju- 
dices to influence their votes. I tlid not see fit to 
answer the question at the time, but I will say 
now that I don't know of auy gentleman here who 
has allowed his votes to be influenced by his 
prejudice, and I think the gentleman from Ward 
9 is the only one whom I can conceive by his ac- 
tion as having done so. 

Mr. Barry ot Ward 22— A.8 the gentleman from 
Ward 9 has seen fit to call the attention of the 
new members of the Council to some transactions 
in regard to the Superintendent of Common last 
year, I desire to call the attention of the same 
gentleman to the inconsistency of the remarks 
of the gentleman from Ward 9 at one of the last 
meetings of the last year and his remarks this 
evening. The question was upon taking from the 
table the order for the removal of the Superin- 
tendent of Public Grounds, and I read as follows 
from the minutes: 

"Mr. Thompson of Ward 9— After carefully read- 
ing the evidence before the Investigating Com- 
mittee, I do not believe there was any cause for 
the removal of the Superintendent. I believe he 
was exculpated from a large part of the blame iu 
the transaction investigated. So far as blame 
could be imputed to him, it was for weakness in 
giving way to the pressure from members of the 
City Government. The greater part of the blame 
rests upon the system. As I offered the original 
motion, it is due to the City Forester that I make 



this statement. 1 hope it will be indefinitely post- 
poned." 

Now, sir. I want to know the difference between 
the City Forester of that time and the City For- 
ester of today. He is the same identical man. If 
the same was wrong then, which perhaps I do 
not deny, will the gentleman turn his efforts to 
reform the system and not to removing the man 
who, the report of the same investigating com- 
mittee said, was not to blame. The gentleman 
admitted it then, and I would like to know what 
new evidence he has obtained. It he presents 
any new evidence to show that the Superinten- 
dent is inefficient, he ought to present it. and not 
rely upon that old report, from which he admit- 
ted that there was not sufficient evidence to i e- 
inove the man. 

Mr. Thompson— 1 thank the gentleman for read- 
ing just what he has read, because it will help me 
bling this question clearly before the presenr 
Council. The investigation grew out of the fol- 
lowing tacts: The committee en that department 
having expended their appropriation, came to this 
Council and asked tor an increase. In making a 
statement of the reasons that led to asking lor 
the additional appropriation, the chairman ot the 
committee on the part of the Council made such a 
statement that upon the lace ot it it appeared to 
me that the Superintendent of Common and 
Squares ought to be removed. I thereupon put 
in an order that the Superintendent of Com- 
mon and Squares be "removed for cause, 
and moved its reference to an investigat- 
ing committee. That order was laid on 
the table and the gentleman from Cbarles- 
town offered an order for a committee to investi- 
gate the reasons for an additional appropriation, 
and whether or not any neglect ot duty had oc- 
curred in that department. The investigation oc- 
curred on thai order, and, as 1 said, it took a 
pretty wide range. At tunes it was directed 
largely to the purchase of certain plants ; at other 
times to the contract for supplying the city with 
flowers. Now, that is one point with which the 
Superintendent has some connection, and it 
should be known here. It appeared ;:-. a 
fact that the city wanted seven or eight 
thousand dollars' worth of peculiar kinds of 
plants everv soring, to enable the Superintendent 
to make his be. Is; and it also appeared that no 
general knowledge was given out in the fall as to 
what kind of plants would be wanted: lint in the 
spring the committee were informed by Mr. Gal- 
vin what kind of plants he wanted, hast year a 
sub-committee was appointed, and a gentleman 
went out to the greenhouse of Calvin' Brothers, 
and told them to let the Superintendent have as 
many flowers as he wanted; and I think it 
was In evidence that he didn't know the 
price at all. The City Forester knew- the 
spirit of the statute that no officer ot the City 
Government shall be interested directly or indi- 
rectly in furnishing supplies to the city: but 
knowing that, he did furnish plants to the city in 
Che name of his sons, because he and his sons are 
practically the same. As one result of the in\ es- 
timation the committee recommended the pas- 
sage of an ordinance making it the duty of the 
Committee on Common to advertise in the fall, 
naming the number and quality of flowers wanted 
in the spring. 

Mr. Sibley— The gentleman says that Mr. Calvin 
and his sons are one. Where is the evidence'.' 
Has he evidence, or is it inference'.' 

Air. Thompson— The evidence was obtained in a 
conversation with .Mr. Galvin, in which he re- 
ferred to the greenhouse as his greenhouse. He 
spoke of the employment of men upon the Com- 
mon unfit ami incapable ot doing auy service, at 
$1.78 a day, while he employed capable men in his 
greenhoti8t for $1.26 a day. During the investiga- 
tion Mr. Calvin was asked, Why do you allow 
your committee to do thus and so? And 
he replied that he had nothing to do with 
it. Mr. Galvin is employed by the city to super- 
intend that department; he is the responsible 
head, is responsible to the City Council, and he 
cannot conscientiously say that he had nothing to 
do with it. As the responsible head ot the de- 
partment, it was his business, wheu he saw any- 
thing wrong, to protest, and have his protest en- 
tered upon the records of his committee. Noth- 
ing of that kind occurred. He allowed this loose 
manner of doing business to go on, and he aided 
it in the selection of laborers. Referring to that 
matter, the Investigating Committee said— 

"The manner in which laborers are procured to 
work on the Common and Public Garden (through 



FEBRUARY 14, 1878 



62 



the 'influence' or by the recommendation of mem- 
bers of the City Council) is an unqualified nui- 
sance and wrong: it has grown up, under our sys- 
tem of government, but it is bad in every particu- 
lar, — bad for the Alderman or Common Council- 
man who is put to the inconvenience of begging 
or demanding the situation sought for; bad for 
the laborer who gets and holds his situation only 
through the favor of the Aldermau or Common 
Councilman ; and bad for the city who has to pay 
for the services of a person sometimes ill-quali- 
fied tor the work, to be changed in a tew weeks 
for anocher still less qualified. Let it be abolished ! 
The city needs in this department a permanent 
body of men, trained to the work." 

Now I will tell the result of my own investiga- 
tion, which can be confirmed by any member of 
this City Government who wishes to, by calling at 
the Auditor's office and asking to see the monthly 
pay rolls and adding the number of days' work 
and the number of men together, he can find the 
average of each man's work. 

Mr. Brawley— I would like to ask the gentleman 
a question. 

Mr. Thompson— I will not give way. The gen- 
tleman can say what he has to say when I get 
through. These men were employed largely in 
excess of the number allowed by the committee: 
they were kept at work six or seven days and 
then discharged, were kept floating back and 
forth, aud were not retained long enough to learn 
to do anything as it should be done; they were a 
charge on the City Treasury, aud the result of the 
abuse was that the committee were forced to the 
humiliation of coming to this City Government to 
get money to carry on the department. When such 
a man as that is at the head of the department, I 
ask the gentleman from Ward 22, in all candor, if 
I have said one word different from what I said 
last year. I said then that they had not sustained 
the charges made ou the night I moved the refer- 
ence of an order for his removal, and that he 
ought not to be removed for cause, but that he 
was to blame for his weakness in giving way to 
political pressure. I say that now; and when the 
matter comes up de novo for an election, I say 
that the evidence is too strong to be disregarded, 
and ought to control the honest!vote of every man 
here, 1 wish this thing could be put off, because I 
understood that the Committee on Common and 
Squares had agreed upon a report recommending 
that the department be put in charge of the Park 
Commission, and that it was to have been pre- 
sented in a few weeks. I was sorry to see this 
matter of an election forced upon us, for in a 
week or two we might consider the proposed 
change. This is undoubtedly an attempt 
on the part of this man and an army 
of devoted friends— and I know of no man who 
has more devoted friends — to push him upon the 
city for another year. The action of the Board 
of Aldermen in putting it upon the table was 
wise, and our action "in taking it up is un- 
wise; but since it has been forced upon us, I hope 
we shall rebuke it by electing a man to run that 
department as cheaply as possible. 

[Applause in the galleries, which the President 
checked.! 

Mr. Barry of Ward 22— The gentleman asks me 
whether he is talking different from what he said 
last year. I am not a lawyer, and according to a 
legal consideration there may not be; but accord- 
ing to a grammatical construction there is — alter 
the onslaught which he has made tonight, I should 
say there is a difference. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 don't know that I 
am classed among the strong friends of the Su- 
perintendent of Common, or that we shall depre- 
ciate the interests of the city of Boston by elect- 
ing him again. This matter has come up in the 
regular course, and has been laid on the table m 
the Board of Aldermen. It comes up here as un- 
finished business, and in the regular order the 
gentleman brings in all the cha.rges against 
the Superintendent of Common. You might 
as well take his word tor it as to 
go looking after the true cause; you 
could not hud it. There is no reason why we 
should not go into an election. The gentleman 
has his opinion and I have mine, and if we were 
all of one mind there would not be any need of 
our coming to the City Council. The only charge 
he makes is that last fall, when labor was scarce 
and people were out of employment, the Su- 
perintendent employed a great many men at 
a dollar and seventy-five cents a day. That 
was an alarming price, aud that is what 
sticks in the gentleman's crop. Last fall 



the gentleman went down into my ward, 
and spent a whole evening denouncing the Super- 
intendent for his extravagance in employing men 
for $1.75, when other corporations were paying 
but $1.25. That fact would make me vote tor him 
rather than vote against him. 

Mr. Brawley of Ward 19—1 arose a few moments 
ago to ask of the gentleman from Ward 9 a few 
questions, merely for information. I have no 
personal knowledge of either of the candi- 
dates for Superintendent of Common and Pub- 
lic Grounds. I looked over the report of 
the Investigating Committee and the remarks 
of the gentleman in the Council last year; and 
after listening to his remarks a few minutes ago, 
it is very difficult for any member here to judge 
what is true, or whether there is any truth in 
either of the statements. There being no point to 
my questions was probably due to my mistaking 
the investigation of the committee for that of the 
Superintendent having in charge the Common 
and public grounds, aud that is a mistake 
which any new member might possibly make. 
From the evidence, I supposed that the 
committee were Dot investigating the Com- 
mittee on Common, but that they were investi- 
gating the Superintendent. Furthprmore, I know 
that serious charges were made against the super- 
intendent and that they were not substantiated. 
The gentleman says we could go down to the 
Auditor's office and examine the pay rolls. For 
the benefit of the members of this Council I wish to 
state that I went to the Auditor's office, and asked 
for the pay rolls, and was refused. The only infor- 
mation I could get was the amount of money paid, 
the number of men and the price per day. I was 
in there, and asked one of the clerks, and he said 
they would not give me the information. They 
said I would have to come back in halt an hour. 
Now, there must be a mistake. Either the clerk 
in the Auditor's office or the gentleman from 
Ward 9 is mistaken. I have heard those charges 
made, and knowing the fact of the investiga- 
tion, I endeavored to ascertain the facts. If 
the gentleman from AVard 9 can give to 
a new member of the Council proof that 
the charges which he makes are true, of course I 
cannot possibly vote for the gentleman who was 
Superintendent last year. But I must say that a 
simple statement is not positive proof. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9— If the gentleman and 
enougu of his associates will vote to continue this 
matter one week from tonight, I will give iny 
positive proof from the pay roll ot the employment 
of these men. That is the gravamen of my charge. 
The gentleman's experierce is unfortunate. 
If he will come with me this week I will take him 
and get those pay rolls, and go through with 
them and convince him or the truth of every word 
I have said. . 

Mr. Brawley ot Ward 19— The gentlemen repre- 
senting AVard 19 are the peei s of any gentlemen in 
this Council, and if the gentlemen' from Ward 19 
cannot go to the Auditor's office and get those 
pay rolls, I should like to know why the gentle- 
man from Ward 9 should assume to take "the re- 
sponsibility of showing them to the gentlemen 
from Ward 19. 

Mr. Thompson— The gentleman misunderstood 
me. I should consider it a very great favor for 
the gentleman to go with me under those circum- 
stances. I only desire to get the facts. I am 
sony my remark should have been misconstrued 
by the gentleman; they were not so intended. 
Unless the Auditor has adopted some new rules, 
any member of the City Council can look at all 
the papers and records in the Auditor's office; and 
if not, they can go there by authority of an order 
of this Council. "The gentleman and! can go to- 
gether and get those facts. 

On motion of Air. Danforth of Ward 10. the sub- 
ject was specially assigned to next Thursday 
evening at nine o'clock, to give old and new mem- 
bers time to get at the facts— 39 for, 31 against. 

The President— The Chair will take this oppor- 
tunity to remind gentlemen in the galleries that 
applause or any other disturbance will not be 
permitted during the session of the Council. The 
dignity of the Council shall be maintained. 

ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 




63 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



also alluded to Mr. Barnard's statement at the 
previous meeting about one objectionable As-ist- 
aut Assessor wlio was forced upon Ward 24 last 
year, which he thought was a humiliating state- 
ment for Mr. 15. to make. 

Mr. Harnard repeated the statement made at 
tin- previous meeting, anil said that seven-eighths 
of the residents ot ward 24 would indorse it. 

On motion of Mr. Coe, the yeas and nays were 
ordered, and the reconsideration prevailed— yeas 
35, nays 34. 

Yeas — Messrs. Barry, Brawley, li. Brintnall, N. 
■\ . Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Cox, Denny, Devlin, 
Doherty, Drynan, Fernald. Flyun. Kelley, Ken- 
dncken, Kidney, Lauten, McDonald, McGahey, 
McOaragle. McOeough, Mullane, Mullen, O'Con- 
nor, Pearl, Roach, Rosnosky, Sibley, J. F. Taylor, 
J. Tavlor, Tborndike, Toppan, Wliicher, Wilson, 
Woolley- :;:>. 

Nays— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp,Coe,Colby, 
Crocker, Danforth, Day, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Htil- 
lis, Howland, Lovering, Mown, Nason, l'erhaiu, 
Plimpton, .1. K. Richardson, M. W. Richardsnn. 
Roberts, Rust, E. H. Sampson, 0. tt. Sampson, 
H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer. Shepard, Smith, Spenee- 
ley, Thompson, Ward, Webster, Wolcott, Wy- 
man— 84. 

A hseut or not voting— Messrs. Pierce, Santry— 2. 

On motion ot Mr. McOaragle the order was re- 
ferred to the Committee on Assessors' Depart- 
ment. Sent up. 

NUISANCE IN CHABJ I STOWN. 

On motion of Mr. Sibley ot Ward 5, the Council 
took up the special assignment for x.'iO P. M., via. : 

Order to petition lor an act to abate a public 
nuisance in Charlestown by rilling the territory 
northerly from Kastern Railroad, and westerly 
from (anal stieet. 

The President read a report from the Board of 
Health in response to the order of Feb. 12, seating 
that an approximate of the cost of abating the 
nuisance was as follows: 
To fill the mill pond and Hats adjoining to a point 

where the Fltcnburg Railroad crosses it— 

To grade 4 would require 313.000 vds. at 55c, #172,180 

<! " " 646.000 " " 300.300 

8 " " 838.000 " " 366,900 

10 " " 1. 130.000 " " 621,500 

The Board is not prepared to say to what extent 
tbe filling to the lower grade would mitigate the 
nuisance, but in their opinion grade ten is the 
lowest that would effectually abate it. SeDt up. 

The question was on the passage of the order. 

Mr. Mo wry of Ward 11— A week ago 1 asked to 
delay in order that I might investigate the mer- 
its ot this question and ascertain whether, in my 
opinion, we should pass this order or not. Since 
then I have examined it, so far as circumstances 
and time will permit, and can come to no other 
conclusion than that the Council should not pass 
the order. In the first place, I think the Board of 
Health already have ample and sufficient powers 
to abate this nuisance, and that it is im- 
politic to go to the General Court for 
further legislation. The board asked for 
the petition for an act upon the theory 
that it is necessary to till this large area of land to 
grade ten. There are three methods by which 
this nuisance can be abated, either one of which 
will be atterded with insignificant expense com- 
pared with what this tilling to grade ten would 
cost. I claim that by the removal of the tide 
water from this vast area the sun would act as a 
disinfectant upon the land, and practically abate 
the nuisance for tbe time being. In the second 
place, this nuisance will be practically abated by 
tilling upon this area to the depth of two or three 
feet. The third, or best method, is to erecta dam 
at the point through which tide water passes and 
keep the area flooded with water. In this 
way the area will be practically covered with 
sweet water, if I may use such an expression, and 
the nuisance will be abated. [Mr. Mowry ex- 
plained the location of the nuisance from a map 
on the wall.] If a dam were inserted, the Fitch- 
burg road and the city would have the means of 
keeping this vast area covered with pure water, 
and it seems to experts that this nuisance would 
be abated. The expense ot the dam will not be 
over .$2500 and the expense of a sewer to deep 
water, if necessary, about $10,000. The Fitcbburg 
road have already made an appropriation for till- 
ing their part of this area with one or two feet of 
gravel, if it is required, and to ask tor additional 
legislation would be unwise. 

Mr. Sibley— I think the gentleman has stated 
tbe circumstances very fairly. No one denies 



that the nuisance exists; the question is how to 
abateit it does n't seem to me there will be any 
danger of getting an act for the city to have a 
lien upon the land. The committee and Board of 
Health last, year did all in their power, and this 
question of the displacement of tide water stag- 
gers the Board ot Health. The Board say the 
dam can be erected, but then come- the Question 
of tide water. They thought it best to ask for 
this legislation. 

Mr. Mowry— The board deny the right of the 
Harbor Commissioner* to any damages for dis- 
placement of tide water. 

On motion of Mr. Sibley, the yeas and nays 
were ordered on the passage of the order. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 11 asked Mr. Mowry if 
be thought there was a nuisance there requiring 
abatement by the city authorities. 

Mr. Mowry— ] admit that there is a nuisance, 
but I think it has been grossly exaggerated. I 
claim that the entire nuisance can be abated by 
the erection of this dam and covering the area 
with water. That is the opinion of experts. 

Mr. Day ol Ward 4— I desire to correct a mis- 
take that the gentleman from Ward 10 has made, 
that the upper territory is also covered with sew- 
age, and the large sewer that makes a way down 
across those flats is tbe sewer from Somerville, 
and the whole territory is covered by the flowage 
from that sewer. If the dam is built across theie, 
would not the question of tide water coming into 
it be just as much as if the territory were filled '.' 

Mr. Mowry— In regard tothis matter of the Som- 
erville se ver, it has been admitted by competent 
persons and by legal gentlemen that Somerville 
has no legal rights to flow sewage there, 
and if this area is flowed by water, that the 
water will be retained there and that Som- 
erville will be compelled to drain somewhere 
else. They have no right to drain into it, is my 
opinion, after a more careful examination". 

Mi . Richardson of Ward 10— I would ask the 
gentleman it a nuisance does not exist there 
which requires some action of the city authorities 
to abate it, and I understand him to answer the 
question affirmatively. 1 do not know anything 
about the question. Now I teel that it would not 
be any harm to obtain the act from the 
Legislature to give the city a lien up- 
on land filled, and to exempt the city 
from payment of damages tor tte dis- 
placement of title water. I understand from 
the Board of Health that tbe work is necessary to 
be done for the permanent abatement df the 
nuisance, and that it is so large they don't and 
will not desire to undertake it without some legal 
power and authority other than they now have. 
If a nuisance existed anywhere upon private 
property the owner could be complained of and 
the nuisance abated, and the property sold for 
the cost; but in this case we are dealing with 
a bankrupt corporation, and no process of crim- 
inal law would be effectual. I understand that it 
will cost nothing to get this act, and it may be 
necessary. The power for the Board of Health to 
effectually abats this nuisance should be beyond 
question and peradventure. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11.— This matter has 
already been decided by the Supreme Court, 
which took the ground that municipalities are 
not liable for damages lor the displacement 
of tide-water in abating a nuisance. This 
going to the Legislature is on the theory that 
it is necessary to spend six or seven thousand 
dollars. The gentleman very well knows that any 
bill presented at the State House by the city of 
Boston may be changed, and that should large 
corporations owning seven-eighths of the area 
in question appear, they would be likely to have 
an interest in the framing of the bill. I claim the 
nuisance can be abated at much less expense, and 
that there is ample power to do so. Allow me for 
one moment to read from section 15 of the act of 
1878: 

"At the time and place appointed for the hear- 
ing, the Board of Health or health officer shall 
bear the parties, and after such hearing may 
cause such nuisance to be abated, according to 
his or their discretion; and for that purpose may 
enter and make such excavations, embankments 
and drains upon any lands, and under and across 
any streets and ways, as may be necessary for 
such abatement. They shall also determine in 
what manner and at whose expense the improve- 
ments made shall be kept in repair, and shall esti- 
mate and award the amount of damage sustained 
by and benefit accruing to any person by reason 
of such improvements, and what proportion of 



FEBRUARY 1<£. 18 7 8. 



64 



the expense of making and keeping the same in 
repair shall be borne by the city or town arid by 
any person benefited thereby. The damages so 
awarded shall be paid by the city or town, and 
there shall be assessed to the several persons 
benefited by such improvements, his proportion- 
ate part, to be ascertained as before provided, of 
the expense of making and keeping in repair such 
improvements, and the same shall be included in 
the next city or town taxes of such persons, and 
shall be a lien upon the real estate benefited 
thereby, and be collected in the same manner as 
other taxes upon real estate, and shall be liable 
to abatement as other taxes now are." 

Those are the provisions of the nuisance act 
which was passed for the purpose of abating nui- 
sances caused by wet lands, and it seems to me 
there is no necessity for further legislation. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I don't desire to 
enter into a controversy. I understand that the 
Board of Health have declined to enter upon this 
work under the present law. Any gentleman can 
see that it is useless to assess the Eastern Rail- 
road for tne cost of filling. Circumstances alter 
cases and law suits very materially, and it seems 
to me that the safest plan is to obtain the addi- 
tional legislation. 

Mr. Mowry— The city has a lien upon the land 
that is filled. 

Mr. Richardson— On land under tide water? 

Mr. Mowry— They propose to fill to grade ten, and 
then they would have a lien upon it. 

Mr. McGaragle — I find that I opposed this mat- 
ter under a misapprehension. It has been de- 
clared a nuisance, and I never so understood it 
before. I think we had better wait before we en- 
ter upon an expenditure of over $600,000. 

Mr. Day — The gentlemen assume that the ex- 
pense will be borne by the city. It has been de- 
clared a nuisance, and if the owners do not fill, 
the Board of Health can do it at their expense, 
If this state of things existed in Ward 11 it would 
have been abated years ago. 

Mr. Richardson said he believed the city should 
do all it can to avoid lawsuits, which is the object 
of this act. 

On motion of Mr. Spenceley ,"tbe main question 
Avas ordered. 

The order was passed— yeas 33, nays 32: 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Barry, Brown, B. Brint- 
nall, N. Y. Brintnail, Cannon, Clapp, Coe, Colby, 
Dantorth, Day, Devlin, Fernald, Flynn,Ham, Hib- 
bard, Hollis, Howland, Kelley, Kidney, Lauten, 
Lovering, McGahey, Pearl, Perham, J. B. Richard- 
son, Roberts, Sibley, Spenceley, Thorndike, Top- 
pan, Ward, Webster— 33. 

Nays — Messrs. Hill, Kendricken, McGaragle, 
McGeough, Mowry, Mullen, Nason, O'Connor, 
Plimpton, M. W. Richardson, Roach, Rust, E. H. 
Sampson, O. H. Sampson, H. N. Sawyer, N. Saw- 
yer, Smith, J. Taylor, Whicher, Wilson, Wolcott, 
Wyman- 22. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Brawley. Burke, 
Cox, Crocker, Denny, Doherty, Drynan, McDon- 
ald, Mullane, Pierce, Rosnosky, Santry, Shepard, 
J. F. Taylor, Thompson, Woolley— 16. 

Sent up. 

Mr. Kelley moved to adjourn. Lost. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

By Mr. Spenceley— Of Charles Russell Lowell 
Post, for leave to decorate Army and Navy Monu- 
ment on Decoration Day. Sent up. 

A petition was received from Lawrence Welby 
J'or postponement of election of SuDeriutendent 
of Streets. Indefinitely postponed on motion of 
Mr. Day. 

By Mr. Sawyer of Ward 18— Of J. Q. A. Haugh- 
ton for compensation for injuries from defective 
street. Referred to Committee on Claims. 

By Mr. Colby of Ward 18— Of Cornelius Lyncb 
for damages by defect in street. Referred to 
Committee on Claims. 

Of Isaac S. Reed, for abatement of tax. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Assessors' Department. 

By Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— Of Thomas 
Brown, for compensation for injuries by defect in 
Chardon street. Referred to Committee on 
Claims. 

By Mr. Brawley of Ward 19- Of Michael Kelley 
et al., for lamps on Rockingham place. 

Severally sent up. 

SCHOOLS. 

Requests were received from the School Com- 
mittee, for repairs in Chapman Schoolhouse and 
for suitable accommodations for East Boston 
Branch High School. Referred to Committee on 
Public Instruction. Sent up. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3 submitted a report from 
Committee on Public Library recommending the 
passage of an order — That his Honor the Mayor 
be requested to petition the General Court at its 
present session for the passage of an act incor- 
porating the Trustees of the Public Library of the 
city of Boston. Read twice and passed. Sent up. 

BACK BAY PARK. 

Mr. Sampscn of Ward 17 submitted a report 
from the Finance Committee with an order— That 
the Auditor of Accounts be, and he is hereby, au- 
thorized to transfer from the Reserved Fund to 
the appropriation for Public Park, Back Bay, the 
sum of $16,000. to be set apart for the payment 
for additional land to be purchased by the Park 
Commissioners for the Back Bay Park. 

Read once. 

HEREFORD STREET. 

Mr. Perham of Ward 23 submitted a report from 
the Joint Committee on Streets, recommending 
the passage of the resolve and order for the ex- 
tension of Hereford street, at an adjudged cost of 
$33,337.51. 

The resolve and order were passed to a second 
reading. 

In reply to Mr. Richardson of Ward 10, Mr. Per- 
ham said the street was needed for the line 
of the improved sewerage. 

Mr. Sampson corroborated the statement. 

The resolve and order were passed. Sent up. 

FIRST ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 11 submitted a report 
from the Committee on Assessors' Department, 
recommending the election of the following- 
named persons for First Assistant Assessors: Wil- 
liam J. Ellis, Joseph Robbins, George S. Pender- 
gast, William B. Long, Nahum Chapin, William 
M. Starrett, Michael Carney, John A. McLaugh- 
lin, Edward Riley, John Brown, Thomas J. An- 
derson, Horace Loring, Emerson Coolidge, Dudley 
Pray, Joseph L. Drew, Francis James, Joseph R. 
Gross, Thomas Leavitt, Charles R. Hunt, Theoph- 
ilus Burr, William B. Smart, G. F. Williams, L. 
Foster Morse, A. J. Brown, J. H. Griegs, George 
A. Comins, Gideon Walker, C. E. Temple, John 
Pierce, Henry Pierce, Charles Nowell, Richard B. 
Smart, and William A. Wheeler. Report accept- 
ed in concurrence. Sent up. The nominations 
were laid over under the rules. 

POLICE AND LICENSE COMMISSION. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 moved to take from 
the table the report and order in regard to peti- 
tion for License and Police Commission. 

Mr. McGaragle moved to adjourn. 

Declared carried ; vote doubted by Messrs Web- 
ster of Ward 3 and Crocker of Ward 9, and yeas 
and nays ordered on motion of Mr. Sampson of 
Ward 13. 

Yeas— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnail, 
N. Y. Brintnail, Burke, Cannon, Devlin, Doherty, 
Fernald, Flynn, Kelley, Kidney, Lauten, Lover- 
ing, McDonald, McGahey, McGaragle, McGeough, 
Mullen, Pearl, Roach, Roberts, Rosnosky, 
Spenceley, J. Taylor, Thorndike, Toppan, Wool- 
ley— 28. 

Nays — Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Coe, 
Colby, Crocker, Dantorth, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, 
Hollis, Howland, Kendricken, Mowry, Nason, 
Perham, Plimpton, J. B. Richardson, M. W. 
Richardson, Rust, E. H. Sampson, O. H. Samp- 
son, H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, Sibley, 
Smith, J. F. Taylor, Ward, Webster, Wilson, 
Wolcott, Wyman— 33. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Cox, Day, Denny, 
Drynan, Mullane, O'Connor, Pierce, Santry, 
Thompson, Whicher— 10. 

Mr. Sampson said his reason for making the 
motion was the short time allowed for presenting 
petitions to the General Court. 

Mr. Barry said this was the time to discuss it, 
and the Legislature will receive any petition 
from the city. 

Mr. McGaragle moved to assign to next meet- 
ing. 

The motiou to take from the table was declared 
carried. Mr. Spenceley doubted the vote and on 
his motion the yeas and nays were ordered. The 
motion prevailed— yeas 31, nays 29: 

Yeas — Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Coe, 
Colby, Crocker, Danforth, Ham, Hibbard, Hill. 
Hollis, Howland, Lauten, Mowry, Nason, Per- 
ham, Plimpton, J. B. Richardson, M. W. Rich, 
ardson, Rust, E. H. Sampson, O. H. Sampson, 
H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, Smith, J. F. 
Taylor, Ward, Webster. Wolcott, Wyman -35. 



65 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Nays— Messrs. Barry, Brawley. B. Brintnall, X- 
Y. Briutnall, Burke, Cannon, Devlin, Doherty, 
Fernald, Flynn, Kelley, Kendricken, Kidney, 
Lovering, McGahey, McU-aragle, McGeough, 
Mullen, Pearl, Roach, Rosnosky. Sibley, Spence- 
ley, J. Taylor, Thorndike, Toppan, Whicher. Wil- 
son, Wool'ley— 29. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Cox, Day, Den- 
ny, Drynau, McDonald, Mullane, O'Connor, 
Pierce, Roberts, Santry, Thompson— II. 

Mr. Rosuosky of Ward 16 moved to adjourn. 



Mr. Barry called for the yeas and nays. 

The President— The Chair decides that motion 
out of order, as it is dilatory. 

The motion to adjourn was declared carried. 

Mr. Crocker doubted the vote, and called for the 
yeas and nays. 

The President— The Chair thinks that it is dila 
tory. 

The motion to adjourn was carried by a divi- 
sion— 31 for. 30 against— and the President declared 
the Council adjourned. 



66 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY 18, 1878. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M.. Alder- 
man Stebbins, Chairman, presiding. 



JURORS DRAWN. 

Six traverse jurors were drawn for the January 
term of the Superior Court, Urn session. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To the Committee on l'avin>j. C. J. Speuceley 
et al., that West Walnut park, Ward 23, be graded 
and put in order for public travel; Asa P. Potter 
et al-, that Fairfield street, between Common- 
wealth avenue and Boylston street, be put in order 
tor travel; John Conuess et al.. that River street, 
Ward 24, be put in order for travel. 

To the Committee on Common, etc. T. A. 
Splaiue, for leave to place boats upon the Public- 
Garden Pond. 

To the Committee on Sewers. C. W. Stevens, et 
al., for a sewer in Cottage street, Charlestown. 

To the Committee <>» Licenses. Robinson & 
Enierton, to run two passenger wagons from Hay- 
market square to Rowe's and Litchfield's wharves; 
George W. Calef for leave to run two excursion 
wagons from Bowdoin square through certain 
streets to Rowe's, Litchfield and India wharves 
and return : Colman & Wellington, for leave to 
run two passenger wagons from Bowdoin square 
to Rowe's wbart. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of the 
Board. Petition for leave to occupy stables by 
Oakes Ames, new wooden, one horse, Clapp street, 
Ward 15; Mary Jane Wood, new wooden, one 
horse, 834-836 Albany street; C. L. Smith, old brick 
building, thirty horses, 99-101 West Canton street; 
Nason & Littlefipld, new wooden, seven horses, 
118, 120 and 122 Medtord street; A. Klaeger, new 
wooden, one horse, Longwood avenue, rear 112; 
Samuel G. Reed, old wooden, two cows and one 
horse, Phillips street. 

To Committee to Nominate Inspector of Light- 
en. Redmond Cookey, for appointment as a 
Weigher and Inspector of Lighters. 

To the Committee on Lamps. Michael Kelly et 
al., tor lamps m Rockingham place; William H. 
Bangs, Jr., et at., that Sawyer avenue, Dorches- 
ter, be lighted. 

To the Committee on Police. A. E. Alden, for 
leave to suspend a canvas sign at 503 Washington 
street. 

To the Joint Committee on Claims. H. P. Tal- 
lant, tor compensation tor injury to property and 
damage caused by location of smallpox hospital 
at Marcella-street Almshouse. 

To the Boston Hater Board. Frederick Pease 
et al., tor larger water pipes in the territory in 
East Boston between Saratoga and Monmouth 
streets. 

I.YNN & BOSTON RAILROAD. 

A hearing was had on the petition of the Lynn 
& Boston Railroad Company for leave to run cars 
from Haymarket square on Washington street, 
through Temple place and Tremont street. 

W. W. Warren appeared for the petitioners and 
C. A. Richards for the Metropolitan Railroad Co. 

Mr. Warren said there were petitions of citizens 
and ladies of Chelsea and business firms in Bos- 
ton in aid of this petition. The company ask 
to run only five cars per hour over this route; 
they carry about 1000 passengers per day. It is 
presented to accommodate the residents of Chel- 
sea who feel that they ought to be carried farther 
to the business portion of the city. 

Mr. Breed, President of the company, corrobo- 
rated what Mr. Warren said in regard to the de- 
mand for the accommodation. 

Alderman Hayden oresented petitions in aid 
signed by W. H. Hart and 163 citizens of Chelsea 
doing business in Boston; Jordan, Marsh & Co. 
and 109 business firms on Washington street, 
Temple place and Tremont street; 163 citizens of 
Chelsea doing business in Boston; George C. Boy- 
den and 94 citizens of Chelsea and patrons of the 
road; Mrs. Levi Slade and 312 ladies of Chelsea. 

Mayor Stebbins of Chelsea said he appeared at 
the urgent request of a large number of his con- 
stituents who desired the accommodation of being 



brought nearer the centre of business in Boston. 
The road had been operated seventeen years, and 
had never troubled the Mayor and Aldermen but 
once before this. 

Mr. Dix of Chelsea said the people of that city 
would greatly appreciate the accommodation, and 
it is really a necessity. They had talked of the 
matter tor tour or five years, and had brought a 
pressure upon the company. He had heard it 
estimated that 10,000 persons pass back and forth 
between the two cities every day. Ladies and 
children prefer the cars to the ferry. 

Alderman Tenney of Chelsea thought the ad- 
dition of five cars per hour would not hinder pub- 
lic travel. 

Ex-Alderman Roberts of Chelsea said it would be 
a great convenience not only to ladies, but to busi- 
ness men who now walk from steam-railroad depots 
and ferry. He had tried the Metropolitan Rail- 
road, but the trip was too long for a business man. 
[To Mr. Richards.] — It takes from ten minutes to 
a half hour longer by the Metropolitan Railroad, 
which has been a benefit to Chelsea, having 
caused the other road to reduce fares. The strong 
objection of ladies is to changing at the ferries. 

Mr. Warren said he had a long list of witnesses, 
but would not take up the time r,f the Board by 
cumulative evidence. 

Mr. Richards, President of the Metropolitan 
Railroad Company, said he appeared in no spirit 
of opposition excepi to protect the interest of his 
own road, over whose tracks the petitioners de- 
sire to run cars. He read section 12, chapter 29 of 
the general horse railroad laws, to show that the 
petitioners had to prove that public necessity and 
convenience demand this location. He could 
bring any number of petitions in favor of allow- 
ing auy extra accommodation the Metropolitan 
Railroad Company might ask lor. The petition- 
ers ask to run cars over the "disputed ground,'' 
the most crowded part of the city, the relief of 
which was provided lor last year by laying the ad- 
ditional track in a portion of Washington street. 
The Metropolitan had been driven about far 
enouehfrom their own tracks and business. This 
is a modest petition for five cars an hour; but 
if the gate is once opened, the result will 
be the same as in that of tne Middlesex road, 
there will be twelve cars an hour asked for. The 
gate went up, and you can't get it down with 
squeezing under it eighteen cars full of Charles- 
town. If this petition is granted, he predicted 
that the company would be here a year hence 
with a petition for twelve cars an hour. He pro- 
tested "against these out-of-town roads coming 
into the city on the track of and taking business 
from the Metropolitan road. In a short time, the 
Metropolitan will make as quick time from Chel- 
sea as the Lynn & Boston does now. Abutters on 
Washington street feel that 141 cars an hour are 
enough, and he predicted that that street would 
soon be as much crowded as Tremont street. The 
Cambridge road wants to kill off Mr. Stiles's 
omnibus line. The Lynn & Boston road would 
never have thought of this petition had not the 
Metropolitan road run its cars to Chelsea. 

Mr. Warren, in closing the case for the petition- 
ers, asked the Board to look at the question in a 
light different from that of corporate rights. 
Horse railroads were created as a means of pro- 
moting the use of highways in the interest of pub- 
lic convenience and necessity. Highways are not 
laid out for the use of the residents of any one 
city or town, but tor the general public. Avery 
large majority of the people in Chelsea do busi- 
ness in Boston, help pay its taxes, and contribute 
to its prosperity ; and they are to be considered 
just as much the residents of the city proper. 
Very many empty cars run on the circuit during 
the day, but he would no say that any company ran 
more cars than were necessary, merely to occupj 
the streets. There are thickly-settled sections in 
all directions from City Hall; and rhe fact is that 
the streets have been occupied by cars accommo- 
dating residents from only one or two of these 
outlying districts. The duty of the Board is to 
deal out the accommodations equally for all; they 
should not discriminate against any one section, 
and should equalize the use of the highways. 
This is a simple case; the petitions represent the 
most respectable people in Chelsea, and the only 
opposition is from the Metropolitan road, who 
wish to protect what they term their chartered 
rights ; but the duty of the Board is to make each 
company perform its duty as a servant of the 
public. 

The petition was recommitted to the Committee 
on Paving, on motion of Alderman Whidden. 



FEBRUARY 18, 1878. 



67 



METROPOLITAN RAILROAD. 

A hearing was given on the petition of the 
Metropolitan Railroad Company, for additions to 
its tracks on Boylston and Clarendon streets. 

Mr. Richards explained that it was to make 
quicker tiine on the Back Bay line. 

Newton Talbot opposed the double track in 
Clarendon street, as the people could be conven- 
ienced l>y a track in other streets. This new track 
will necessitate the paving of the street by the 
city, whereas the present pavement would last 
several years. The company would consult their 
own convenience by taking a track in Berkeley or 
Dartmouth street. 

Mr. Richards said there were formidable ob- 
jections to laying; a track in Dartmouth street. 
The company had tracks in other macadamized 
streets, and the paving between the tracks need 
not necessitate the paving of the whole street. 
He did not expect to meet so formidable an oppo 
nent as the chairman of the Street Commission- 
ers. 

Mr. Talbot said he lived on Clarendon street, 
and appeared as an abutter, and not as chairman 
of the Board of Street Commissioners. The Dart- 
mouth-street route would give better accommoda- 
tions to the patrons of the road. 

The petition was recommitted to the Committee 
on Paving. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Inspector of Provisions, Faneuil Hall Market 
— George E. McKay. Continued. 

Inspector of Provisions and Superintendent of 
Faneuil Hail— John H. Terry. Laid over for one 
week, on motion of Alderman Viles, who said this 
was a new man and he desired time to investigate. 

Superintendent of Printing, for three years — 
George Coolidge. Confirmed by ballot — 11 tor, 
against. Sent down. 

Special Police Officers— Joseph G. Stark, Jr. 
and William Beck. Confirmed. 

Weigher of Coal— Jeremiah J. Callahan. Con- 
firmed. 

Funeral Undertaker— Alexis Alexander and sev- 
eral others (reappointments). Confirmed. 

PETITION FOR STEAM ENGINE. 

A petition was received from H. M. Richards & 
Co., for license to erect and use a steam engine at 
14 Cbardon street, and an order of notice was 
passed for a hearing thereon on Monday, March 
11, at 4 P.M. 

HARBOR MASTER. 

The report and order to accept chapter 64 of the 
acts of 1802 (See Statutes and Ordinances, page 
360, section 24) was considered under unfinished 
business. 

Alderman Viles — 1 regret that the Alderman 
who offered that report and order is absent, but 
in his absence I will endeavor to explain it to the 
Board. The committee met to consider the ex- 
pediency of consolidating the Harbor Master's 
boat, the police boat and the tire boat. We first 
considered the fire boat, and had before us the 
chairman of the Board of Fire Commissioners, 
Captain Chamberlin, and he utterly proiest- 
ed against hampering the fire boat, with 
any duties other than those that she has 
now. He demonstrated that by her work at 
two fires during the past two months 
she had more than paid for herself. He 
demonstrated her usefulness so satisfactorily that 
the committee were satisfied on that score. We 
next considered the police boat, and the Chief 
of Police testified that she traversed the harbor 
and protected millions of property, and that in 
case of fires on the water front she responded to 
the alarms and played two powerful streams. He 
showed that at the last fire in Charlestown she 
more than paid for herself. Last summer she re- 
covered two bodies from drowning, and in the 
summer season she has often been called upon to 
quell disturbances on excursions in the harbor. 
We also had the Harbor Master before us. Cap- 
tain Cates is the most efficient Harbor Master we 
have had for several years; he is active, energetic 
and industrious. But the Chief and the Captain of 
Police Station 8 said that they could do all the 
auty that the Harbor Master does ; that the police 
boat traverses the harbor, going over the same 
route that the Harbor Master does. That they 
have three nautical men on board, and that the 
duties of Harbor Master can be performed by the 
Harbor Police without an extra farthing's cost to 
the city. In the face and eyes of those facts 
the committee thought that the only thing 
that the city could do was to accept the 
act passed in 1862 and appoint the Captain of 



the police boat as Harbor Master. He can be ap- 
pointed Harbor Master without pav, and the du- 
ties could be performed without extra expense. 
I am not familiar with the duties of Harbor Mas- 
ter, and perhaps the Alderman irom Charlestown, 
who is chairman of the committee, can explain 
them; but the committee thought it most wise to 
report as they did. 

Alderman McLean— Do I understand that the 
Harbor Master and the Captain of Police are to 
work in unison ? 

Alderman Viles— The duties of the offices are to 
be consolidated, and the Captain of the police 
boat could be appointed Harbor Master without 
pay. The first duty of the city, the City Solicitor 
said, is to accept this act. 

Alderman McLean— I am entirely in favor of 
consolidation, and I believe in accepting the act 
of 1862 which provides that — 

"The Harbor Master of the port of Boston shall 
hereafter be appointed by the Mayor and Alder- 
men of the city of Boston instead of the City 
Council of said city; and he shall continue to 
have all the powers and be subject to all the 
duties, liabilities and obligations which now ap- 
peitain by law to the said office." 

Alderman Wnidden — If I understand this, it is 
only the acceptance of the act at the present time. 

Alderman Viles — That is all. 

The Chairman — The Harbor Master is now elect- 
ed by the City Council, and if the order is adopt- 
ed he will be appointed by the Mayor and con- 
firmed by the Board of Aldermen. 

The order was passed. Sent down. 

CHARLES RIVER FLATS. 

The report and order for Mayor to petition the 
Legislature for an act to cede the Charles River 
flats in rear of Beacon and Charles streets to the 
city were considered under Unfinished business. 

Alderman Guild — I made some explanation with 
regard to this order at the last meeting of the 
Board, and have had opportunities since then to 
explain it to some of the msmbers; and I merely 
wish to say at this time that this petition to the 
Legislature of Massachusetts is simply for the 
purpose of obtaining these flats for sanitary pur- 
poses. While they remain in the possession of the 
State of Massachusetts, the city is perpetually 
menaced with an attempt that may be made by 
the State to utilize the property for its own 
profit. Of course it is very natural that 
those who are legislating for the pecuniary 
prosperity of the State to look in every direc- 
tion where that utility can be forwarded; 
but at the present time there is a feeling 
that whatever can be done to advance the sani- 
tary condition of the capital of the State should 
be done. I beg to say that, so far as I am con- 
cerned at present in advocating this order, it is 
purely for these reasons. The necessity for 
the preservation of this open space was 
more especially developed by the Park Com 
missioners, who looked in that direction for a 
park, and the danger which would arise from the 
tilling up of the State flats was brought more con- 
spicuously to the attention of the citizens of Bos- 
ton, and therefore this course of action was 
thought to be necessary. If gentlemen will cast 
their eyes over this map, they will see a green 
line, which indicates a space of about two hun- 
dred feet from the line, which is in rhe rear of 
Charles and Beacon streets. This two hundred 
feet and outwards is what the Mayor desires in 
his recommendation to the City Council the city 
should petition for the Legislature of Massachu- 
setts to cede to the city of Boston. The flats 
which belong to the State come up very near to 
the line of what is now the extreme line at the 
rear of Beacon and Charles streets; and attempts 
have already been made by parties who desire to 
improve that territory for their own business or 
speculative purposes, to endeavor to have the 
State grant them that privilege. I have in my 
hand a slip cut irom a paper a short time since, 
which records a vote that — 

"On motion of Mr. Bird of Walpole, that the 
Committee on Public Lands inquiie and report 
whether any, and if so what, portion of the Com- 
lnonwealth'fiats in the Charles River basin, north 
of Beacon street, can properly be tilled, what 
would be the cost of such tilling, and what would 
be the probable value of said fiats when tilled, 
and generally what will be the best method of 
filling and disposing of the same for the best in- 
terests of the Ccmmonwealth." 

I have here another map which may be suggest- 
ive to the gentlemen of the Board as to the neces- 



68 



BOARD OF ALDERMEJN 



sity of keeping those flats open for the sanitary 
condition of the city. The green space we petition 
to have ceded to the city is shown by a line run- 
ning up close to the city of Boston as near as 
possible; then it leaves an open space; and it is 
proposed to utilize this open space on the other 
side, and therefore it will leave only a small nar- 
row open estuary as it were of Charles River 
runuing between, and which I need not call your 
attention, as practical business men, that any 
such movement as this woula so materially im- 
pair the value of taxable property as to almost 
ruin and entirely change the character of that 
part of the city. That is the only open frontage 
■we have now wlieie a good and' unimpaired cur- 
rent of Iresh air can come in. 1 am informed 
that it has been learned at the State House that 
the Commonwealth are disposed favorably to deal 
with the city at this time. Certainly it cat; do us 
no harm to ask for this, if there is a reasonable 
hope of getting it. I therefore advocate this 
order in "good faith, aud hope the Board will 
warrant the Mayor in making this petition. 

alderman McLean— I cannot allow this to n 
without entering my protest against it. While 
the chairman of the committee says it all in 
faith, so far as he is concerned, I am willing to 
accept this explanation. Bur 1 think this is a 
matter we oueht not to take hold of. It. would be 
a very expensive thing even though the State 
should give us this L:rant without charge. It is not 
to be presumed that il this is given to us the city 
of Boston will be allowed to let it remain there 
without improvement. The gentleman says there 
is no expense attached to this order. That is all 
very well. But every member of the Board knows 
that an extravagant scheme for parks lias been 
put before the city, and in order to carry it out a 
sop has lit en thrown to every other section of the 
city where there is any extensive population. I 
am" willing to accept and develop, as soon as we 
can afford to, the scheme for a Hack Hay park, 
although I don't believe we can afford to do so 
just now or in tii" immediate future; bur so far as 
I am concei tied 1 am willing to put aside so much 
every year as the city can afford to be taxed for 
to improve it. lint, 1 do not want any more public 
debt created tor parks. This '200 teet around that 
portion of the city is a part of the schemes which 
have been presented, and there will be a pressure 
to have it improved. I did have a lew notes 
upon this matter, hut I left them at home; 
but I take some figures from the speech 
of Alderman Burrage, which I believe to be 
correct. The commissioners estimate that this 
very land would cost solO.000. It is hardly to be 
supposed that the State would give us 8510,000. 
Now the cost of tilling to grade seventeen is esti- 
mated at SI, 477,1 (iO; and then the cost of the sea 
wall, about which I had the honor to ask the 
Alderman at the last meeting, I rind that will lie 
14,520 leet, at S150 per runuing loot, §2,178,000, 
making in all $4,135,160, The Alderman took oc- 
casion to say that nothing of this kind was asked 
for at all. 

Alderman Guild— It is not asked for at all. 

Alderman McLean— That is so; but I have a 
right to assume that it will be in the future. If 
this graut is obtained from the State there are in- 
terested parties who will drive the city to 
an expenditure of two millions and a half atleast, 
for an expensive sea wall around those flats. The 
Park Commissioners have not taken into consid- 
eration the water rights of those people owning 
property there, which must cause a large 
expenditure in addition to this park. While I am 
as anxious for parks as any one, provided they 
cost us nothing, or they come within our means, 
at present the burdens already imposed upon our 
people are sucb that I am opposed to placing 
such a one upon them, and I must vote against 
anything that squints at any extravagance in the 
future. I am sure that just as soon as this is ob- 
tained, the public mind will be worked up so that 
we shall be called upon to make large expendi- 
tures for the development of this little strip of 
flats. When we are able to pay for it we can get 
it and pay for it. By asking tor this tract I don't 
want to commit the city of Boston to the develop- 
ment of this thing. 1 had hoped that this Board 
would look at this matter deliberately. It is very 
easy to ask for something that costs us nothing 
at first, but which will cost a very large amount 
in the future. We shall have all the water there is 
today, even if the State should not give us this 
grant. I confess that I am imperfectly prepared 
to oppose this thing; nevertheless I feel that it is 
a step we ought not to take, even if it costs us 



nothing. You remember that l'oor Richard said, 
"Anything is dear that we do not need, even if it 
costs nothing." 

Alderman l' aunce — I am not prepared to make 
a speech upon this matter; it is not in my line. 
We want those flats to prevent the putting of a 
wall there, as I understand, so that we will have 
that water park open, so that we shall not be 
called upon to spend the sum the Alderman has 
named . We do not propose, by this order, to buy 
a loot of land ; ami what we ask for comprises a 
very large portion of the land that they want to 
put a wall upon. 1 agree with the Alderman that 
we don't want a wall there. There is a large open 
water-front— what we want is to prevent the 
State from building it up and making 
busine-s streets tor the railroads. The 
gentleman says that a pressure may be brought 
to bear in the future, we are not responsible for 
that. My object is to keep that water-front open. 

Alderman McLean — Does the gentleman expect 
the State to grant this without some condition as 
to its improvement? 

Alderman Faunce— If the State does n't grant it 
without conditions we need n't accept it. 

Alderman Whidden— I should like very much 
for the city to have control of that strip of land: 
but, as the Alderman on my left has said, it is an 
opening for something else. Unquestionably that 
Strip of laud does not embrace all that is included 
in the park scheme, but to make it what it is in- 
tended to be in the future, it will have to cover 
a part of this territory which is laid out. 
I believe in the propriety of beautify- 
ing Boston and taking care of any waste 
places that may be around the city and 
making it not only unobjectionable, but attractive 
and healthy; but 1 cannot agree with the neces- 
sity for borrowing money at the present time, 
for the city has about reached the limit of its 
power for creating indebtedness. I am a little 
puzzled to know how to vote upon it, and to be 
sure, I think 1 shall vote against it. I know 
from my own knowledge, and from all the 
Circumstances attending the park movement, 
that this boule\ a rd is as much desired as the pres- 
ent Back Bay purchase; audit these flats are ob- 
tained, 1 have n't the leastdoubt but that a move- 
ment will be made to improve it in that direction; 
and therefore I shall object to it. 

Alderman McLean called for the yeas and nays, 
and the order was passed— yeas 7, nays 4: 

Yeas— Aldermen Faunce, Guild, Harris, Hayden. 
Slade, Stebbins, Whiton— 7. 

N'avs — Aldermen McLean, Robinson. Yiles, 
Whidden— 4. 
It down. 

IXLAKKOl.- I'APEHS FROM Till: COMMON 
0O1 (TOIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Requests from School Committee for certain re- 
pairs on the Chapman Schoolhouse, and for suita- 
ble accommodations for the East Boston branch 
of the Girls' High School. Referred to the Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction in concurrence. 

The order to consider the expediency of allow- 
ing the Principal Assessors to appoint their sec- 
ond assistants came up referred to the Committee 
on the Assessors' Department. Concurred. 

Report and order lor Mayor to petition Legisla- 
ture ior the incorporation ot the Trustees of the 
Boston Public Library. Order passed in concur- 
rence. 

Report and order to fix the salary of the clerk 
of the Park Commissioners at S1150 per annum. 
Order passed in concurrence. 

Report Of Board ol Health on subject of peti- 
tion lor an act giving the city authority to fill the 
.Mill Pond flats. Placed on file. 

Order lor Mayor to petition for the authority 
above recited. Passed in concurrence. 

Report of Board of Health on estimated cost of 
filling the Mill Pond flats. Placed on file. 

II nn.li>i:li-si i;i i;i I \ i I \SION. 

A report came up with resolve and order to ex- 
tend Hereford street at an adjudged cost of 
$33,337.50. 

The question was upon the passage of the re- 
solve and order in concurrence. 

Alderman Whidden— I would like some infor- 
mation upon the laying out of streets upon the 
Back Bay. I hail an impression that those 
streets were laid out by the State and the Water 
Power Company. I don't understand why it is 
that the city has to purchase these estates at tne 
present time, and I would like to have It ex- 
plained. 



FEBRUARY 16 



1878 



69 



Alderman Harris — Two objects are contem- 
plated by this order. First, to carry out the plan 
of the streets on the Back Bay which the com- 
missioners desire to see executed; and second, to 
facilitate the construction of the improved sew- 
erage, so that it can go through this new street 
and thousands of dollars be saved. That was the 
manner in which it was presented to the Committee 
on Streets, and 1 suppose the Alderman was fully 
acquainted with the fact that it was for that pur- 
pose more than any other, and that a portion of 
the expense comes from the appropriation for 
Improved Sewerage. The plan commended itself 
to the committee, and they submitted it to the 
City Council. 

Alderman Whidden — That does n't reach the 
point that I wanted to ascertain— why the city is 
obliged to purchase land for a street there. I 
had an impression that these streets were all laid 
out by the State and the Water Power Company. 
If this is a deviation from the original plan that 
is another thing. 

Alderman Harris — The gentleman labors under 
a misapprehension. The Street Commissioners, 
who are the most economical commission in City 
Hall, have looked carefully into this matter. 

Alderman McLean — Do I understand that the 
whole of this is to be charged to the appropriation 
for Streets? or whether one-half is to be paid 
from the appropriation for Improved Sewer- 
age ? 

Alderman Harris — The sum named in the order 
covers the entire expense. I cannot .state the ex- 
act Droportion to be assumed by the Committee 
on Improved Sewerage. It is neither a third nor a 
half, but a proportionate sun, as 50 is to 125, I 
think. 1 am informed that the price of a portion 
of the land is $1.25 a foot, of which the Commit- 
tee on Improved Sewerage pay fifty cents. For 
another portion we pay $1 a foot, and the com- 
mittee of which the gentleman is chairman as- 
sumes one-half. What the exact figures will 
amount to in dollars and cents I cannot tell. 

Alderman Whidden — My question is whether 
the State or the Water Power Company does not 
contribute these streets, and whether the city is 
not obliged to come in at this time ?nd buy those 
streets which are supposed to be laid out by one or 
the other of those parties or both. 

Alderman Harris— This land belongs to neither 
the Water Power Company nor the State. It be- 
longs to private individuals. 

Alderman Whidden — That answers the question. 

The resolve and order were passed in concur- 
rence with the Common Council and the Street 
Commissioners. 

REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 

The annual report of the City Engineer, (City 

Document) was received. Sent down. 
The following is a statement of the engineering 

expenses from Jan. 1, 1877, to Jan. 1, 1878: 

Amount expended from de- 
partment appropriation for 
1876-7 §7,721.70 

Amount expended from depart- 
ment appropriation for ■ 
1877-8 16,602.25 

Total expended from depart- 
ment appropriations $24,323.95 

Amount expended from special 
and other appropriations 4,477.73 

Total 828,801.68 

Condition of department appropriation: 

Amount of appropriation for financial vear 
1877-8 $25,479.00 

Amount expended to Jan. 1, 1878 16,602.25 

Unexpended balance, Jan. 1, 1878 $8,876.75 

The usual annual examination of all the bridges 
within the city limits, open to team and foot 
travel, has been made, and the results of this ex- 
amination respecting the condition of the 
bridges as to safety, and need of renewal or re- 
pairs, are as follows: 

As one result of this examination in connection 
with the careful inspection of the Columbus-ave- 
nue and Albany-street bridges, for which an ex- 
cellent opportunity was afforded by the removal 
of the first and the repairs made on the second 
structure, it may be stated that, unless the iron 
bridges over railroads are kept thoroughly paint- 
ed, their destruction from the corrosive effects of 
the soft-coal smoke from locomotives will be very 
rapid. The city owns fourteen of these bridges, 
and attention has been called in every annual re- 
port of this department to the necessity of paint- 



ing many, if not most, of those in existence at the 
time; yet itis seldom, if ever, thoroughly done. 
By thoroughly done, I mean that the portions of 
the iron work below the floor or covered by the 
wood work are not scraped and painted, as they 
should be. 

In the lower chords of the Albany-street bridge 
trusses, plates of iron, originally one-fourth of an 
inch thick, were found to have but one-half of 
this thickness of sound iron, and the extent to 
which this deterioration has proceeded on sur- 
faces not accessible renders the actual strength 
of the structure a matter of conjecture rather 
than of reasonable certaintv. This bridge was 
built in 1867; other iron bridges built later are in 
many cases badly corroded, although not to the 
extent of this one. 

It has been stated in a former report, and I re- 
peat it here as applying to all such bridges main- 
tained by the city, "that as often as once in two 
years, perhaps oftener, these bridges should be 
stripped of their flooring, and the iron work be 
thoroughly cleaned and painted." 

Dartmouth-street Bridge. This bridge should 
be rebuilt the present year. It has been strength- 
ened and patched in various ways until it may be 
said to be a combination of the various styles of 
bridge construction. A great deal of the wood 
work is very rotten, and it is impossible, without 
taking the bridge wholly apart, to determine to 
what extent its strength has been diminished. 

The borings and data for designing a new struc- 
ture at this point have been procured, and some 
progress has been made on the plans, an order 
having been given by a former Committee on 
Paving to this department to prepare plans for 
the rebuilding of the bridge. Cost of borings was 
$ 186.75. Cost of repairs for the year, $156.99. 

Dover-street Bridyc. This bridge was opened 
for travel Jan. 29, 1877, it having been closed, on 
account of rebuilding, since July 24, 1876. A gen- 
eral description of the new structure was given in 
the report of last vear; its total cost was $88,- 
744.56. 

A building containing an office, sleeping rooms 
and a repair shop, has been erected on the wharf 
built for this purpose, adjoining the pier; it cost 
$1675.79. 

A settlement has been effected with Mr. Win- 
sor, the owner of a coal-run, which was taken 
down by the city's agents at the time the bridge 
was being rebuilt, and stored in a coal shed, where 
it was destroyed by fire. The amount paid was 
$650. The bridge is now in good condition ; ouly 
ordinary repairs have been made. Total cost of 
repairs was $763.28. 

FIRST ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Early in the session, on motion of Alderman 
Harris, the rule was suspended, and the Board 
proceeded to the consideration of the report, 
which came up among the papers from the other 
branch, nominating First Assistant Assessors. 
The report was accepted in concurrence, and an 
election ordered. Committee— Aldermen Harris, 
Hay den. 

As the committee were about to collect the bal- 
lots, Alderman Robinson moved areconsideration. 
The question was put and declared lost. Alderman 
McLean doubted the vote, and said the request 
was a reasonable one. He had been compelled to 
look over the lists of candidates very hastily, and 
was not exactly satisfied with what he had seen. 
He could stand the pressure a week longer, and 
then do as he pleased when the trial comes to 
vote. 

Aldermen Guild opposed laying the matter over 
for a week, but favored laying the election over 
temporarily. 

The reconsideration prevailed. 

Subsequently, on motion of Alderman Robin- 
son, the Board proceeded to an election. Com- 
mittee—Aldermen Harris, Hayden. A recess was 
taken, at the end of which the committee report- 
ed the result as follows: 

"Whole number of votes n 

Necessary for a choice q 

l Those marked with stars were elected.! 

♦William J. Ellis n 

Joseph Bobbins i 

♦George S. Pendergast 11 

♦William B. Long n 

*Nahum Chapin .". n 

♦William N. Starrett <i 

♦Michael Carney 8 

John A. McLaughlin 3 

Edward Riley 5 

♦John Brown 10 

Thomas J. Anderson 4 

♦Horace Loring 11 



70 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Emerson Coolidge ."> 

Dudley Pray .". 

•Joseph L. Drew 8 

Francis James 5 

'Joseph K. Grope l> 

•Thomas Leavitt 11 

♦Charles 1$. Hunting 8 

'Theophilus Burr 10 

'William B. Smart 10 

►George !•'. Williams 10 

*L. Foster Morse B 

'Andrew J. Browne 11 

'John H. Griggs 10 

orge A. Coinins lo 

•Gideon Walker 11 

'Charles E. Temple 11 

'John Pierce 11 

'Hen rv Pierce 11 

'Charles Nowell 11 

►Richard B. Smart 11 

•William A. Wheeler 11 

•John 11. Duaiie 8 

•Artemas R. Holden 10 

'William H. Candy 9 

.loii n Leahy 1 

•John H. Giblin 10 

•John McElroy 6 

i lies E. Grant 8 

W. G. Train 4 

John Noble 4 

Dennis Moore S 

Phinehas B. Pierce 1 

•Phinelias B. Smith 7 

Qeorge Kingman 1 

rge H. Kingman I 

Sent clown. 

BONDS W'1'U(>\ i:i). 

The bonds of N illiani S. Post <t «L, constables, 
being presented duly certified, were approved by 
the Board. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Guild submitted reports from the 
Committee on Licenses as follows: 

Minors' Applications Granted— Fifty newsboys. 

Amusement License Granted— J. \V. C'adwell, 
to give mesmeric exhibitions at Rochester Hall, 
730 Washington street, for four weeks, commenc- 
ing Feb. 18; S. Taylor, to give an athletic exhibi- 
tion at Music Hall. March 11, under the supervi- 
sion ot the poll c. 

Auctioneer's License Refused— C. H. Starkey, 
30 Cambridge street. 

Victualler Licensed— Lucia A. Stewart, 80 Shaw- 
mut avenue. 

Dealer in Second-hand Articles Licensed— Mary 
Jane Carlton, 61 Shawmut avenue. 

Severally accepted. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

Alderman Fannce submitted a report from the 
Committee ou Public Lands, recommending the 
passage of an order— That the Collector be and he 
hereby is directed to cancel the bond numbering 
52, in the Suffolk-Street district, the amount of 
which is f3400, and given by Charles Reiiiliardt 
for an estate on Middlesex street, Nov. 2<), 1868, 
upon bis surrendering the agreement to convey 
the same; and that the Superintendent ot Public 
Lands be directed to issue a new agreement, with 
all the conditions as set forth in the previous one, 
upon the said Charles Keinhardt giving to the 
city a bond in tin: sum oi $3M6.94, made payable 
in "ten annual instalments, the fir.st instalment of 
.94 to be paid upon the signing of said bond, 
and nine annual instalments of $304 each, upon 
the 18th day ot February ol each year, until the 
full amount is paid, with interest at ti per cent., 
said bond to be dated Feb, 15, 1878. Read twice 
and passed. Sent down. 

MANAGEMENT OF THE I'l BLIC GROl Mis. 

Alderman Guild submitted the following: 
The Joint Standing Committee on Common anil 
Public Grounds, to whom was referred so much 
oi the address of his Honor the Mayor as relates 
to placing the public pleasure grounds under the 
Board ot Park Commissioners, having considered 
the subject, would respectfully report as tollows: 
The committee deem it for the best interests of 
the city that the Common and public grounds 
should be placed in charge of the Park Commis- 
sioners. They believe that such a permanent 
board (who will give their t'.me and best attention 
to the subject) can administer the duties required 
in a more efficient manner, anil that greater econo- 
my can be secured in the expenses of the depart- 
ment under said board than is possible under the 
supervision ot a joint committee of the City 
Council, which is, ot course, subject to radical 
change in its membership every year. The Park 
Commissioners are now intrusted with the pur- 
chase and laying out of such parks as the 



pur- 
City 



Council may from time to time make appropria- 
tions lor, and the land for one such park has al- 
ready been purchased and its immediate improve- 
ment is now in contemplation. Your committee 
are confident that in placing the Common and 
public grounds also under the same authority 
greater efficiency and economy will result to the 
city than in having iwo heads for the manage- 
ment of the public pleasure grounds, which in 
their opinion should be consolidated into a single 
department under the authority of one competent 
board to whom both the City Council and the 
public can look for a proper performance of 
the duties required. In order that the proposed 
changes maybe carried out, your committee re- 
spectfully recommend the passage of the accom- 
panying order : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances be 
requested to report an ordinance, or an amend- 
ment to existing ordinances, transferring the care 
of the Common and public grounds to the Board 
of Park Commissioners. 

Read once. 

- i LBLES. 

Alderman Yiles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Health on the part of the Board 
recommending that permits be granted to occupy 
stables by Sewall A. F iiince, Beach street; A E. 
McLaughlin. Centre street; S. L. Emery, Harley 
street; D. H. McKay, Newport street. Severally 
accepted. 

SEWERS. 

Alderman Viles, from the Committee on Sewers, 
submitted an order— That there be abated from 
the assessment levied upon Evelina A. Smith for 
a sewer in Dorchester avenue, on account of over- 
estimate of land ; also, that f 10.67 be abated from 
the assessment levied upon John G. Day for a 
sewer in School stieet ou account of overesti- 
mate ot land. 

\ ii.ir V BLR M LRKET. 

Alderman Slade ottered an order— That three 
members of this Board, with such as the Common 
Council may join, be a committee to consider the 
expediency ot purchasing the property known as 
the "Mercantile Wharl Market." Passed, and Al- 
dermen Slade, Viles and Harris were appointed on 
said committee. Sent dov\ n. 

MARKET. 

Alderman Slade offered an order— That the Su- 
perintendent of Faneuil Hall Markets be au- 
thorized to employ, subject to the approval of the 
Mayor, one deputy to assist him in the discharge 
of the duties of his office. Read twice and passed. 

PARK ON DARTMOl III AMD BOYLSTON STREETS. 

Alderman Slade offered an order— That the 
Committee on Common and Public Grounds be 
authorized to confer, in behalf of the City Council, 
with the Governor and Council of this Common- 
wealth, tor the conveyance to the city ot the par- 
cel of land on Dartmouth and Boylston streets, 
referred to and described in chapter 195 of the 
acts ol 1876, Pa<sed. Sent down. 

i: as r BOSTON II RKI i 

Alderman McLean submitted the following 
from the Joint Committee on East Boston Fer- 
ric-: 

Report on request of Directors of the Ferries in 
regard to purchase of a new ferry boat and sale of 
the General Grant; recommending the passage of 
orders, That the Board of Directors of Fast Bos- 
ton Ferries be and it, is hereby authorized to con- 
tract for a new ferry boat to be used on the East 
Boston Fen v lines, the cost thereof not to exceed 
the sum of % i:>,0()0; and, That the Board ot Direc- 
tors of East Boston .Ferries be and it is hereby au- 
thorized to sell by auction or private sale, as it 
may deem best for the interest of the city, the 
ferry boat General Grant, the proceeds of said 
sale to be paid to the City Collector. Read once. 

Report on order to consider the expediency of 
requesting the Street Commissioners to lay out 
the avenues from the ferry slips as public streets, 
recommending the passage of an order — That the 
Board of Street Commissioners be, and it is here- 
by requested to lay out as public streets the ave- 
nues leading from the ferry slips to Commercial 
and Sumner streets. Read once. 

Report on request of Directors of Ferries in re- 
gard to contract for fuel, recommending the pas- 
sage of an order— That the directors of East Bos- 
ton Ferries be authorized to contract for the fuel 
required for tbe Ferry Department during the 
next financial year; the amount of said contract 



FEB BXJ A Id Y 18 



1878. 



71 



to be paid from the appropriation for the finan- 
cial year 1878-79. Read once. 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Whidden submitted the following 
from the Committee on Paving: 

Reports of leave to withdraw on petitions of 
Leonard Ware et al., that Spear alley be repaved; 
L. Woodbury & Co., to run a wire rope for the 
transmission of power across Water street. Sev- 
erally accepted. 

Report that leave be granted M. Ellis & Co. to 
move wooden building from 301 to rear 337 Lex- 
ington street, Ward 1. Accepted. 

Report that no action is necessary on petition 
of Lawrence D. Welby et al., that the wages of 
laborers in the Paving Department be increased. 
Accepted. 

Report of leave to withdraw on petition of Ed- 
win R. Frost, to erect an illuminated clock upon 
outer edge of sidewalk of 109-111 Devonshire 
street. 

Alderman Harris— I hope the committee will be 
able to give some reason why they refuse to grant 
a person liberty to place an illuminated clock in 
the street. My idea is it will certainly be very 
convenient to passers-by, and I fail to see that it 
would cause any more obstruction than a simple 
gas lamp will make. There may be some reasons 
which induced the committee to report otherwise, 
and I should like to hear them. 

Alderman Whidden— The illuminated clock is 
not to be an illuminated clock, and that is one of 
the best reasons we can offer. It is simply a place 
to light a cigar, and by opening a valve or door 
to do so the time of day or night can be seen. The 
committee concluded it would be of no benefit to 
any one to enable them to see the time of day or 
night, unless they wanted to light a cigar, 

The report was accepted. 

REMOVAL OF OBSTRUCTIONS FROM THE STREETS. 

Alderman Whidden offered an order— That the 
Chief of Police be directed to enforce the ordinance 
now standing upon the records, in relation to ob- 
structions in the streets of Boston, by prosecution 
in court after due notice to those violating the 
same. 

Alderman Whidden— I will give a few reasons 
why that order was introduced. A portion of 
them have been drawn out by the petitions for 
extending the lines of horse railroads. As every 
member of the Board is aware, I presume, the or- 
dinance in regard to horse cars is violated con- 
tinually. They are run so close together that it is 
impossible to get between them, aud I have no 
doubt that if the police enforced the ordinance in 
regard to the running of horse cars, a great deal 
of the trouble would be abated and the 
streets relieved very much. There are 
other obstructions in the streets which 
ought to be removed. There are hawkers and 
riedlers and others who take up space in the 
streets. There is one individual clown here who 
stands in his coach selling books and collecting a 
crowd , and there are other obstructions that 
ought to be removed, aud I offer that order for 
the purpose of giving those wno have a right to 
pass through the streets a right to do so without 
unnecessary obstruction. 

Alderman Viles— I hope that will lie over one 
week. It is a question of considerable impor- 
tance. I will admit that there is considerable 
nuisance down there in the square. 

The order went over. 

CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 

Alderman Whidden offered an order— That his 
Honor the Mayor be requested to petition the 
Legislature to "relieve the city of Boston from 
maintaining any portion of the West Boston ami 
Craigie's bridges outside of the boundary line of 
the city of Boston. 

On motion of Alderman Whidden the order 
took its second reading and was put upon its pas- 
sage. 

Alderman Harris— For one, I cannot vote for 
that order tonight. The Alderman mentioned to 
me the other day that he contemplated introduc- 
ing such an order, but I have not had time to sat- 
isfy myself as to the peculiar arrangements now 
existing in regard to the maintenance of those 
bridges, and I dislike to place Boston in any posi- 
tion which we might regret. Therefore until I 
know more of what is intended I cannot vote for 
it. I know that this bridge question is a problem 
for us to solve, and that there is more or less ex- 
pense attending it; but still I maintain 
that after all Boston must have avenues 



for approach. We cannot afford to cut off 
these bridges and approaches to the city, and 
therefore we must meet the question. If there is 
any bargain or understanding or arrangement, I 
beiieve in abiding by it, the same as in the matter 
of Chelsea Bridge. From the fact that the city 
may lose in that matter, I don't think we ought to 
resent it by cutting off Cambridge. Therefore T 
cannot vote for it tonight. 

Alderman Slade— I should like to have the Al- 
derman tell us just how we stand in that respect 
at the present time ; how much of the bridges we 
support are in Cambridge, how it came about that 
we are supporting them, and what reason he has 
to think we can possibly get rid of it. We have 
had a little trial on Chelsea Bridge and been beat- 
en, and it seems to me we don't want to under- 
take another one unless we have a pretty fair 
show of being successful. 

Alderman Whidden--As I understand the divi- 
sion of West Boston Bridge at the present time, 
the city of Boston maintains about three-fifths of 
it, and about two-thirds of Craigie's Bridge. If 
it is equity that the city of Boston should have a 
portion of Chelsea Bridge foisted upon it to main- 
tain, I don't see why the equity should n't apply 
to these bridges. The divisions that have stood 
up to the present time have all been made by able 
commissioners and have been satisfactory, and no 
complaints have been made until Chelsea comes 
forward and petitions to be released from a cer- 
tain portion to the boundary line. If it is equity 
lor the Legislature to release Chelsea from main- 
taining that portion which has been maintained 
by Chelsea under the decision of the Legislature 
by a commission, I see no reason why it should 
n't apply to these bridges, and I offer the order in 
that feeling. 

Alderman McLean— What contract is there be- 
tween the city of Boston and Cambridge? Can 
the Alderman give that information ? There 
might be conditions about that which would 
induce me to vote for or against. I should like 
to know how the contract came about, so far as 
the two cities are concerned. 

Alderman Whidden — It was settled by an act of 
the Legislature to divide the cost of maintaining 
those bridges. 
Alderman McLean— Section 47 (page 79) says: 
"Under the provisions of chapter 302 of the 
acts of 1870, the Supreme Judicial Court ap- 
pointed three commissioners to apportion and 
assess upon the cities of Boston and Cambridge 
the expense of maintaining and keeping in repair 
West Boston and Cragie's, or Canal, bridges, and 
to divide the funds belonging to said bridges be- 
tween the two cities. The commissioners having 
made their award, and the same having been ac- 
cepted by the court, the city of Cambridge paid 
over to the city of Boston, in compliance there- 
with, the amount of funds apportioned there- 
under; and the two cities then appointed, as fur- 
ther provided in the act, one commissioner on the 
part of each to have the care and management of 
the bridges and draws." 

I am not conversant with this thing, but I pre- 
sume the purpose of this order is to get at the 
action of the Legislature in relation to Chelsea 
Bridge. The position I occupy is well known to 
many Aldermen. I am favor of maintaining every 
bridge that lies within the boundary line of Bos- 
ton ; and if the Cambridge bridges are inside the 
Cambridge boundaries, they should be main- 
tained by that city, and that I conceive 
to be a matter of equity, unless there is some con- 
tract between the city of Boston and Cambridge, to 
which we have given our assent. For instance, it 
the city of Boston has not given its assent, and 
has been compelled to do this thing, then I say I 
am in favor of the spirit of the legislation of the 
recent and remote past by which every town main- 
tains its own bridges. Perhaps I may not be con- 
versant with all the details of this question, and I 
have been charged with not looking out for the 
city's interests by maintaining that Chelcea and 
Boston should maintain their own bridges; but I 
believe that to be established by the spirit of 
equity and legislation. In 1867 I happened to be 
in this Board of Aldermen as Chairman of the 
Committee on Bridges; Mr. Xorcross happened to 
be Mayor, and the same gentlemen happened to be 
one of the commissioners to regulate matters under 
supervision ot the Supreme Court with reference 
to the Charles River bridges. I was instructed by 
the voices that ruled theCiry Hall at that time, by 
his Honor the Mayor, the City Solicitor aud oth- 
ers, to go to the Legislature and be the instru- 
ment of conveying to them the fact that we 



72 



BOARD OF ALDEKMKN. 



would maintain the bridges that run lrom 
here to Cbarlestown, auil w^e within our 
own boundary lines. Now, in that same spirit 
I am in favor of this, unless there is some con 
tract by which we are bound, and unless we have 
a right to appeal to a higher court, as Chelsea 
seems to think she has, for there is no reason why 
every town and city shouldn't maintain their own 
bridges. 
The order was passed. Sent down. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS TO BE INSPECTED. 

Alderman Whidden offered an order— That the 
Inspector of Buildings be requested to furnish to 
this Hoard the names and locations of such public 
buildings, if any, the owners of which have not 



complied with the requisitions made upon them 
for protection from the danger from fire or panic; 
also what buildings, if any, belonging to the city 
of Boston would be considered by him unsafe in 
case of lire or other cause that might produce a 
panic In an audience. Read once. 

SALARIES OF OFFICERS A T TENDINC OX I II B 
COURTS. 

Alderman Harris offered an order — That his 
Honor the Mayor be and he is hereby requested 
to petition the Legislature for the passage of an 
act empowering the Board of Aldermen to fix 
the salaries for the services of all officers attend- 
ing the several courts within the county of Suf- 
folk. Read twice and passed. 

Adjourned on motion of Alderman Whidden. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



73 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY 91, 1878. 



Regular meeting at half-past seven o'clock 
P. M., Benjamin Pope, President, in the chair. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS FKOM THE BOARD OF 
ALDERMEN. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Annual report of the City Engineer. Placed on 
file. 

Report and order to cancel old bond and to is- 
sue new agreement to Charles Reinhardt for an 
estate on Middlesex street. Older read twice aud 
passed in concurrence. 

Order to petition for act to release this city from 
maintaining any part of West Boston or Cragie's 
bridge outside or city limits. Read twice and 
passed in concurrence. 

Report and order for the cession to the city of 
the strip of flats on Charles River line from south- 
erly line of Canal Bridge to Harbor Commission- 
ers' line near junction of Brookline avenue and 
Beacon street. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 said this subject had 
been introduced into the Legislature, and as there 
was no need of hurry he hoped it would lie over. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 said there was not the 
slightest objection to the order lying over if the 
matter had been introduced in the Legislature. 

On motion of Mr. McGaragle, the order was laid 
upon the table. 

Order for an act to empower the Board of Al- 
dermen to fix salaries of officers attending the 
several courts in Suffolk County. On motion of 
Mr. Speuceley of Ward 19, the order was referred 
to the Committee on Legislative Matters. Sent up. 

Order for Committee on Common, etc., to con- 
fer with the Governor and Council for conveyance 
of the parcel ol land described in chapter 195, 
acts of 1875. Passed in concurrence. 

VEGETABLE MARKET. 

An order came down for the joint special com- 
mittee to consider the expediency of purchasing 
the Mercantile- wharf property. 

The order was read twice, and the question was 
upon its passage. 

Mr. McDonald of Ward 12 moved an indefinite 
postponement of the order. 

Mr. Hibbard of Ward 17—1 think this wholly 
unfair. This matter has been before the 
City Government for several years, and 
it is only desired that it shall have a 
fair hearing. I will state for the information of 
the members of the Council that previous to the 
farmers' occupying India wharf, where they are 
now, they were in the streets, which were liter- 
ally blocked up. An ordinance prohibited them 
from occupying the streets until after four o'clock 
in the afternoon, and they svere fined if they 
did n't leave it before eight o'clock in the morn- 
ing. They are now located upon India wharf, and 
if the order for the passage of Mercantile wharf 
was before us tonight, I think I should vote against 
it; but I hope we shall pass this order, so.that we 
mav give the subject a thorough investigation and 
do justice to all parties concerned. If the farmers 
can stay on India wharf it may do, and perhaps it 
maybe best, to purchase the Mercantile-wharf 
property. The lease of the India-wharf prop- 
erty and the city's lease of the Mercantile- 
wharf property both expire in May. There is 
no knowing that the owners of Mercantile 
wharf will re-lease it to the city. Before 
the farmers went to India wharf, we had often 
received orders late in the afternoon for goods to 
go by the boats and it was impossible sometimes 
to till them — the streets were literally blocked up 
by the farmers. I don't suppose any members of 
this Council have any idea of the large numbers 
of farmers who come to the city with vegetables; 
they literally block up the streets. I do hope 
this matter will be rererred to the special com- 
mittee, who can investigate the whole subject, so 
that we shall be able to do what is best for all 
parties concerned. 

Mr. McDonald— I do not believe the city of Bos- 
ton is anxious to purchase any more property : 
they have sufficient on hand now without entail- 
ing any more expense. This Mercantile wharf 
will cost somewhere about §350,000. That order 



was before us last year and was laid on the table, 
and I don't believe the city of Boston wants to 
enter into any negotiations now in regard to that 
property. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 don't see that this 
order proposes to purchase this property. The 
Aldermen want a joint special committee to con- 
sider it, and as a matter of courtesy I think we 
should concur; there is nothing to say that we 
shall purchase this or any other wharf. 

The motion to indefinitely postpone was lost 
and tne order was passed in concurrence. The 
Chair appointed Messrs. Webster of Ward 3, Dan- 
forth of Ward 10, Coe of Ward 23, Whicher of 
Ward 20 and Sawyer of Ward 20 on said com- 
mittee. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PRINTING. 

The Mayor's message appointing, subject to 
approval, George Coolidge as Superintendent of 
Printing, came down for concurrence in the con- 
firmation of the appointment. 

Committee— Messrs. Toppan of Ward 3, Hollis 
of Ward 25 and Cannon of Ward 7. 

The question was taken by a yea and nay ballot 
and the nomination was confirmed in concur- 
rence—yea 53, nay 9. 

HARBOR MASTER. 

A report and order came down to accept an act 
concerning the Harbor Master of Boston. 

The question was upon giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 presented petitions 
relating to the subject, as follows: 

Petition of James Alexander, Thayer & Lincoln 
and others, owners and agents of steamship lines, 
and merchants interested in shipping, urging that 
the duties of Harbor Police and Harbor Master 
may be kept separate, as any change like the one 
proposed will work an injury to the mercantile 
interests of the city; and, as the duties of Harbor 
Master are performed with entire satisfaction to 
them by Captain Cates, they ask for his continu- 
ance in the office. 

Also petition of William H. Harrington and 
others, pilots, protesting against any change in 
the administration of the duties of Harbor Mas- 
ter or harbor police, by consolidation or other- 
wise, believing it will be injurious to the com- 
merce of Boston. The Harbor Master's duties 
keep him in the upper harbor, and the police 
boat's duties are in the lower harbor; and they 
testily to the efficiency of Captains Cates and 
Gould in their present positions. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 said he had not in- 
vestigated the matter, and the communications 
were placed in his hands to present. This is an 
important matter and should receive full consid- 
eration. If they had not done so, the committee 
should give the parties a hearing. He moved to 
lay on the table. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 said the order was 
merely to accept the act, and did not contemplate 
the removal of Captain Cates or anybody else. In 
reply to a question by Mr. Richardson, he said 
there had been no hearing as yet. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 again urged the im- 
portance of the interests at stake, and the neces- 
sity for full consideration in view of the state- 
ments made t>v the petitioners. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9 said there had been no 
public hearing. The only question is whether 
they will accept the act to enable us to transfer 
the duties of Harbor Master to the Captain of 
Police; and when that question comes up will be 
a proper time to give a public hearing, if one is 
called for. The main object of the order is to 
enable us to unite the two offices if we see fit to 
do so, and save considerable money. The 
authorities believe that the police boatcan per- 
form all the duties of Harbor Master, aud the two 
offices can be united, and it so seemed to the com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 said that as the act 
was passed several years ago there was no need 
of hurry, and in view of the representations of 
the petitioners, they should act carefully in this 
matter, which affects the commerce of Boston. 
The city should encourage commerce in every 
possible way. 

Mr. McGaragle was in favor of saving money, 
but as the salary of the Harbor Master would be 
paid for the year ending May 1, he hoped the 
matter would go over to allow investigation. 

Mr. Spenceley said he did not object to a post- 
ponement, and at his suggestion Mr. Richardson 
agreed to a special assignment, which was fixed 
for two weeks from tonight at nine o'clock, and 
the Council so voted. 



74 



COMMON COUNCIL 



FIRST ASSISTANT IS8BSBORS. 

A certiticate caiue down of the election of First 
Assistant Assessors as follows: 

William J. Ellis, .John H. Duane, George S. Pen- 
dergast, William 15. Long, Xaliuui Chapin. Wil- 
liam N. Starrett, Michael Carney, Artetuas R. 
Holden.John Brown, Horace Loring, Joseph L. 
Drew, William H. Candy, Phineas H. Smith, John 
H. Giblin, Joseph R. Grose, Thomas Leavitt, 
Charles B. Hunting, Theophilus Bun, William B. 
Smart, George F. Williams, John McElroy. L. 
Foster Morse, Charles E. Grant, Andrew J. 
Browne, John H. Griggs, George A. Comins, 
Charles E. Temple, Gideon Walker, John Pierce, 
Henry Pierce, Charles Nowell, Richard B. Smart, 
William A. Wheeler. 

An election whs ordered, and on motion of Mr. 
Sampson a committee of six to collect and count 
votes was appointed as follows : Messrs. Mowry 
of Ward 11, Kidney oi Ward C>, McGaragle of 
Ward 8, Wvni hi of Ward 2J, Rust of Ward 10, and 
Brawlev of Ward 19. 

On motion of Mr. Speuceley, a recess was taken, 
at the end of which the committee reported as 
follows: 

Whole number of votes 65 

Neeessarv for a choice 33 

William J . Kllis 53 

John H. Duane 53 

George S. Pendergast 60 

William B. Long 64 

Nahum Chapin 60 

William N. Starrett 64 

Michael Carney 56 

Artemas R. Hoiden 57 

John Brown 58 

Horace Loring 60 

Joseph L. Drew 44 

William H. Cundy 41 

l'hincas IS. Smith 52 

.1 olin H. Giblin 61 

Joseph R. Grose 63 

Thomas Leavitt 62 

Charles K. Hunting 58 

Theophilus Burr 60 

William B. Smart 60 

George F. Williams 45 

John McElroy 53 

Ei, Foster Morse 54 

Charles E. Grant 54 

Andrew J . Browne 63 

John H. Griggs 52 

George A. Comins 59 

( harles E. Temple 61 

Gideon Walker 57 

John Pierce 57 

Henry Pierce 58 

Charles Nowell 58 

Richard B. Smart 58 

William A. Wheeler 41 

Joseph Robbins 6 

John A. McLaughlin 20 

Edward Riley 24 

Thomas J. Anderson 25 

Emerson Coolidge 10 

DudlevPray 18 

Francis James 22 

John Leahy 3 

Dennis Moore 27 

William G. Train 21 

John Noble 34 

George W. Kingman 1 

Francis E. Hines 27 

John W. Brown 4 

Jarvis D. Braman 13 

John W. Steere 1 

William S. Anderson 1 

There were tour ballots containing thirty-four 
names which the committee did not count. 

The thirty-three elected by the Board of Alder- 
men were declared elected in concurrence. 

superintendent of public grounds. 

On motion of Mr. Mullane of Ward 12, the Coun- 
cil took up the special assignment for nine o'clock 
and proceeded to the election of Superintendent 
of Common and Public Grounds. Committee- 
Messrs. McGaragle of Ward 8, Roach of Ward 7, 
Sawyer of Ward 24. 

Whole number of votes 68 

Necessary for a choice 35 

John Galvin had 30 

William Doogue 31 

Hermann Gundel 5 

Park Commissioners I 

William B. Long 1 

And there was no choice. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24 moved that the whole 
subject be laid upon the table. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17—1 trust that motion 
will not be carried, and that we shall proceed to 
another ballot. 

The motion to lay on the table was lost, and on 
motion of Mr. Sampson of Ward 17, a second bal- 



lot was ordered. The ballot was taken and the 
committee reported as follows: 

Whole nun ber of votes 70 

Necessary for s choice »..36 

John Galvin had 28 

William Doogue 36 

Hermann Crundel 5 

Park Commissioners 1 

Before the result was declared Mr. Sampson of 
Ward 17 said— I question the correctness of that 
ballot, as three members are absent. Messrs. J. H. 
Pierce, Pearl and Coe are absent, and it is n't 
possible for that to be a correct ballot. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11 moved the report be re- 
committed to the committee. 

Mr. McGaragle— There is no reason ior recom- 
mitting it, as the ballots were in the box, and we 
counted them three times. 

On motion of Mr. Sampson of Ward 17, the bal- 
lot was thrown out, and a new one taken. The 
committee reported (Mr. McGaragle remarking 
that the absent members must have returned) — 

Whole number of votes ,.70 

Necessary for a choice 36 

William Doogue 36 

John Galvin 29 

Hermann Grundel 1 

Park Commissioners 1 

Before the result was declared Mr. Sampson of 
Ward 17 moved that the ballot be recommitted, 
as the vote for Park Commissioners being for 
three men, and ineligible, should not be counted. 

Mr. McGaragle— The ballots were in the box 
each time. 

Mr. Burke of W r ard 2— It is evident that the 
gentleman from Ward 17 is right. There are three 
members absent, and, that there may be fair play, 
I move that the matter be specially assigned to 
next Thursday evening at 9 o'clock. 

Mr. Mullane of Ward 12—1 hope that it will not 
be postponed, but that we shall proceed to a bal- 
lot tonight. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 moved that the com- 
mittee stand in the centre of the hall, and that 
each member deposit his ballot as bis name is 
called, which motion prevailed, and the ballot 
proceeded in accordance therewith, all the mem- 
bers being present and voting except Messrs. Coe, 
Pierce and Pearl. 

Whole number of votes 69 

Necessary for a choice 35 

William Doogue 38 

John Galvin 28 

Herman Grunndell 3 

And Mr. Doogue was declared elected. Sent up. 

ACCOUNTS OF WATER BOARD. 

The order to authorize the Water Board to spend 
.$500 for an expert accountant to arrange and 
commence a new system of bookkeeping for that 
department was considered under unfinished 
business. 

Mr. Lauten of Ward 14 moved to substitute $250 
for $500, as he was assured by experts that that 
amount would be sufficient. As economy ought 
to be practised, he hoped his amendment would 
prevail. 

Mr. Wilson of Ward 20 explained the needs o 
the new system. 

Mr. Lauten was satisfied that $250 will accom- 
plish the same result. 

.Mr. Rosnosky of Ward 10 said the estimate was 
carefully made by the Water Board, and if the 
whole amount is not needed it will not be spent. 

The amendment was rejected. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24 desired more informa- 
tion, and Mr. Wilson read the recommendations 
of the Water Board on the subject. 

Mr. Barnard thought it a large sum to pay one 
clerk from now to May 1, and he must be very ex- 
pert to deserve it. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3 knew nothing of the de- 
tails, but thought that as the Water Board are 
trusted with so large an appropriation during the 
year, they could be depended on to spend this 
amount to the best advantage, and the Council 
should leave it to their judgment. 

Mr. Brawley explained the condition of affairs 
in thb office ; the present clerk has not time to ar- 
range a new system, being occupied in keeping 
the minutes of the board in relation to the settle- 
ment of land damages. 

Mr. Lauten did not object to the new system, 
but to paying $500 for what could be procured for 
$250. 

The motion to table was lost, and the order was 
passed in concurrence. 



FEBRUARY 21. 1878 



75 



BACK BAY PARK. 

The order to authorize the Park Commissioners 
to purchase additional land to complete the ap- 
proaches to the Back Bay Park was considered 
under unfinished business, and was passed. The 
order for a transfer of £16,000 for said purchase 
was passed— yeas 04, nays 1 ; Mr. Barnard of Ward 
24 voting nay. Sent up* 

POLICE COMMISSION. 

The order for the Mayor to petition the Legisla- 
ture for an act to establish a Police Commission 
was considered under unfinished business, the 
question being on giving the order a second 
reading. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19—1 move that the or- 
der be indefinitely postponed, and I call for the 
yeas and nays to verify the result. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3— At the last meeting of 
the Council the gentleman from Ward 2 made a 
very able and eloquent defence ot the rights of the 
people, but was under a very serious misappre- 
hension, and I have no doubt that many who 
listened to him presumed that he was correct in 
his statements, and therefore voted misunder- 
standingly. I find in his remarks the following 
words: "But when you establish a commission, it 
takes a two-thirds vote of both branches for two 
years before you can abolish it." Xow, Mr. Presi- 
dent, this is a very good reason why we should 
not have a commission if such is the effect, but it 
is entirely imaginary and a delusion, and there is 
no authority for it. If this act is passed, the commis- 
sion will besirnilarto that which has charge of the 
Fire Department, which is now under the control 
of the City Government by an ordinance, and if 
that ordinance should be repealed, and his Honor 
the Mayor should approve it, the commission 
would he abolished immediately. The idea that 
it takes a two-thirds vote of each branch for two 
consecutive years to abolish a commission is a 
complete delusion, and I will be very happy if 
the gentleman from Ward 2 will show me the least 
foundation for the assertion. There is a very se- 
rious prejudice against giving up any of the power 
of the Common Council in this matter. It is said 
that we are the popular branch direct from the 
people, and we want to hold on to our power. I 
would like to ask what power we have in regard 
to the Police Department or any other depart- 
ment. We can pass the annual appropriation for 
the police or auy other department, and cut down 
or raise the salaries of the men, and we can do the 
same with regard to the Fire Department ; but in re- 
gard to any aetails of the management, the buying 
of supplies, etc., a member of "the Council has no 
more to do with it than a person outside has. If 
this act is drawn, it is the intention ot those who 
favor it to have the commission confirmed by 
both branches of the City Government, the same 
as the members of the Fire Commission are. In 
my opinion all these commissioners should be ap- 
pointed in that way, and if the act is not so drawn 
I would not vote for it, and presume that others 
would not. So it is fair to presume that if 
the act takes effect at all it will require 
a confirmation by both branches. Then 
we shall have some power in regard to the depart- 
ment. The names uominated by the Mayor will 
come to us for confirmation, and we shall have 
the same power in regard to them that we have in 
regard to the Board of Health and other depart- 
ments If that is not a practical gain to the Coun- 
cil I should like to know what is. We should have 
equal power with the Board of Aldermen, and if 
we want to make an inquiry into the management 
we should have a cordial reception and influence 
that properly belong to us." We now have a 
vote upon the annual appropriation for the 
Police Department, and then we are thrown on 
that committee for the remainder of the year. If 
any member can show me how the Council does 
n't gain a great deal of influence by this change, I 
should like to know how it is. The Mayor and Al- 
dermen, who have the entire handling of this mat- 
ter, feel satisfied to delegate their power to the 
commission, and the Common Council, who have 
now no power at all, should not object. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2—1 feel very thankful to the 
gentleman from Ward 3 for the compliment he 
pays me. 

If I said that the appointment of the Police 
Commission was in the manner described and 
it is not true, I am wroDg ; but if I am not greatly 
mistaken that is the way the boards of commis- 
sions are established today. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3— Can you name one? 



Mr. Burke — I think the Fire Commission is, and 
if I am wrong I am willing to admit it. I did not 
come here to make any special point upon this 
subject tonight, and anything I have said in 
regard to taking away the rights of the 
people is just what I propose to repeat at 
this time, and I don't think any argument the 
gentleman can produce will convert me from the 
doctrine 1 believe in. So tar as I have had any 
chance to know, it has been the object of all 
governments— not only this government, but 
from time immemorial it has been the object of 
all governments— to take away the power from 
the people. That is what ambitious men have 
sought for from the beginning of the world, and 
it is the case in this country: and although one 
hundred years ago we were a free people, many 
efforts have been made to centralize it into 
a monarchy and a kingdom. The gentleman says 
that this Council would be better off to put the 
police into the hands of the commission. If I 
could be convinced that that is the case I should 
be glad to vote for it, but I cannot see the neces- 
sity for it. Speaking of the necessity for it, it is 
proposed that the Government this year shall be 
economical, but while they are willing to cut 
down in one department they are willing to 
add to another. This measure pi oposes to add 
about S12.000 a year to the cost of running this 
department. The gentlemen who favor this meas- 
ure want to make me believe that the present 
system — the Chief of Folice withjall his deputies 
and assistants— cannot manage the department. 
If that is the case, all 1 say that you want is a few 
live men in the department. There are fifteen 
station houses in the city, and I oelieve each one 
has a captain, two lieutenants and three sergeants 
attached to it, and that the whole police force is 
about 715 men, who are managed by about fifty 
officers. The force is divided up among the sev- 
eral sections of the city, each of which is in 
charge of a captain, and the Chief of Police is 
over them all, and he has a great deal of power in 
the City Hall with the Committee on the Depart- 
ment ard his Honor the Mayor to back him up: 
and then you come here and tell us that the de- 
partment is unmanageable, and that vou must ap- 
point a commission and pay them 812,000 a year 
to take care of it. Xow, who are to be ap- 
pointed the commissioners? Will it be some- 
body who has been brought up in the 
school and learned the necessary tactics of our 
police discipline? Or must it be somebody who 
will tell the policemen how many buttons they 
must have in front, and what kind of caps they 
want? Perhaps it may be that some broken- 
down merchants are looking for positions of 
this kind! Who are the men who fill the 
commissions ? Are they the men who are 
brought up in the business? The question 
is before a certain committee whether there 
shall be practical men in a certain branch 
of business or not, and will the Chief of Police or 
good patrolmen who desire promotion be ap- 
pointed on the commission? Xo, sir; I venture 
to say that such men would not be allowed to 
stand the chances of confirmation. Xow, sir, the 
gentleman says that the public finger has been 
put into this thing. I find that the newspapers 
say we must have a Police Commission. The 
newspapers say that we come here and make 
threadbare speeches and pretentious patriotism, 
but that they don't amount to anything; and, 
finally, that if the city don't take up this matter, 
the State will. Let that be the case; let the State 
do what it will ; I will not vote for the commis- 
sion. I have seen enough of commissions. We 
had a commission which was made up of some of 
the most respectable men of Boston — look at the 
Danvers Hospital, which was managed by 
a commission ! AVhat economy was that 
to the State of Massachusetts, costing three 
times as much as at first assumed? I ven- 
ture to say that a first-class architect or mechanic 
would have taken charge of that matter alone 
and built it for at least one-third what it 
cost the State. I don't propose to be a bob to 
anybody's kite, or the Boston Herald either. 

Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11— I do not share the ap- 
prehensions of the gentleman from Ward 2 that 
the establishment of a police commission will 
subject us to the establishment of a monarchy. 
A great deal has been said about the rights of trie 
people. I believe the first and greatest right of 
the people is that the State and city shall be gov- 
erne"d economically and ably ; ana "it is our first 
duty to pay attention solely to that end. Since 
the establishment of the Fire Commission I do 



7(> 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



not think we have heard any complaints from 
citizens at large that they have been robbed of 
their rights. On the contrary, I believe the testi- 
mony ot the citizens at large is that the Fire De- 
partment is managed more ably and with more 
discipline in the organization than heretofore. 
The Chief of Police stated to the committee that, 
in bis opinion, the discipline coined under the 
management of a commission would enable the 
department to do away with sufficient pa- 
trolmen to pay the salaries of the com- 
missioners. It should be remembered that this 
measure is a proposed consolidation, not entirely 
a new commission. It is proposed to place the 
Police Department in the hands of a commission 
which already exists, and has, I believe, done 
its work well. The matter has been recommend- 
ed both by his Honor the late Mayor, and the 
present Mayor, and so far as can lie judged by 
conversation in the street and the tone of the news- 
papers, I think that the right which the people 
want and demand at our hands is that the Police 
Department shall be managed with as much 
economy and efficiency as any other department 
in the City Government. It'is the equal in im- 
portance of any other department in the City 
Government, and perhaps in a time of emergency 
it might be of mbre importance than any other. 
I think this is a step in the right direction, and 
I hope the motion to indefinitely postpone will not 
be carried. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 'J— The gentleman from 
Ward 2 bases his opposition to this measure upon 
the ground that it is taking the government of 
the police away from the people. He must mean by 
that that when the people assemble to cast their 
ballots on voting days, they can no longer influ- 
ence the persons who govern the Police Depart- 
ment. Now, he means to say by that that the 
Common Council will have no influence with the 
department. We know that we cannot now influ- 
ence the Police Department in the slightest 
degree. If he refers to the Board of Alder- 
men, they stand no nearer the people 
than the Common Council. The Hoard 
is composed of twelve men, and you cannot nut 
your finger upon a single one of them. The pro- 
posed measure fixes the responsibility upon the 
Mayor, whose appointments are to be confirmed 
by the City Council. If we put that responsibility 
upon one man, the people will know 
whom to censure for wrong-doing; they can 
express their opinion upon it and defeat him; 
while if you divide the responsibility among 
twelve, or seventy-two men, you confuse the peo- 
ple and prevent the fixing of responsibility upon 
any one. Therefore, if the gentleman from Ward 
_' is anxious to bring this matter into the power 
of the people, he will vote for the change. 

Mr. BIcGarsele of 'W ard 8—1 am sorry the gen- 
tleman from Ward 9 was so brief; it he had kept 
on in this strain he would have made a strong 
argument against the commission. He says that 
it you place the responsibility in the hands ot 
the Mayor the people can defeat him ; ana that it 
should not be placed in the hands of seventy-;, wo 
men because the responsibility will be scat- 
tered all over the city of Boston. If he had 
kept on in that strain, 1 am almost sure 
the order would be indefinitely postponed. I 
came here tonight hardly prepared to vote either 
way. We were told at ihe last meeting that all 
they wanted was authority to establish a commis- 
sion; that there was no act drawn, and when the 
act passed we would then decide whether or not 
we wanted the commission. But it appears tliat 
the gentleman from Ward 'i has let the cat out of 
the bag ; he has seen the act and revised it. The 
leman from Ward 11 says it don't propose to 
increase the expenditure, but to put it into the 
hands of a commission who have done their duty 
faithfully. Now, it occurs to me, he is forestall- 
ing the action of the Legislature, when it appears 
that they may have a prohibitory law. I am will- 
ing to admit that the License Commission is the 
best ever established in the City Hall, and the 
members have worked for less money. But suppose 
we have a prohibitory law, are you going to have 
a commission to license prohibition ? We would 
n't need any commission. He also reierred to the 
testimony of the Chief of Police and the Deputy 
in favor of a commission. If that testimony is so 
important, why don't they produce it for the mem- 
bers of the Council to read and judge for them- 
selves? The gentleman lays great stress upon it, 
and that is all we know about it. We don't know 
whether they were in favor of or against it. If the 
testimony is so important, why don't the commit- 



tee produce it? I should like to read it: it might 
change my mind. I can see no good in passing 
this order tonight. The subject has been intro- 
duced in the Legislature by a young senator from 
the South End, and if they'see'fit, they can pass a 
law for it, notwithstanding the c>ty of Boston 
don't authorize the Mayor to petition for it. The 
Legislature can make it obligatory upon the city 
of Boston, and as the matter has been Introduced, 
I can see no good but in indefinitely postponing 
the order. 

Mr. Webster ot Ward 3— The gentleman has ac 
cused me of the very heinous crime of telling him 
some news; but I think he has told us some. He 
says he came here not knowing he should vote 
upon this question. That is news to all of us. I 
think his mind is pretty well made up and 1 don't 
think it will be changed if we talk till the 
day of judgment. It is too late in the day 
and in the night to argue the question 
of commissions. We all know there are 
commissions on health, Fire Department, sinking 
funds and licenses, and if any gentleniau has real- 
ly investigated the condition of affairs in those 
departments before and since the commissions 
were established, he cannot but see the benefit 
they have done. If these facts are not apparent 
to the gentleman, certainly no amount of argu- 
ment can change his mind. 

Mr. McGaragle— I am exceedingly obliged to 
the gentleman, and am willing to acknowledge 
his shrewdness in gulling the public. As a mind 
reader he excels anyhody at this board. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I do not propose to 
enter upon the interminable controversy of the 
respective merits ot different theories of govern- 
ment, from which discussion about all that has 
been gained, and in which about all that can, I 
think, be said is summed up by the poet when he 
said— 

"For forms of government let fools contest, 
That which is best administered is best." 
And this, if 1 understand it, is a question merely 
of administration or execution, not of legislation, 
not of law, not involving pny discussion of 
any principle of political or civil policy; it is 
simply a question of means; not of what laws 
or ordinances we shall live under, nor by whom, 
when or how made; but simply when made, how, 
by what agency or machinery they can be best en- 
forced, most impartially euforced, most indepen- 
dently and effectually enforced, for the preserva- 
tion of order, and the security of the rights of 
the whole people; gentlemen err, by a want of 
clear definitions, I think, when they speak Of this 
measure as one calculated to deprive the people 
of their rights; on the contrary, it is an effort cal- 
culated to secure and preserve the rights of the 
people, not of a class, but the masSi 
by placing the administration of the law 
upon a permanent basis of l tiles and regulations 
independent of individual dictation or interfer- 
ence; and in line, by making it, in this respect 
also, as we boast that it is in others, a govern- 
ment of law, and not ot men. Let us look the 
situation squarely in the lace, and speak plainly. 
Does the Police Department ot the city fully do 
what is or should be required of it? does It per- 
form its whole duty for the public welfare ? are 
you, are we and our constituents, satisfied with 
the measure of its present performance) and with 
its present condition? 1 understand that these 
questions have but one answer in general public 
opinion, and that is the negative. 

Our present Mayor speaks of it mildly as "unsat- 
islactory," ex-Mayor Prince over a year ago said, 
"One of the heads of the London police assured 
me that the worst parts of that great metropolis 
could be traversed with perfect safety by day or 
by night, but the almost daily record of assaults 
upon our own citizens, by the roughs prevent us 
from boasting ot the same immunity from dan- 
ger." I do not know that Boston is more wicked 
than other cities of equal population in this coun- 
try. She ought to be tar less so, and I should say 
that she has poor encouragement for the great 
outlays which she makes to educate and elevate 
all classes, if she is not far less so; but the stories, 
and evidence of their truth, of certain crimes 
which go unpunished, of wickedness winked at 
in some ulaces, and of trivial delinquencies mag- 
nified into enormities in others, of the payments 
of money for dispensations and privileges, of fa- 
voritism, are too rife and common, and 
the public believe them. And the public 
have lost confidence in it, and this of 
itselt prevents its usefulness and prevents its 
own reform. Now, what will you do? What will 



FEB RU AKY 21 



1878 



77 



gentlemen of Ward 5 or "Ward 19 do? They may 
liave hoped, as some others have, that a fearless 
and vigorous effort to effect some reforms and 
changes, to extinguish some abuses, might have 
been made before'resorting to the measure before 
us; but the ottier branch of the City Council, 
who have the entire control of its disci- 
pline, have declared by a vote two to one 
their inability to make these needed reforms and 
changes under the present system, and have pro- 
nounced their judgment against this system. 
They say we are helpless under it. 'So I say, What 
will you do? Will you let this condition go on 
Jrom bad to worse, until you will, possibly, by 
State interference, lose your hold on the conduct 
of the department wholly? Like some theologians 
of whom we have read, will gentlemen 
refuse salvation because they cannot have 
it on the line of their own theories? 
The safety of the people is the highest duty, the 
tiist law. The measure and plan proposed has 
some features which I think all will admit are im- 
provements. I can mention now, for want of 
time, only one, that is the plan of the selection of 
officers and men with special reference to their 
qualifications. You know that men have been 
put upon the police force and retained there from 
youth to old age who have no aptness 
or fitness by nature, learning or skill for 
it, to whom these positions were given by 
friends as a means merely of support; a thing 
which would not be done in any other profession, 
trade, business or occupation in which men are 
engaged. And the weakness of the department 
today is largely the result of it; and I doubt if it 
is possible under tne present system to remedy 
this, because there is no Mayor, nor any commit- 
tee, nor any Board of Aldermen who have the 
qualifications necessary to determine the qualifi- 
cations of others, and I do not thinjs it would be 
wise or expedient to give the entire appointing 
power to tne chief. 

Abuses exist, which only radical measures will 
extinguish. Such measures as that no Mayor 
no Board of Aldeimeu and no committee have the 
power or the courage to adopt and carry ont; at 
least they do not. 

Inconvenience is apprehended by some from a 
commission of three persons; but we have here no 
experience in other departments to justiiy this 
fear. Under the present system we have the 
Chief of Police, the Mayor and the Board of Al- 
dermen, and the committee; — which of these now 
is the responsible bead? I doubt if you could de- 
vise a system in which it would be more difficult 
to find a responsible head in an emergency than 
the present one. I believe gentlemen suffer 
themselves to be confused by words when 
they say that they would be g'iving up their 
rights by voting for this measure. What are 
your rights, if not providing for the public wel- 
fare? for securiug the greatest good co the great- 
est number? Can you suggest any way by which 
that is better secured than by administering law 
by and upon a settled, continuous and permanent 
policy? By making the ministers of the law 
amenable only to law and not the caprices of men ? 
And this I believe will be secured by the proposed 
change. 

Mr.Spenceley of Ward 19— The gentleman has 
made some pretty broad statements, and I would 
like to ask him a question or two. He said the 
committee of the Aldermen have said by their 
votes that they are not competent to take care of 
this department. Where does he find it? He 
says men physically, morally and mentally un- 
fitted tor this business are appointed, and I 
would like to ask him who appoints them ? Then 
he says the committee are not sufficiently learned 
in police matters to take charge of this; and I 
would like to ask where he is going to find three 
commissioners who are? 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10—1 find the first 
statement in the fact that while the law gives 
the discipline and regulation of the Police Depart- 
ment to the Mayor aud Aldermen, they have in 
effect declined to put in effect the reforms and 
changes that they declare should be made. They 
say the system is wrong and that abuses exist — if 
I correctly read the reports of their proceed- 
ings—which cannot be reached under the 
present system; and if that is not in ef- 
fect saving they are unable to reach the reforms 
needed, I do not know what they mean by their 
language. Then further, in answer to the gentle- 
man, I do not think he quoted me correctly when 
he said I said that men are on the police who are 
physically ana morally unfit for the duty. I say 



that men have been appointed upon the police 
and remained there from youth to old age, who 
hare no special qualifications for the duty. It is 
a position which, in my judgment, requires spe- 
cial qualifications as mnch as any other execu- 
tive office. There is no occupation in the world 
for which some men do not have natural aptitude 
and greater skill than others, and I have no ques- 
tion but that men have been raised who have a 
peculiar fitness for it. A man now sends his pe- 
tition to the Mayor to be appointed; political and 
social friends recommend him and he is appointed. 
Has there been any examination, any test, as to his 
peculiar fitness? That is what I meant by that; and 
mean to say that there should be no appointment 
to any place under the Government without some 
test or standard of qualifications, just as men and 
corporations in private business have when they 
hire bookkeepers, clerks, or salesmen, or when 
they select parties to perform any work. Archi- 
tects, engineers and others are selected for their 
peculiar qualifications for the business, and no- 
body can doubt but that some men have a pecu- 
liar aptitude by nature or education for those du- 
ties, and they ought to perform them. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11— I agree with the gentle- 
man from Ward 10, when he says that there are 
many abuses in connection with police matters 
which have not been reached, and which cannot 
be remedied, and it is for this very reason that it 
seems to me to be necessary aud desirable that a 
commission should be established. It is well 
known that the duties of the Mayor ana Alder- 
men and the Chief of Police in connection with 
the department are not very clearly defined. 
There have often been conflicts of authority in 
this department, and it seems to me, for that very 
jeason, that it is extremely desirable to establish 
a commission. We need to have the department 
managed by a fixed and settled policy, which we 
cannot have so long as it is managed by a Mayor 
and a committee who are elected annually. !Now, 
sir, it seems to me there are only two objections 
against the commission; one is the centralization 
of power, and the other is the expense. 
As to the expense in this case, there have been no 
figures presented to show that there shall be a 
large increase ; and, in regard to the centraliza- 
tion of power, it seems to me that there can be no 
objection on that ground, because at p resent the 
power is in the hands of the Mayor, and under 
the commission it will be in the hands of three 
men. I don't think there is any objection to the 
establishment of the commission upon those 
grounds. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19— The gentleman from 
Ward 11 has stated this question just as we have 
heard it several times during the past two or 
three years. I heard of a man who had a key to a 
fire alarm box, who gave an alarm, and when the 
engines got there, and they found there was no 
fire, just a little smoke ; the commissioners took 
the key away from him. It seems to me there has 
been a great deal of smoke about this matter, and 
by and by it will clear up, and the key to the 
trouble will be taken away. The gentleman states 
that there is no discipline in the department, and 
I supposed that when he said they were entirely 
unfit for the duty that he meant they were physi- 
cally, morally aud spiritually disqualified. He 
goes on, but lie don't tell why, but all he says is 
that they are wolves ; but when we come down to 
the point he cannot place a fingerupon them. He 
says that the whole appointment rests with the 
Mayor. Well, I pity the Mayor, and it is a pretty 
hard duty; but why don't the gentleman move 
that, instead of the Mayor, we should 
have a commission at the head of the 
Government? Let us have a commission 
at headquarters, and not establish it down below 
for every little matter that comes up. So far as 
my observation is concerned, I have not seen 
the men who are disqualified for the position. 
I don't know how many men have been exam- 
ined physically, or how many have been cate- 
chized as to their spiritual condition. It is said 
that a commission will be needed in case of 
a riot, but has there been any riot? I saw 
that one of the papers said it would be a 
good thing to have a riot, so as to get a 
commission, and I don't know but they would 
incite one for that purpose. I venture to say that 
the argument was brought up in order to* get a 
commission to take care of the police. I have 
heard the argument used by gentlemen outside 
that the men were unfit for the position. Suppose 
we have a few old men in the service; they have 
given their lives to the city. Perhaps the com- 



78 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



mission might give tiiem some position so that 
they could have an easy time, but that has never 
been done in any case yet under a commission. 
The gentleman says the duties of the Mayor and 
Aldermen and Chief of Police are not well defined. 
Why don't they go to work and define that policy? 
Why don't they make an ordinance or petition the 
General Court for an act to define what the duties 
of the Chief of Police and the Mayor are ? Xo, the 
simple fact is commission— commission— commis- 
sion; that is about all we hear. It is the oalm for 
every wound. 

Mr. Howry— Balm of Gilead. 

Mr. Spenceley — The gentleman says balm of Gil- 
ead. I don't know much about Gilead. The gen- 
tleman from Ward !> insinuated at the last meet- 
ing that men voted for political effect in various 
matters, and I see that tbe reporter omitted it in 
the report. Now, 1 want t<> throw back 
the insinuation with just as much vehe- 
mence as he uttered it. 1 may be wrong- 
in my opposition to the commission, but 
my view is just as honest, and I have just as much 
right to my opinion as lie his. 1 do not know but 
he is advocating it for political effect. I do not 
look to the taking away ot the rights of the peo- 
ple so much as 1 do to the fine which nia.v be 
formed about the commissions supposing that a 
Mayor wanted to get the votes of these 
various commissions, and supposing we 
should go on and get a commission for the other 
departments, for we are coining to that, gentle- 
men. I say that a dozen men cannot be employed 
to manage such a large body of men as Koston 
has to employ without some political effect, and 
this is a power which can be used to drive men to 
vote for their purpose. If they tell us we 
are doing it for political effect, I think 
they had better look to the other side. 
Now look at the amount of money and the num- 
ber of men we have to employ year after year. 
Yon get that power all into the' hands of one "man, 
and I don't care who he is, 1 would rather trust 
the people of Boston by their ballots to elect that 
man, than to trust all that power in the hands of 
one man. Gentlemen may have confidence in the 
present Mayor, and 1 have too. But be may not 
always be there. The gentleman says if we have 
a commission, it is good and stable and strong. 
But I say, let the Mayor stay in the chair for two 
years and appoint the commissioners, and will he 
not have control of them? 

Mr. Richardson— Would the commission be in the 
control of the Mayor when they are elected by a 
joint ballot of both branches of "the City Coune'il? 
Would not the people have more control over the 
department than they now have? 

Mr. Spenceley— I know that both branches have 
to confirm these men. I have had some expere- 
ence in the past two or three years with men 
whom the City Council have confirmed. I am not 
here to say anything against the commissioners 
who have been" appointed to fill vacancies; but I 
do not believe in placing any man — I don't eare 
who he may be, whether a mechanic, plumber, or 
anybody else— in a position which he knows noth- 
ing about. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I think the gentle- 
man fails to comprehend my language. My ques- 
tion was whether the people sent to the popular 
branch will not have more control of the police 
appointments than they do now? 

Mr. Spenceley— No, sir; I think not. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— Then I will qualify 
it by saying, will they not by law? I don't know 
what influence the popular branch exercises upon 
the department, but will they not bylaw? I 
should like the gentleman to show why not. 

Mr. Spenceley— Wait until I get through and 
you can talk as much as you are a mind to. There 
is another point, and that is the idea so ably 
stated in the other branch— that the commission 
will be permanent, and that the old patiolmen 
will be retired on a pension. It is all marked out 
nicely. But I should like to know how a commis- 
sion can pension these men ? How are they 
going to get the money? We tried to do it 
last year and failed. This is the old bait, 
and I hope we shall not swallow the 
hook. The gentleman said, don't let 's debate 
this question, but have the order put in and send 
it to the State House. It is like putting a rope 
around our necks, and I don't propose to do it. 
I would like the gentleman to show in what there 
is really fault to be found with the Police Depart- 
ment as it is today. I think some things might 
be altered for the better, and that the 
duties of the Chief, Mayor aud Alder- 



men might be more clearly defined. The 
Committee on Ordinances might frame an ordi- 
nance which would arrange it more satisfactori- 
ly ; but I dou't see any reason for altering my 
opinion in relation to tins matter, although I un- 
derstand that gentlemen have It it is best to 
have a commission, let us have one; but as for 
myself I shall not vote for it. 

Mr. Shepard of Ward 1— I agree with the gen- 
tleman who has just taken his seat that a com- 
mission is not a balm lor every wound, nor a 
panacea for all out municipal evils. I have no 
doubt that there may be found a method of 
executive administration better than a commis- 
sion; but none has been advanced by gentlemen 
who advocate the postponement of this order, 
and the simple question for us is, whether 
the administration ot the police by a com- 
mission is better or worse than the present 
system of management by a committee of the 
Board of Aldermen. It is "merely a question of 
administration by three men called commission- 
ers in one case, and a committee of the Board of 
Aldermen in the other. Some reference was 
made a week ago to the experience of the city 
with regard to other commissions, and one gen- 
tleman referred to the cities of New York and 
Brooklyn, which are now anxious to get rid of 
commissions. I think that the gentlemen will 
find that the trouble has been, not that 
they had commissions, but that the power 
to appoint them was taken out of the bauds of the 
people of those cities, and the appointments were 
made by the State. The affairs of those cities 
were not administered by their own citizens, but 
by citizens of the country, who knew nothing of 
the requirements of those cities, and who come 
together year atter year and pass laws upon mat- 
ters the 'details of which they know nothing 
about. These are the evils complained of in Brook- 
lyn and other cities. The reason why we should 
establish this commission is that we shall have the 
control of it in our own hands. It has been stated 
that an effort will be made to place the police in 
charge of the governor, and it seems to me the 
best way to stop the complaint which has been 
made is to petition for authority to establish a 
commission under our own control, as we will 
show that the City Government is disposed to do 
all it can to have a vigorous and efficient po- 
lice. If we take this action we place 
the strongest obstacle in the way of those 
who desire to have the police "of Boston 
placed in charge of the governor. This talk about 
the rights of the people being invaded is all a 
great bugbear. The vast majority of the peo- 
lile of this city are not interested in getting 
men upon the police force or in any other 
department, or in getting their friends appointed 
to office. All they want is the best ad- 
ministration of the affairs of the city; all that 
they want is the greatest liberty in the pursuit of 
their private affairs with safety to their property; 
they are indifferent as to means. If they are sat- 
isfied that to administer the police by a 
commission is better than by a committee 
of the Board of Aldermen, you will not 
hear any complaint from them. The whole 
growth of cities and towns is tending 
toward the centralization of power. When 
we were a small town, the people could be brought 
together and vote upon every measure; they es- 
tablished their ordinances and voted upon every 
expenditure. But as the city grew, the people 
elected their representatives, who passed upon 
public measures. With the increase in wealth, 
population aud general prosperity, it was found 
that business could not be so well transacted by 
representatives in the popular branch as by com- 
missions. I believe the time will come when 
we will see something better than com- 
missions; but in this case it seems to me it is bet- 
ter to have three men to look after this depart- 
ment than it is to have it in charge of a com- 
mittee of the Board of Aldermen, who are liable 
to be changed every year. The matter of ex- 
pense has been adverted to, and it has been well 
met. But another side has not been presented. 
The most economical way is not always the 
most efficient; and should a commission prove 
more expensive than a committee, it the depart- 
ment were carried on more efficiently, and it peo- 
ple felt safer in their lives and property, it would 
really be a more economical way, even if the ap- 
parent expense might be greater. The gentleman 
from Ward 2 remarked that members of this 
Government could not have much influence with 
the commissioners; and he referred to the Fire 



FEBRUARY 91, 187 8 



79 



Commissioners. Now I have the honor to 
serve upon the Committee on Streets. I have 
had occasion to consult with the Ltreet Com- 
missioners and have found them anxious to con- 
fer with the Committee on Streets, and obtain 
their opinions. I am young in this business, and 
I may be mistaken, but I think I have all the in- 
fluence in those matters that I should have. When 
the Street Commissioners want anything done in 
the widening of streets the committee hear 
their reasons, form their own conclusions and pre- 
sent them to the Council. They are in- 
terested in having the work done in the best pos- 
sible manner, and it cannot be for their interest 
to have men appointed who are not responsible. 
It seems to me that the arguments in favor of this 
commission are very strong. One reform will be 
in the appointment of men upon the police. As it 
is now, a person comes in with a petition 
for an appointment; the Mayor has not the 
time to give to it that it deserves; he 
hears half a dozen friends ot the petitioner, 
who is appointed, and the name is referred to the 
Committee on Police. They have other public 
and private business to attend to; and supposing 
they have no private business, they serve upon 
many other committees and cannot understand 
and inquire into the qualifications of all the can- 
didates. On that account it seems to me it will 
be a good thing to have a commission. Now, 
about the removal of policemen. We have 
a great deal of fault found with the removals, 
and some are, no doubt, well grounded. But 
the fault is in the system. Not that the com- 
mittee do not intend to treat them fairly, but 
they have not time to hear all the cases. Under 
a commission, I suppose, all the hearings will be 
public, and any one would have an opportunity 
to be beard, and in that case I believe justice 
would be done to the police. Another matter 
is discipline. We have a good committee this 
year; yet I believe the chairman of the 
committee in his remarks in the Board of 
Aldermen confessed that there was great lack 
of discipline in the department ; that men were 
appointed and assigned to the stations where 
they belonged, and an order was brought from 
the Mayor to transfer them. He was asked if this 
was due to a want of backbone in the Chief, and 
he said tnat if the Chief were backed by the 
Mayor, he had backbone enough; but while sub- 
ject to political influences he could not do what 
he thought best. That must be apparent to any- 
body. The Alderman, although opposed to a 
commission, made that statement. Then another 
matter is the chance for rewarding persons who 
have been long in the service of the city. It 
seems to me a regular system should be provided 
for that. It is done in other corporations, and 
might be done in this department. " When a man 
has served long and faithfully, he should feel as- 
sured that, if cut down suddenly, his family would 
have something. It might be done under a com- 
mission who are permanent; but it could not, un- 
der a committee who come in one year and go out 
the next, when the discipline is constantly chang- 
ing from severe to lax. It seems to me this would 
be one of the best things for the discipline of the 
force. 

Mr. McDonald of Ward 12 moved the previous 
question. 

The President said that would cut off the mo- 
tion to indefinitely postpone. 

Mr. McDonald withdrew the motion, and Mr. 
Thompson renewed it. 

Mr. Brawley of Ward 19—1 hope the main ques- 
tion will not be ordered until we have a little 
more information upon this subject. It may per- 
haps cause a laugh to say that we want a little 
more information. We have had considerable 
argument, but we have had no information. All 
that we can conclude from the arguments we 
have heard is that abuses exist in phe Police De- 
partment, and it is necessary to create a commis- 
sion in order to eradicate those abuses. But no 
gentleman has shown this Council what the 
nature of the abuses is. The question 
has been argued from various standpoints, 
and from a political standpoint I think it would 
be very hard to find three men managing such a 
department who would not be swayed by political 
influence. The remarks of the gentleman from 
Ward 10 were well placed. He compares our Po- 
lice Department with the police of London, and it 
is by comparison that we are enabled to judge of 
what is best. London has a population of about 
4,000,000; it is governed by a Police Depart- 
ment under one head. The population of 



Brooklyn is perhaps in the neighborhood 
of five or six hundred thousand. It is governed by 
a commission. The gentleman speaks of the secur- 
ity with which a person travels through any part 
of the city of London ; and it is a well-known fact 
that since the establishment of the commission in 
the city of Brooklyn more abuses have been created 
than ever existed in the department with one head. 
In the appointment of men upon the police force 
experience is the last qualification considered. 
They are geneially taken as men are for the 
army — raw recruits. It don't make any difference 
what a man was, if they are properly drilled they 
will become good police, just the same as an effi- 
cient army can be made out of raw recruits. 

The President— The Chair would state that the 
debate is allowed only upon reasons why the main 
question should or should not be put. 

Mr. Burke urged that one reason why the main 
question should not be put was, that the ad- 
vocates of the order had had an opportunity 
to express their views and the opponents had not. 
It was very strange, if there were any abuses in 
the Police Department such as had been com- 
plained of, why they had n't been reported. He 
was willing to hear both sides of the subject. 

On motion of Mr. Rosnosky of Ward 16, the 
yeas and nays were ordered on the previous ques- 
tion. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 hoped the previous 
question would not be put, as it was then half- 
past eleven o'clock and it was desirable that there 
should be more investigation. In reply to Mr. 
Shepard's remark about the courtesy of the 
Street Commissioners, he said that the board 
were elected from the people and by the people. 

The main roll was called with the following 
result: 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Colby, 
Crocker, Danforth, Day, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Ho'l- 
lis, Howl and, Lauten, Mo wry, Nason, Perham, 
Plimpton, J. B._Richardson, M. W. Richardson, 
Roberts, Rust, jk. H. Sampson, O. H. Sampson, 
H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Smith, J. F. Taylor, 
Thompson, Toppan, Ward, Webster, Wolcott, 
Wyman— 33. 

Nays— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall.N. Y. 
Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Cox, Denny, Devlin, 
Doherty Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, Kelley, Ken- 
dricken, Kidney, Lovering, McDonald, McGahey, 
McGaragle, McGeough, Mullane, Mullen, O'Con- 
nor, Roach, Rosnosky, Santry, Shepard, Spenceley, 
J. Taylor, Whicher, Wilson, Woolley— 33. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Coe, Pearl, Pierce, 
Sibley— 4. 

When the name of Mr. Thorndike of Ward 2 
was called he arose and said that he should vote 
against the commission, but he had paired with 
Mr. Coe, who was absent. 

There being a tie-vote, the President voted yes, 
and the main question was declared ordered — 
yeas 34, nays 33; and the question came up on 
giving the order a second reading. 

Mr. Spenceley moved to especially assign the 
order to next Thursday evening at nine o'clock. 

Mr. Thompson raised the point of order that the 
motion was not in order, and the Chair ruled the 
point well taken. 

The order was declared ordered to a second 
reading. 

Mr. McGaragle doubted the vote, and on his 
motion the yeas and nays were ordered. The or- 
der was passed to a second reading— yeas 34, 
nays 32: 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Colby, 
Crocker, Danforth, Day, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Hol- 
lis, Howland, Lauten, Mowry, Nason, Perham, 
Plimpton, J. B. Richardsou, M. W. Richardson, 
Roberts, Rust, E. H. Sampson, O. H. Sampson, H. 
N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, Smith, J. F. Tay- 
lor, Thompson, Toppan, Ward, Webster, Wolcott, 
Wyman— 34. 

Nays— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, N. 
Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Cox. Denny, Dev- 
lin, Doherty, Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, Kelley, 
Kendricken, Kidney, Lovering, McDonald, Mc- 
Gahey, McGaragle, McGeough, Mullane, Mullen, 
O'Connor, Roach, Rosnosky, Santry, Spenceley, 
J. Taylor, Whicher, Wilson, Woolley— 32. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Coe, Pearl, 
Pierce, Sibley, Thorndike— 5. 

The order was read a second time and put upon 
its passage. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 1G moved to adjourn. 

On motion of Mr Thompson the yeas aud nays 
were ordered on the motion to adjourn, and the 
motion was lost— yeas 33, nays 34: 

Yeas — Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, 



80 



COMMON COUNCIL 



N. Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Cox, Denny, Dev- 
lin, Doherty, Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, kelley, 
Kendricken, Kidney, Lovering, McDonald, Mc- 
Gahey, McGaragle, McGeough, .Mullane, Mullen, 
O'Connor, Roach, Bosnosky, Santry. Snenceley, 
J. Taylor, Thorndike. Whi( tier, Wilson, "Woolley, 
—33. 

Nays— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Colbv. 
Crocker, Danfortb, Day, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Hol- 
lis, Howl. mil. Lauten, Mowry, Nason, Pearl, Per- 
hani, Plimpton, J. B. Bichardson, H. W . Richard- 
son, Roberts, Rust, E. H, Sampson, O. H. Samp- 
sod, H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Sheiiard, Smith, 
J. F. Taylor, Thompson, Toppan, Ward, Webster, 
Wolcott, Wyiuan— 34. 

Absent or not voting— Coe, Pierce, Pope, Sibley 

Mr. Barry moved mat farther consideration of 
the subject be specially assigned to next Thurs- 
day evening at nine o'clock," and called for the 
yeas and nays upon the question. 

Mr. Thompson did n't object to a reasonable 
amount of debate, but the motion was made 
purely for purposes of delay, and he felt justified 
in moviug the previous question. 

Mr. Barry denied that the motion was made for 
delay ; he should vote against the commission and 
he wanted to give his reasons. 

Mr. Brawley thought courtesy demanded fur- 
ther time; only one side had discussed the ques- 
tion. 

Mr. Crocker reminded Mr. Brawley of the last 
meeting, wheojMr. Spenceley insisted upon the 
rule limiting debate on laying on the table. 

Mr. McGaragle said there was no need of hurry, 
as the matter is before the Legislature. 

Mr. Flynn moved to table, and called for the 
yeas and nays. 

The Chair said he thought that motion dila- 
tory. 

Mr. Barry wanted the issue met and discussed 
fairly and squarely. If a majority wanted the 
commission, he would wash his hands of it; but 
he wanted an opportunity to give his reasons. 

Mr. Spenceley quoted from Sis remarks at the 
last meeting to show that he desired delay to 
give time tor investigation ol the merits and de- 
merits of the question. 

Mr. Rosnosky said that if it was so good a 
thing it would keep another week. 

Mr. McGaragle said it was four minutes of 
twelve o'clock, and that was a good reason for 
laying it ovei. 

Sir. Webster said that he noticed that when ne 
was in the minority he wanted more time, and 
when in the majority he wanted to clinch a mat- 
ter. He hoped it would not be postponed. 

Mr. Barry said two wrougs do not make a right, 
and Mr. Webster should be generous. 

Mr. McGaragle thought the miuority ought to 
have an equal chance with the others. 

Mr. Brawley said the desire to carry a point is 
one thing, but to ask for delay is another. If he 
was in the majority he would vote to give time 
for debate, as he bad done on a previous occasion. 

Mr. Burke moved to adjourn. 

Mr. Thompson raised the point that no business 
had been transacted since the last action on a 
motion to adjourn. 

The Chair ruled that debate in this sense was 
the transaction of business. 

The question on adjournment was put, and, the 
Chair being in doubt, on motion of Mr. Thomp- 
son the yeas and nays were ordered. 

Mr. McGaragle asked it the Council could trans- 
act business on a legal holiday, it then being past 
twelve o'clock. 

The motion to adjourn was lost— yeas 33, nays 
'34: 

Yeas— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, N. 
Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Cox, Denny, Devlin, 
Doherty, Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, Kelfey, Ken- 
dricken, Kidney, Lovering, McDonald, McGahey, 
McGaragle, McGeough, Mullane, Mullen, O'Con- 



nor, Roach, Rosnosky, Santry, Spenceley, J. Tay- 
l or, Thorndike, Whicher, Wilson, Woolley— 33. 

Nays— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Colby. 
Crocker, Danforth, Day, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Hol- 
lis, Howland, Lauten, Mowry. Nation, Perham, 
Plimpton, J. B. Richardson, "M. W. Richardson, 
Roberts, Bust. K. H. Sampson, O. H. Sampson, 
H. N. Sawyer, X. Sawyer, Shepard, Smith. J. F. 
Taylor, Thompson, Toppan, Ward, Webster, Wol- 
cott, Wyman— 34. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Coe, Pearl, Pierce, 
Sibley— 4. 

The' motion to table was put, and the Chair be- 
ing in doubt, the yeas and nays were ordered on 
motion ot Mr. McGaragle. The motion was lost- 
yeas 33, nays 34: 

Yeas — Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, \. 
Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Cox, Denny, Devlin, 
Doherty, Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, Kelley, Ken- 
dricken, Kidney, Lovering, McDonald, McGahey, 
McGaragle, McGeough, Mullane, Mullen, O'Con- 
nor, Roach, Rosnosky, Santry, Spenceley, J.Taylor, 
Thorndike, Whicher, Wilson, Woolley— 33. 

Nays — Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Colby, 
Crocker, Danforth, Day, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, 
Hollis, Howland, Lauten, Mowry, Nason, Per- 
ham, Plimpton, J. B. Richardson, M. W. Rich- 
ardson, Roberts, Rust, E. H. Sampson, O. H. 
Sampson, H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, 
Smith, J. F. Taylor, Thompson, Toppan, Ward, 
Webster, Wolcott, Wyman -34. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. Coe, Pearl, Pierce, 
Sibley— 4. 

Mr. Rosnosky moved to adjourn. Declared lost. 
Mr. McGaragle doubted the vote, and on his mo- 
tion the yeas and nays were ordered and the mo- 
tion to adjourn was lost— yeas 25, nays 34: 

Yeas— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, N. 
Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Cox, Devlin, Dry- 
nan, Flyun, Kelley, Lovering, McDonald, Mc- 
Gahey, McGaragle, McGeough, Mullen, O'Connor. 
Roach, Rosnosky, Sautry, Spenceley, Thorndike, 
Wilson, Woolley— 25. 

Nays— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Colby, 
Crocker, Danforth, Day, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Hol- 
lis. Howlaud, Lauten, Mowry, Nason, Perham, 
Plimpton, J. B. Richardson, M. W. Richardson, 
Roberts, Rust, E. H. Sampson, O. H. Sampson, 
H.N.Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, Smith, J. F. 
Taylor, Thompson, Toppan, Ward, Webster, Wol- 
cott, Wyman — 34. 

Absent or not voting —Messrs. Coe. Denny, 
Doherty, Fernald, Kendricken, Kidney, Mullane, 
Pearl, Pierce, Sibley, J. Taylor, Whicher— 12. 

Mr. Crocker called attention to the fact that 
many gentlemen were leaving the room, so as to 
leave the Council without a quorum. 

on motion of Mr. Crocker the roll was called to 
ascertain if a quorum was present: 

Present— Coolidge, Brown, Clapp, Colby. Crock- 
er, Danforth, Day, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Hollis, 
Howland, Lauten," McDonald, Mowry, Nason, Per- 
ham, Plimpton, J. B. Richardson, M.W. Richard- 
BOO, Boberts, Rust. E. H. Sampson, O. H. Sampson, 
H.N.Sawyer, N.Sawyer, Shepard, Smith, J. P. 
Taylor. Thompson, Toppan, Ward, Webster, Wol- 
cott, Woolley, Wyman— 3C. 

Absent— Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, N. Y. 
Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Coe, Cox. Denny, Dev- 
lin. Doherty, Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, Kelley, 
Kendricken, Kidney, Lovering, McGahey, McGar- 
agle, McGeough, Mullane, Mullen, O'Connor, 
Pearl, Pierce, Roach, Rosnosky, Santry, Sibley, 
Spenceley, J. Taylor, Thorndike. Whicher, Wilson 
—3.".. 

A quorum was present. 

The main question was ordered, and the order 
was passed in concurrence. 

On motion of Mr. Sampson of Ward IT, the rule 
was suspended, and he then moved a reconsid- 
eration of the passage of the order, hoping it 
would not prevail. 
Mr. Spenceley moved to adjourn. Lost. 

The reconsideration was lost. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Brown of Ward 23. 



61 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOS TON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

FEBRUARY <25, 1878. 



Regular meeting at Tour Vclock P.M., Alder- 
man Siehbins, Chairman, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Coal Weigher— Alonzo H. Stowell. Confirmed. 
Special Police Officer— Thomas Merritt. Con- 
tinued. 
Undertaker— John M'Caffrey. Confirmed. 

PETITIONS REFERRED. 

To Committee on Nomination oj Wetjher and 
Inspector oj Lighters, i. J. .daiiiu, iur cuiel of 
said "rtir^. 

To the Committee on Claims Lucy A. Sidwell, 
to lie paid Im pel -on.il ii. juries received on ac- 
count ol an allege i defect hi sidewalk 154 Welister 
street. John McDermott, to he paid lor personal 
injuries r-ceived while In the employ ol the city. 

To the Committ e e on Lamps. Michael F. Lynch 

1 1 nl , i ii.i t .-.iin.- actio. • tie taken 10 cause a re- 
dui'lion in the price ol gas in l he Dorche.-ter Dis- 
trict; G. Warren Allen et at , that I \inps he locat- 
ed in passageway rear ol Columnus avenue, 
Holyoke -tieet an l Berwick nark. 

To the Committee on Health on the Dart of the 
Jioard. Lamm A.Noycs, lor le.ive 10 excavate 
his cellar at 257 Sunnier street to a depth two feet 
helow e-t ihh.-heii grade. 

Petitions lor leave to occupy stables —P>y L S. 
Howard, new wooden, two horses, Lincoln slieet, 
Ward 24; C. E Paige, old wooden, two additional 
horses, 012 Finh street; H. S. Lawrence, new 
wooaen, one h.ii-i-, 2.S28 Washington street; Mark 
Mor-e, new brick, 2 horses. Athens street, rear 
Cb in factoiy. 

To the Committee on Paving. S D. Smith et 
a/., in j i gutter* on Alt. Veiuon sireet, W»st Kox- 
burx, be paved; Edward P. McNullx, to he com- 
pensated lor damages to his property caused hy 
change ol grade on Savin Hill avenue; Conk & 
H am iv, lo be allowed compensation from the i i y 
for Bpriiikllog a portion t>l Duilex sireet in 1877; 
A. B. Pratt, lor license for watering streets; Isaac. 
PratC Jr., et al., that Gordon, AShlord, Linden 
and Cbel>ei stieets he macadamized, elc; George 
F. Parker et al , ibat North Beacon street, irom 
Uniou square lo the Watenown line, he mat ad- 
amized ; Steiiben Hill et al , that Franklin sireet, 
Ward 25, be raised aim macadamized; Swam* & 
George, ior lea ve to set telegiaph poles on West- 
ern avenue and Market street, Brighton. Thomas 
Doane, ibat the new street leading Irom Wesley 
street, Cliarlestown, he called Hidden row. 

HEARING ON PETITION FOB STEAM ENGINE. 

i be petition of Moultna & Goodwill, for leave 

to loca e and Use a steam engine and holler al 119- 
123 Water street, was considered on an order of 
DotlCe lor a hearing. No one appeared to object, 
and the petition was referred to the Committee ou 
Steam Ei giues. 

SOUTH BOSTON RAILROAD. 

A hearing was bad on the petition of the South 
Koslou Kadioad Company for a location ol tracks 
in ceilatn streets and over Dover-street Bridge; 
also ior leave to u>e the tracks ol Metropolitan 
Railroad Company in Alilk, State, Congiess and 
Devonshire streets. 

Mr. Crosby, president of the petitioning cor- 
poration, said the location was uo° ineielv a mat- 
ter ot convenience, tiut of necessity. The only 
means ol communication with the cny at present 
hy horse citis is by Federal-street Bridge, which 
lias heen obstructed by collapse of a sewer, fire 

and rioioiis proceeding*, and there was no c - 

uitiuication with the ciiy proper by cars while 
the budge was clo-ed. There is quite a laige 
amouut ot travel daily between South Kosion 
and the Souib End, and Mr. Crosby read leiters 
to show that tneie are South Ko-lnn pupils In the 
higher schools as lollows: Girl*' High, 85; Public 
Latin, 44; English High. 102; Nonual School, 18. 
Camnrioge and Cliarlestown are hoib connei ted 
with Hon too by two I ridges in which aie boise- 
car tracks, aim travel in never slopped between 
the city ami those places. He explained the loute 
and presented a plau ol the same. The South 
Boston and Metropolitan companies have been 



the only ones which have ever done anything to 
relieve tue Mock in fremont street, and the latter 
part "if the petition is to enable this company to 
run some ol Its depot cars via Milk street. 

Mr. « oolidge, engineer lor tbeSouib Koston 
Railroad* testified that the hum' er of persons 
who went over ihe Dover-street Bridge and the 
Broadway extension, as taken by bun, was as fol- 
lows: Ou Fen. 15, 3702 persons win loward South 
Boston, and 3419 went irom South llo-ton; on the 
I61 h, 4160 went toward South Huston, aud 3518 
from South liosioii ; on Feb. 20,3583 went toward 
South Boston, aud 3544 from Souih Koston. Over 
Broadway extension— Fed. 19, toward South Bos- 
ton, 4314. liom South Boston. 4319; on tbe 20th, 
4020 toward South Boston, and 3098 Irom South 
Boston. He had measured the distance irom 
where tbe proposed new track starts from the 
loot of Broadway to Dover street and Hairison 
avenue aud to tbe corner of Beach and Washing- 
ton streets, aud louud that tbe new route would 
save a distance 01 7700 leet, and by the new route 
via Dover sireet the uistance was 2220 feet, a sav- 
ing ot 4445 feet. If a person wauted to go tbe 
same way by i he Highland road tbe new route 
would he a saving ol 5220 leet If one were going 
to Alt. Pleasant, the Saving over the Metropolitan 
road would he 11(H), aud by the Sbawmut avenue 
route 6000 leet. He rode over the route from the 
loot ol hradway to Federal-street Bridge and 
Harrison avenue to Williams Market, and it took 
some seventeen minutes, aud walked back hy the 
new route in seven aud a hall niiuute-. The dif- 
ference in time, 11 he bad ridden, would be about 
twelve minutes. 

Mr. Crosby her? rested tbe case. 

P. A. Collins appeared for a committee of six- 
teen appointed al a meeting ot citizens in South 
Boston Saturday evening, and pieseuted resolu- 
tions passeo at tbe meeting. Mr. Collins said that 
a lew years ago he had occasion to collect statistics 
in regard to the daily travel to and Irotu South 
Boston over Federal-street Bridge. There were 
about 225 vessels passed up and down the outer 
draw ol the outh Bostou bridges, 17,000 teams, 
800 horse cars and about 45,000 people on loot; and 
about 10,000 people directed their steps toward the 
soutberu part ol tbe city rather than down town. 

The people of South Boston have felt that they 
weie rather put aside and not treated as olber 
sections ot the city are. There is only one means 
ot communication hy car with the city, and none 
diiect with the South End and Highlands. Mr. 
Collins called W. W. Nichols, who said the people 
unanimously desired tins privilege. Filteeu thou- 
sand people pass over Dover-street or Kioadway 
Kridge d«ily, and this rouie would he a great con- 
venience to them. Tbe people should be consid- 
ered iu this matter, and not the railroad compa- 
nies. 

Senator Thomas Gogin of South Boston spoke 
01 the large number 01 pupil- going Irom South 
Koston to tbe Girls' High School at the South 
End, many ol whom remained ai home in gloomy 
weatnei becau-e tbeir pareuts could not afford to 
pay tumble lares. He said the newspapers bad 
put words 1 11 1 11 his mouth that he never uttered 
at the Saturday evening, and be presumed it was 
the case with other speakeis there. He thought 
th proposed route would save the children a 
great deal ot time in going to school. 

Charles J. Noyes said no section was so poorly 
accommodated 1 y horse cais as South Boston. and 
they do not have ibe facilities they are entitled to. 
The sentiment there is unanimous in lavor ol this 
petition, and tbe people bave reason to feel it. 
Thetilteen tbou-aml people who walkover the 
Dover-stieet and Kroadway bridges are entitled 
to some consideration. 

Mr. Reed, theTieasurer of the South Koston 
road, s. id th it the average number of transfer 
tickets used hetweeu June and Deceintier was 
46,300 per mouth by people who go to the South 
End. A limit 40,000 ol these are Metropolitan and 
ahout 6100 aie Highland tickets. About seven- 
eighths ot these persons, be bail reason to believe, 
went, above Dover street. He knew that hy count- 
ing 1 ho e who leave the cars on Harrison avenue. 

Mr. Choate, President 01 the Old Colony Rail- 
road Company, appeared to protest against tbe 
granting ol tiiis petition. Tnev bave no pecunia- 
ry iuteiest in the petition, hut they thought tbe 
danger which must lollow the granting of this 
petition compelled tbeiu to come here. He ex- 
plained the location of the engine houses of tbe 
road. There are lorty trains a day, and lor each 
tram in and out tbe engine must pass Doverstreet 
twice, which would make 160 times daily. That is 



FEB RU A 33. Y 25 



18 7 8 



82 



the case at this season of the year; in the summer 
the number would be greatly increased. It would 
be something like 200 daily. By actual count ou last 
Friday the whole number of locomotives which 
passed that point between 7 A. M. and 7 P. M. was 
184,averaging fifteen an hour,or one in five minutes. 
He submitted that the horse cars could not be run 
there without danger to the passengers both by 
horse and steam cars. Men will sometimes fail in 
vigilance, and he felt that some time there would 
be an accident at this point if this petition is 
granted. He suggested that the Broadway ex- 
tension .vould be a much more preferable route. 
Mr. Choate was questioned by Paul H. West in re- 
gard to the Old Colony crossing in South Boston 
and the comparative danger attending the pas- 
sage of cars and teams. As a rule the gates are 
shut, but once or twice an engine has run through 
a gate. 

Mr. Kendrick, Superintendent of the Old Colony 
Railroad Company,^>resented a plan of the cross- 
ing and the location of the round houses, etc., 
which Mr. Choate explained. He considered the 
crossing the most dangerous one the road had. 
There are four men employed at the gate, part of 
the time two, and part three. 

Mr. Powers, President of the Middlesex Rail- 
road Company, inquired how it is proposed to 
use the tracks of his road in Washington street, 
and Mr. Crosby explained that it was to run some 
of the depot cars via Milk street, for which he 
would come to the Board and ask permission at 
the proper time. 

Mr. Richards, President of the .Metropolitan 
road, said that a portion of the petition, as usual, 
asks for leave to enter upon the tracks of the 
company he represented, and were it not for that 
he would not remonstrate. The President of the 
South Boston road had not said how many cars he 
desires to run or how often and for what purpose 
over Dover-street Bridge, to intersect the Metro- 
politan tracks, and he puts a tail to his kite by 
asking to run cars on the new tracks lately laid 
by the Metropolitan road. The South Boston 
President was very unassuming. Awhile 
ago his directors did him the honor to reelect him, 
and selected some smart and energetic gentlemen 
to act with him ; and this looked as though they 
must do something smart and quick to show that 
they are going to give the people of South Boston 
more advantages than they ever had before; and 
after cogitating upon it they thought the best 
thing was to pitch into the Metropolitan road and 
take away some of their business, which has be- 
come a settled characteristic with all the rail- 
roads. They had also imitated the example of the 
Highland road in regard to the Columbus-avenue 
tracks, and got up a public meeting, which was 
no doubt well attended, and though the speakers 
were a little intemperate in what they said, 
they have come here and taken it back. They 
had" worked the people of South Boston up to a 
most extraordinary degree and persuaded their 
eminent legal citizens to come here ; but the ouly 
evidence they have presented is that a few school 
Children want to go to the South End. They had 
not presented so good a case as did the Lynn & 
Boston and the Cambridge roads. As an individ- 
ual and a taxpayer he desired the people of South 
Boston to have all the accommodation they need- 
ed. He had lived at the South End twenty-three 
years, and in walking down Washington street 
he would be as much surprised to see a South 
Boston man as he would be to see Sitting Bull 
himself; and he was not aware until to- 
day that so many South Boston people toiled over 
the Broadway extension and Dover-street Bridge 
to the South End. If they got this location he did 
not believe seventy-five out of eighty school girls 
would walk to the Normal School ; rather would 
they buy a Metropolitan or Highland transfer 
check and ride. Last year the South Boston Com- 
pany bitterly opposed an omnibus line over this 
same route; they asked his assistance and he 
heartily joined with them. They used the same 
arguments against the coach line that he now 
uses against this location; andif they felt sure that 
the Board would not license the omnibus line they 
would never have come here in the world. But 
they want to secure the business of the Metro- 
politan road, which first put its capital into this 
enterprise: and when he comes and asks the 
Board not to let another line take away the 
honest earnings he is sneered at, and the Board 
are sneered at because lib asked it. But if there 
is a man at the Board to whom he had said a word 
against the petitions of other roads, in the sense 
of log-rolling, let him rise and say so, and he 



would never show his face in the hall 
again. The Metropolitan road can get no 
more rights from the Board than it is 
entitled to. The company had built up 
the outlying sections, and" did not deserve 
to have its business given to another. The Broad- 
way extension was a much better route than this, 
and they could come down Albauy street, against 
which he would not say a word. But he protested 
against the invasion of the honest rights of his 
company in Washington street. There are 626 
cars a day passing the corner of Dover and Wash- 
ington streets, 396 of which pass through Harri- 
son avenue, and 191 cars pass through Dover 
street from Tremont street. The strongest oppo- 
sition to the recently laid track n Washington 
street was from the abutters near Cobb, 
Bates & Yerxa, the narrowest part of the 
street. He did n't believe any more cars 
could go there. It was not right to put them 
there, both on account of the crowded state of the 
street, and because of its taking away the Met- 
ropolitan busiuess. He could fill twenty Wait's 
Halls with meetings in favor of running his cars 
to South Beston. In reply to Mr. Choate Mr. 
Richards said he had two or three dangerous 
crossings on his roads and they had come so near 
killing people as to make the hair stand on end. 

Mr. Coolidge was recalled and gave the number 
of times the gates at Dover-street Bridge were 
shut across the street as 148 on Feb. 15, or 
11 53-100ths minutes of every hour, averaging 
1 4-10ths minutes at each opening. There were 
two men operating the gates. At the Causeway- 
street crossing of the Boston & Maine road the 
gates were shut fifteen times between 5 and 6 P. 
M., averaging one minute in shutting. Four men 
were employed there. 

Joseph A. Torrey was called by Mr. Crosby, and 
stated that on Feb. 20 and 21 he counted the num- 
ber of passengers going to the South End from 
the corner of Beach street and Harrison avenue 
between 8 A. M. and 6 P. M.; 49 got in and 67 got 
out between Beach and Dover streets, and in 
eighty-two trips, 149 passengers got in and 16 got 
out. The cars were about half tilled in the mid- 
dle of the day. From Williams Market to the cor- 
ner of Summer street, 73 got in and 7 got out one 
way, and 76 in and 9 out the other way. 

Mr. Crosby said that all they would take from 
Mr. Richards's cars was shown to be very small, 
and they would pay three cents mileage and re- 
ceive one cent. The cars by this route were to 
run down Washington street to Summer, and out 
again by Milk, Hawley and Harrison avenue to 
Dover street again. They wanted to run from 
seven to ten cars an hour. In summer the travel 
will be largely increased over the bridge. 

Mr. Collins said South Boston peopl- were met 
by a much more dangerous railway on Federal 
street; but horse cars can be stopped by brakes; 
a team cannot if the horse becomes unmanagea- 
ble. The question for the Board is, whether pub- 
lic convenience and necessity require that South 
Boston people shall be accommodated the same 
as other sections. He doubted if all the lawyers 
and orators in South Boston could make so pa- 
thetic an appeal to the Board. All classes de- 
sire to go to the South End, and people 
in other sections desire* to go to South Boston; 
and they desire to go by the most convenient 
mode of conveyance. He cared not what any of 
the railroad corporations wanted; he wanted to 
see the people accommodated. He spoke at some 
length in answer to the plea that the Broadway 
extension is a better 'route, dwelling upon 
the fact that it would not carry them 
where they wanted to go. There" is al- 
ways danger in travelling, and he admitted 
the danger of the Dover-street crossing; but he 
considered the Federal-street crossing the most 
dangerous in the city. If two men are not suffi- 
cient to make the Dover-street crossing safe, they 
should employ four men. 

Mr. West explained the statute regulating the 
crossing of steam tracks by horse railroads, and 
said the horse railroad company and the public 
were willing to take the risk. 

The petition was recommitted to the Committee 
on Paving. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Report and order for Street Commissioners to 
lay out as public streets the avenues leading to 
the ferry slips from Commercial to Sumner 
street. 

In reply to a question by Alderman Haris, Al- 
derman McLeau stated that these avenues had 



83 



BOARD O'F ALDERMEN 



never been laid out as public streets, and though 
the Street Commissioners were in tavor of doing 
so, they preferred to have an order from the City 
Council requesting them to do so. 

Alderman Harris ilia not object to the meas- 
ure, Out thought it should emanate from the 
Street Commissioners, and on his motion the or- 
der was referred to that Board. 

Sent down. 

Report ami order allowing the Directors of 
feast Boston Ferries to contract for fuel tor the 
next financial year. Passed. 

Sent down. 

Report and orders to allow the Directors of East 
Boston Ferries to purchase a new boat and to sell 
the old boat "General (I rant." 

Aldennau Harris asked for some explanation as 
to the expediency ot this. 

Alderman McLean snid the Grant is a spare 
boat, too long tor the service', more expensive 
to manage than a ferry boat should be, and takes 
longer to load and unload her than is convenient. 
She is also unwieldy, and a dangerous boat to 
use. It is deemed best to dispose of her, and pro- 
cure another spare boat to use in case of one of 
the other boats being disabled. 

Alderman Viles said he had been on the Ferry 
Committee for three years, and heartily concurred 
in this order. At the time the Winthrop was 
buiit he thought the Grant ought to be sold in- 
stead of the Adams. 

The orders were passed after an amendment, 
offered by Alderman Harris, was adopted, insert- 
ing that, the sale should tie made "after public ad- 
vertisement" shall have been made. Sent down. 

Order lor the Inspector of Buildings to report 
the names and locations of all public buildiDgs 
not provided with proper facilities ol egress, etc. 
Laid on the table, on motion of Alderman McLean, 
i#ho said be made the motion with the consent of 
the mover, as the Inspector expected to make a 
report ou the subject shortly, and the passage of 
this order might interfere with some facts of the 
report. 

Order for Chief of Police to enforce the exist- 
ing ordinances and orders relating to obstructions 
in the public streets. Passed. 

COMMON AM) PUBLIC <;l!OI Mis. 

The report and order in favor ot placing the 
charge of the Common and public grounds in the 
hands of the Paik Commissioners were considered 
under unfinished business, the question being on 
the passage of the order. 

Alderman Slade— 11 I am right, it is sixteen 
years since the only public ground in Boston was 
the Common. I think it. is about sixteen years 
since they commenced to improve the Public 
Garden, and during that time we have annexed 
three or four cities with their public grounds; and 
I believe in nearly every instance, with the excep- 
tion of Charlestown — the two squares there were in 
good condition— all of our public giounds have 
had to he created, and some ot' them at very 
great expense. If I am rightly informed, every 
piece of ground that the city owns has been grad- 
ed, and is quite complete with the exception of a 
little grading around the monument, and a little 
grading to what is called Orchard Park. How 
much will ever be done to that piece of ground 1 
don't know. Now, I will not attempt to name the 
grounds that the city owns as public parks, but in 
the meantime Commonwealth avenue has been 
taken care of by the Committee on Public 
Grounds and built at a great expense. 1 believe 
it has cost aboc.t ten thousand dollars for each 
square, to build and fence it and do all the work, 
and grade and bring them up to the splendid con- 
dition that they are in now. I believe 1 have 
stated all the grounds that need grading whatev- 
er, and all that has to be done to the public 
grounds now is to keep them in order anil in the 
condition that they are now in. It is a matter ot 
taste with us, whether they are well kept, or not, 
and whether there are too many trees and flow- 
ers, or not enough — some believing that there are 
not enough trees and some pro and con, and al- 
most every man has his taste. Within the last 
year, since I have been on the committee, it has 
been my pleasure to show our public grounds to a 
great many people from abroad. We all know 
that it has been noised far and wide that the pub- 
lic grounds of Boston are the most beautiful that 
can be found anywhere in this country ; and I am 
assured by people in Boston who have been across 
the water and visited places that we have read 
about there, that, arriving in our own city, they 
have found our own public grounds more beauti- 



ful than anything they have seen anywhere else. 
I don't see how it could be possible for any spot to 
be made more beautiful than the Public Garden 
and Commonwealth avenue and many of the 
small public parks of the city of Boston. In view 
of all these facts, I don't see why we should want 
to put it out of our bauds and put it in charge of 
the Park Commissioners. When this subject of 
parks was first talked about, the Park Com- 
missioners volunteered, without pay, to make the 
selections from the different grounds around 
Boston to carry out the idea that was ex- 
pressed by the majority of the people a 
few years ago that some public parks were 
necessary. They volunteered to do that, and 
have done so. Now, why shall we ask those men 
to take this business and carry it on without pay? 
For one, I should be ashamed to say that I, as a 
member of the Committee on Common, felt un- 
qualified, or, with a good Superintendent, was n't 
willing to have it done. Trtere is no rilling or 
grading to be done; we have simply to take care 
of the surface and plant such shrubbery and flow- 
ers as are necessary. Now, I should be ashamed 
to ask the Park Commiss'ioners to do this work 
without pay. If I was sent here for any purpose 
it was to do my part of this work, or any other 
piece ot work that comes before us. If 1 am not 
willing to do it I have no business here. Every- 
body knows I am opposed to commissions any 
way. This will be a non-paying commission, to be 
sure, but that is so much worse, for it looks like 
shirking the work on to somebody else. We see it 
stated that the State ih paying four hundred thou- 
sand dollars a year for commissions) and now that 
the city of Boston is starting into commissions I 
am opposed to it. I hope we shall try to take care 
of the public grounds ourselves, for 1 should be 
ashamed to say I was unqualified to do so. 

Alderman Faunce— The Alderman asks what we 
are here for. I suppose it is to do the business in 
the best and most economical manner. In look- 
ing over the Auditor's report for 1877, I find that 
it takes about $750 to $800 per acre to take care of 
our public grounds. Thirty-odd thousand dollars 
a year are spent on Boston Common; seventeen 
hundred dollars a year for a little park in Rox- 
bury, with no flowers or grass, and i believe with 
very little grading. My object in wishing to 
change this is for economy's sake entirely. ' We 
h^ve a beautiful garden, but I think it can be 
carried on for a very much less expense. He says 
it is too much work for those gentlemen to do. 
We haven't asked them to do it; they have of- 
fered to do it. It seems to me, as a matter of 
economy in expenditure, they had better have 
charge of it. 

Alderman Slade— I cannot see where this econo- 
my comes in. I don't know that there has n't 
been thirty thousand dollars expended annually 
on the Common. Last year there were several 
thousand dollars spent upon the hill around the 
monument, and it created a terrible scandal. 
That monument has cost the city nearly two hun- 
dred thousand dollars. The Monument Commit- 
tee desired that there should be something done 
to make the grounds around it correspond to the 
great work that has been placed there. I agree 
that the money should have been asked for and 
contributed by the city before the work »vas com- 
menced; but I don't see how it could be done for 
less. I don't see how these commissioners could 
do the work for any less. They are only going to 
be superintendents. As I said, we need n't do 
half as much as we have done. It will cost about 
fifty-four thousand dollars a year to take care of 
the pcblic grounds where it lias cost seventy-five 
thousand In previous years. This is all because 
there is no grading to be done. Gentlemen can 
remember when the Frog Pond was a mud hole, 
and when the whole ground that is beyond what 
is called Flagstaff riill was a low, muddy, filthy 
place. That has all been filled np and brought up 
to a beautiful grade and I have never heard 
anybody find any fault with it. I don't see 
how the work can be done any better by. these 
commissioners than it can be by this committee. 
1 pretend to know something about it, and I think 
there are other members of the Hoard who know 
something about it. Whoever is Superintendent 
of Common, all we have got to do is to tell him 
that he must n't spend so much money. I have 
no doubt the labor will be hired at less this year 
than last year, as there seems to be a desire to 
reduce the price of labor a trifle. But I don't be- 
lieve there has been much labor thrown away. I 
don't know whether the committee were justified 
in employing so many men last year or not, but 



FEBRUARY 25, 187 8. 



84 



still there was a very large number of laboring 
men out of employment last year, and almost every 
one claimed that he had a right to a part of this 
work; and there was a portion of the time, per- 
haps I might say a large part of the time, during 
the six months that the work was done a part of 
the men were changed once in two weeks. They 
were not changed because it was the desire of the 
Superintendent or the committee, but it was the 
terrible pressure that the laboring men brought 
to get a few weeks' work to buy a ton of coal or a 
barrel of flour, and it is possible that the work 
was n't ctone so economically as it might have 
been done. This committee can do all that the 
Park Commissioners can do if they see tit, and I 
don't see how it is possible for the Park Commis- 
sioners to do this work any cheaper or give any 
better satisfaction to the people than the commit- 
tee have done with a superintendent. I, for one, 
want to try it, and I hate to give it up. 

Alderman Guild— I don't think the real point in 
this matter has been touched. I propose to go at 
it fearlessly, and handle it without gloves. I have 
some documentary evidence that I propose to 
submit, and I do not intend to make any very ex- 
tended remarks; but what I do say, I propose to 
back up by accepted evidence. In the first 
place, the necessity for a permaneiit system in the 
management of the public grounds of the city 
must be apparent to every one. There is a large 
amount of work which can be profitably planned 
for at least a year in advance. The laying out and 
beautifying of grounds can be carried on one year 
at a time, without reference to the future, but no 
private citizen manages his gardens and lawns in 
this way. The best results are not attainable, but 
the greatest expense is involved, under this 
system. No one knows what is to be need- 
ed next year until next year comes, and 
the result is that many opportunities for econ- 
omy are lost, from lack of permanence in the sys- 
tem. The Park Commission will have the care of 
the new parks. It is fair to suppose that it will 
be composed of men who are experts in this busi- 
ness — men of cultivated taste and trained judg- 
ment— and they will devote their close attenton 
to this question. Surely no one will claim that a 
committee of the City Council, shifting every 
year, can do this work as well as such a commis- 
sion. Even more important than this is the 
necessity for removing all outside influences 
which now interfere with the economical man- 
agement of the public grounds. No one who is 
familiar with the matter doubts that on this ac- 
count the present system costs the city thousands 
of dollars every year. Whatever other qualities a 
City Forester may possess, it is certain that he will 
be human. No man in his place, dependent upon 
the votes of the Aldermen and Councilmen for his 
position, can be independent of their influence. 
This is not a matter of opinion merely, but is 
rather one of historical fact. The joint special 
committee of the last City Council appointed to 
investigate as to the alleged neglect of duty in 
this department went into this very fully. Their 
finding is as follows, which I read from the print- 
ed report of their investigations : 

"The manner in which laborers are procured to 
work on the Common and Public Garden (through 
the 'influence' or by the recommendation of mem- 
bers of the City Council) is an unqualified nuisance 
and wrong; it has grown up under our system of 
government, but it is bad in every particular — 
bad for the Alderman or Common Councilman 
who is put to the inconvenience of begging or de- 
manding the situation sought for; bad' for the la- 
borer who gets and holds his situation only 
through the favor of the Alderman or Common 
Councilman; and bad for the city which has to 
pay for the services of a person sometimes ill- 
qualified for the work, to be changed in a few 
weeks for another still less qualified. Let it be 
abolished! The city needs in this department a 
permanent body of men trained to the work. 

"The time will come, doubtless, when the Com- 
mon and Public Garden will be under the custody 
and care of trie Park Commissioners, aud that 
time may not be very distant. When the exten- 
sive system of parks now contemplated shall be 
laid out, it will be very much more convenient to 
have all the public pleasure grounds under the di- 
rection of one board of officers." 

It is worthy of note that among the names ap- 
pended to this report are those of ex- Alderman 
Hugh O'Brien and Alderman Clinton Viles of the 
last ana present Board, neither of whom can be 
charged with favoring the transfer of power to 
commissioners, excepting where such a transfer 



is absolutely demanded by great public exigen- 
cies. But the facts brought out by the investiga- 
tion showed them the need of change. 

The public exigency is the same today as then; 
it has not been removed* It should be distinct- 
ly understood, I think, that whatever there 
may have been deserving of criticism in the re- 
cent management of the Common is due to the 
system more than to the man who holds the posi- 
tion of City Forester. The system will inevitably 
lead to similar results, no matter who may fill the 
place, or be on the committee. The remedy for 
all these evils is evident. A commission composed 
of men of cultured tastes, qualified by experi- 
ence, free from outside influences, and un- 
hampered by fear of offending ward pol- 
iticians, devoting their time to a systematic 
supervision of the work of beautifying and 
caring for our public grounds upon a permanent 
plan, — this will give us the largest and best possi- 
ble results for the money expended and lat or per- 
formed. The transfer is not only in the interest 
of economy, but in the line of that civil-service 
reform which lifts all public service out of the 
realm of mere politics, and endeavors to conduct 
all public business upon the business principle of 
selecting men adapted to the work required of 
them, and freeing them from all obligations which 
hinder the faithful discharge of their duties. Those 
are my reasons for favoring this measure, ex- 
pressed as clearly, logically and succinctly as pos- 
sible. I could go on and give my experience in 
the Committee on Common and Squares, if time 
allowed. The Alderman suggests a matter which 
occurred to us in committee, and which I touched 
upon incidentally only because of my desire not 
to trespass upon'the time of the Board. The offi- 
cers who have charge of the Austin Farm will 
allow the use of it as a nursery for plants and 
trees which may be used on the city's grounds by 
the Park Commissioners. At present we neither 
know or provide for next year's wants until we 
come to the next year's business. The Committee 
on Common and Squares this year may not be in 
power next year. They find that they want 
certain plants or trees, and must go into 
the market and buy them at the best 
rate they can. Under this permanent commis- 
sion, composed as our commissions are of men 
who have one, two and three years to serve, there 
is a permanency which will be a very great meas- 
ure of economy. That can be readily seen by any 
one who has investigated this subject. I stand 
here as the Alderman does — and I do not question 
his honestv for a moment — to vote for the most 
economical legislation for the city of Boston, in 
order that the expenses may be reduced to a min- 
imum, and to prevent abuses. As soon as abuses 
are discovered, no matter who may be touched, I 
shall feel warranted in advocating a system that 
will remove them. 

Alderman Slade— I should be willing to wager 
the Alderman something that if the city of Boston 
attempts to raise its own trees and shrubs it will 
spend two dollars where it gets one dollar's worth. 
When you can show me a forester that has ever 
made much money out of the business, I should 
like to see him. It seems to me that the argu- 
ment of the Alderman, if carried out, would put 
the paving, sewer and all the other departments 
under a commission. I don't know why there is 
n't just as much reason for placing all the depart- 
ments in the hands of a commission as there is 
for this one. I cannot see much difference. If 
we go into this business, a few years will show it, 
and I think we shall miss it if they go into the 
business of raising shrubs ror the city". I call for 
the yeas and nays on the passage of the order. 

Alderman McLean — I am ordinarily in favor of 
commissions for such great departments, as the 
Police and Fire Departments and others: but I 
am not fully convinced that it is my duty to vote 
for a commission for this department, "i agree 
with the chairman of the Committee on Common 
and Squares, that abuses have grown up in this 
department. Now, here is a department that 
costs seventy thousand dollars a year, and we are 
asked to place it under a commission who now 
serve without salaries, which they will not be ex- 
pected to do long. This commission was organ- 
ized to lay out parks. It is barely possible that 
the committee aid n't know everything that took 
place last year, and therefore are not responsible 
for it. This appears to be one of the departments 
that does not partake of the same nature as the 
Police or Fire or Water Department, where there 
is such an immense amount of money at stake. 
Now, if it should happen that for one or two years 



sr> 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



there has been a bad administration of the pub 
lie grounds, it seems to me that it is not a matter 
of such risk as other departments. I am not 
ready to put the Street Department under a 
commission as, my iriend has suggested. Itmay 
lie that next year the Paving Department will be 
overrun with applicants lor position from the 
City Council, the samp, as I have no doubt, the 
Park Department was last year; but here is a de- 
partment where the expenditure was not large, 
audit it should happen that the grounds have 
not been skilfully cared for this year they may be 
better taken care ol next year. I should like to 
have a superintendent of Common and Public 
(Irounds put in th.it position so that he would not 
be subject to the votes of the City Council, and so 
that he would be removed from such an influence. 
I regret to have to vote against my Iriend the 
chairman of the Committee on Ordinances in this 
matter. 

Alderman Guild— I have given the subject a 
practical trial as a member or two committees on 
Common and Squares, and this is the result of 
that trial. 

Alderman Yiles— It is well known that 1 am not 
a great stickler for commissions; but l believe I 
shall vote for this order. I have taith in the com- 
mittee which has been appointed this year. And 
I believe that after the shaking up the depart- 
ment has had tor the past six mouths, the 
duties will be well performed this year. But in 
the absence of a minority- report from the Com- 
mittee on Common and Squares, I shall vote for 
the passage of this order. 

The order was passed — yeas 7, nays 4. 

Yeas— Aldermen Faunce, Guild, Hayden, steo- 
bins. Viles, Whidden, Whiton— 7. 

Nays— Aldermen Harris, McLean, Robinson, 
Slade— 4. 

Absent— Alderman Perkins. 

Subsequently a motion to reconsider by Alder- 
man Guild, hoping it would not prevail, was lost. 
Sent down. 

PAPERS I'KOM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Report of Committee on Finance with order for 
a transfer of $16,000 for purchase of additional 
land lor public park ; also passage ol an order for 
Park Commissioners to purchase such additional 
land on Hack l!ay. Orders passed in concurrence 
— yeas 11, nays 0. 

The order for the Mayor to petition the General 
Court for authority to enable the Board of Alder- 
men to fix the salaries of the officers attending 
the several courts of the couuty of Suffolk comes 
up referred to the Committee on Legislative Mat- 
ters. Concurred. 

Certificate of election of William Doogue as Su- 
perintendent of the Common, etc. Placed on tile. 

BOND APPROVED. 

The bond of George Coolidge, Superintendent of 
Printing, being presented duly certified, was ap 
proved. Sureties— F. W. Lincoln, J. W. Converse 

JAIL EXPENSES. 

A tequisition was received from the Sheriff of 
Suffolk County tor $1354.73 for expenses at the 
jail for February. Ordered paid. 

PERMIT FOB WOODED BUILDING. 

Alderman McLean submitted a report from the 
Committee on Survey and Insoection of Build- 
ings, with an order— That the Inspector of Build- 
ings be authorized to issue a permit to B. F. 
Sturtevant to erect on an unnamed place leading 
from Union avenue, Ward 23, a wooden building 
according to an application on file in the office of 
the Inspector of 'Buildings, upon condition that 
the foundation to the southeasterly side of the 
proposed building be constructed and carried 
down below the proposed level of the channel of 
Stony Brook. Order read twice and passed. Sent 
down. 

LICI N8ES. 

Alderman Guild submitted reports from the 
Committee on Licenses as follows : 

Minors' Applications Granted— Four bootblacks, 
twenty-eight newsboys. 

Amusement Licenses Granted— A. P. Peck, to 
give fancy dress ball at Music Hall on March 4; 
M. Mahony, to give athletic exhibition at Beetho- 
ven Hall, provided it is subject to the control of 
the police. 

Carriage Licenses Granted— Henry C. Turner & 
Co., southwest corner Washington street and 
Chester square. 

Wagon License Granted— A. G. Kain, 98 Hamp- 
den street. 



Junk Dealer Licensed— Frank Costa, 5S:; Shaw- 
rnut avenue. 
Severally accepted. 

HEREF0RD-STREE1 1 ^TENSION. 

Alderman Harris, from the Committee on 
Streets on the part of the Board, submitted orders 
to pay Caleb H. Warner and Charles F. Smith 
$11,362.50, and (',. T. W. Braman and H. D. Hyde, 
trustees, §7200, severally, for the proportion 
chargeable to widening streets for the land taken 
aud all damages occasioned by the extension of 
Hereford street from Commonwealth avenue to 
Boylston streei. Severally read twice and passed. 

Subsequently Alderman' Whidden offered an or- 
der—That the .Joint Committee ou Improved Sew- 
erage be, aud they hereby are, authorized to ex- 
pend from the appropriation for Improved Sewer- 
age, for their proportion of the cost of land taken 
ami damages occasioned by the extension of 
Hereford street from Commonwealth avenue to 
Boylston street, in which a portion of an inter- 
cepting sewer is to be constructed, the sum of 
fourteen thousand seven huudred and seventy- 
five dollars. Bead twice and passed. Sent down. 

n\ BR8EERS m I HE POOR. 

Alderman Han is submitted a report nomina- 
ting Alanson Bigelow, Henry L. Richards, Isaac 
T. Campbell and Henry W. Pickering to sen 
Overseers of the Poor for three years from the 
first Monday in April next. Report accepted and 
on motion of Alderman Harris a ballot was or- 
dered. Committee— Aldermen Harris and McLean. 
The nominees received eleven votes, the whole 
number cast, and they were declared elected. 
Sent down. 

si PERIN itmiims in BRIDGES. 

Alderman Harris submitted a report from the 
Committee on Bridges, nominating superintend- 
ents for bridges partly controlled by the city ol 
Boston : 

.lohu E. Pickell, Essex street Bridge. 

Alberto. Hawes, Granite Bridge. 

John Glavin, Xeponset Bridge. 

David S. Lawrence and Adam Bowlby, Chelsea 
Bridge. 

William Norton, Cambridge, North Harvard 
street, and Western-avenue Bridge to Cambridge. 

A. I). Henderson, North Beacon street and 
Western avenue to water town. 

The report was accepted and said nominations 
were confirmed. 

CN8PEC rORS OF PRISONS. 

Alderman Harris offered an order— That a spe- 
cial committee be appointed to inspect the pris 
and houses of detention within the county of Suf- 
folk, and to make the examinations and reports 
required by the statutes of the Commonwealth. 
Read twice and passed, and Aldermen Harris, 
Whiton and Faunce were appointed said commit- 
tee. 

PROJEC1 IM. SIGN. 
Alderman Viles submitted a report from the 
Committee on Police recommending that a per- 
mit be granted to . John Maguire to place a let- 
tered lamp in front of 638 Main street, Charles- 
town. Accepted. 

PERMITS FOB si xr.i.ES. 
Alderman Yiles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Health ou the part of the Board in 
favor of granting permits to occupy stables by 
Samuel G. Reed, Phillips street, Ward 22; Nasoh 
& Littlefield, 118, 120, 122 Medford street. Sever- 
ally accepted. 

COMPENSATION lOK LOSS OS FOWLS. 

Alderman Viles offered an order— That the City 
Treasurer be directed to pay Mrs. J. M. Ordway, 
living at No. •! Romsey street, Ward 24, the sum ot 
six dollars, in full compensation for the loss of six 
hens killed by dogs on ner premises; said sum to 
be charged to the receipts for Dog Licenses. Read 
twice and passed. 

PAVING UEPORT. 
Alderman Whidden submitted a report from 
the Committee on Paving, of leave to withdraw 
on petition of Mary Noonan for abatement of 
edgestone assessment of $36 against her estate on 
Boylston avenue, Ward 23. Accepted. 

HACK FARES AT OLD SOUTH BALL. 

Alderman Guild offered an order— That upon the 
occasion of the ball to be given at the Music Hall, 
on the 4th day of March next, in aid of the Old 
South Preservation Fund, the rates of fare to be 
paid for the use of hacks by persons returning 
from the ball shall be established as follows: 



FEBRUARY 25 



187 8 



86 



In the city proper, for each carriage with 
one passenger, $1.50; with two par-sengers, 
$2; with three or more passengers, 3. In 
going to the following-named portions of the 
city there shall lie paid for i he use of each car- 
riage ibf following rates, viz.: Ti> Koxliurv,#4; to 
Soii'h Boston, $3; to East Boston, $4 iiul tolls; to 
Charlestown, $3; to West Koxdury, Dor.hes'er 
ami Brighton, *6. Reail twice and pas-ed, alter 
an explanation that it was the usual order passed 



on such occasions to regulate the rates to be 
charged for puiilic hacks, and to secure the corn- 
tort uf parties reluming from the ball. 

EESIGNATION. 

Alderman McLean resigned his position on the 
committee to nominate Directors for East Bos- 
ton Ferries, and th.n Board voted to excuse him. 
Alderman VV bidden was appointed in his place. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Harris. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



87 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEBRUARY -Z&, 1878. 



Regular meeting at 7V 2 o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Pope, President, in the Chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Reference co Committee on Finance of a request 
of the School Board for an additional appropri- 
ation of $51,450. Concurred. 

Reference to Street Commissioners of a report 
and order for said commissioners to lay out as 
public streets the avenues leading to the ferry 
slips liom Commercial to Sumner street. Con- 
curred. 

Report and order for a permit to erect a wooden 
building in rear of I'nion avenue, to be issued to 
B. F. Sturtevant. Order read twice and passed in 
concurrence. 

Appointment of Alderman Whidden on Com- 
mittee to Nominate Ferry Directors, in place of 
Alderman McLean, declined. Placed on file. 

Order tor Committee on Improved Sewerage to 
expend $14,775 for land taken and damages oc- 
casioned by extensiou of Hereford street. Ordered 
to a second reading. 

Report and order allowing the directors of East 
Boston ferries to contract for fuel for the next 
financial year. Order passed to a second reading. 

SALE OF FERRY-BOAT GENERAL GRANT, AMD 
PURCHASE OF A NEW BOAT. 

Report and orders came down authorizing the 
sale of ferry boat General Grant, and purchase of 
a new one. 

The question was upon giving the orders a sec- 
ond reading. 

Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11— I hope -we shall have 
some explanation of the necessity of this new boat 
and the probable cost. If it is a proper order I 
shall be willing to vote for it. Some time last 
year there ..as read a letter in this chamber from 
a director of the ferries, Mr. Kelly, in which he 
said— 

"lam confident we can accommodate double 
the number of teams and five times as many foot 
travel." 

If that is so I think we ought to have some ne- 
cessity for the purchase of a new boat. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24—1 hope we shall get a 
little more information. I should like to know 
how old this General Grant is, and in what condi- 
tion she is. I notice by the report of the Board of 
Aldermen that the new boat is wanted for a re- 
serve boat. I think this General Grant is a re- 
serve boat, and is lying there not in use. Before 
we pass the order I should like to have a little 
more information. I should like to know how old 
the boat is, and in what condition she is, and what 
she cost. I think the cost of this new boat is 
somewhere about 840,000. I suppose the General 
Grant cost very nearly that, if not more; but 
when she came to be sbld, I suppose she would 
bring about 83000. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2—1 wish to state tor the in- 
formation of the gentlemen, that the reason for 
selling the boat is not because the General Grant 
is worthless, but this boat was originally built for 
a ferry in New York, to run from New York to 
Jersey City— a long route. She is a great deal 
longer than the boats used on the East Boston 
ferries. But the greatest objection is that the 
boat cannot make running time. She interferes 
with the running time of the other boats, which 
is about 7*2 minutes. Besides that, the route 
being so short and circling, the boat^s a little 
giddy, and in fact not at all adapted for that short 
route. She is in very good condition, and where 
a boat could be sold she will bring a pretty fair 
price foi a boat or that kind. I understand that 
she has cost about §30,000 for repairs during the 
time that the old ferry company had her and since 
the city of Boston bought her. In fact, all the 
boats today are in pretty good condition ; but I 
understand from the directors, and this question 
was talked in committee, that at certain seasons 
of the year they require extra boats, especially on 
those days when the large steamers come in from 
Europe; and. the directors don't think it best to 
trust to such an unwieldy boat as the General 
Grant is. There are some other questions which 



one of the directors, who is a member of this 
Council, might answer. 

Mr. Pearl of Ward 1 — The statement of the 
chairman of the committee is correct; and there 
is one other item— the General Grant is a very 
expensive boat. As a matter of economy the di- 
rectors thought she had better be sold. She is 
thirty feet longer than the other boats, and can- 
not make time well enough, as it takes a great 
deal of time to load and unload teams. She is 
very heavy and cranky in bad weather, and in- 
jures the slips very much going in. It was the 
opinion of all the directors, as a matter of econ- 
omy, that they should have a new boat, and that 
they should sell the old one. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11—1 should like to ask if it 
was the unanimous report of this committee that 
this purchase should be made. 

Mr. Pearl — It was a unanimous request from 
the directors, and I think it was a unarimous re- 
port from the committee. 

Mr. Burke— I would say now, that in my own 
opinion, the statement of' Mr. Kelly was perfectly 
correct. I know that the boats running today can 
accommodate five times the amount of travel. 
It is for the City Council to judge of this matter. 
I suppose that the directors, like any other board, 
are making provision for any emergency, and I 
suppose the City Council will use their own judg- 
ment about it. 

Mr. Pearl — We have six boats — four good boats. 
The Daniel Webster is twenty years old, and she 
does well for a small boat. But when it is neces- 
sary to use five boats, the Grant is not a proper 
boat to use, especially in bad weather. And she 
is a very expensive boat. 

Mr. Barnard — I have n't yet had my question 
answered. I should like to know, if I can, how 
old this boat is, and in what condition she is, how 
much she has been used, and how long she has 
been lying idle. I don't know whether she was 
bought under the direction ot the committee; I 
should hardly suppose she was; but it seems to 
me the experience tbey have had so far has been 
rather costly. And they say she is an expensive 
steamer to run, and we had better sell her: and 
from the way the other boats have sold, it seems 
to me the city would lose quite an amount. 

Mr. Pearl — In regard to ner age, it I am right in 
my information, I think she was a gunboat during 
the war, and she had a new top put on her and 
was bought by the old terry company some eight 
oi ten years ago, and I am informed that she is 
about twenty years old. She has cost the city of 
Boston and the ferry company about .550,000 up to 
the present time, and is never used except in case 
of emergency, and she does more damage than 
she is worth in crossing the harbor. 

Mr. Mowry of Ward 11— I should like to ask the 
chairman of the committee on the part of the 
Council if this was a unanimous report of the 
committee. 

Mr. Burke— I would answer yes, it was. 

The orders were passed to a second reading and 
laid over. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

A report came down with certificate of election 
of Overseers of the Poor. 

The report was accepted in concurrence. On 
motion of Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19. an election 
was ordered. Committtee— Messrs. Barnard of 
Ward 24, Flvnn ot Ward 16 and McGahey of 
Ward 7. 

Whole number of votes 60 

Necessary for a choice 31 

Alansoi) Bigelow 60 

Hfnry L. Richards 60 

Isaac'T. Campbell 58 

Henry W. Pickering 58 

Oscar Hosmer 1 

William Dodge 1 

George H. Gordon 1 

S . Smalley 1 

And Messrs. Bigelow, Richards, Campbell and 
Pickering were elected in concurrence. 

MANAGEMENT OF COMMON AND PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

An order came down to report an ordinance 
to place the Common and public grounds under 
the Park Commissioners. 

The order was declared passed to a second read- 
ing. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 doubted the vote, 
and the Council were divided--30 for, 31 against. 

Mr. Perham moved that the vote be taken bv 
yeas and nays. 

Mr. Spenceley— I rise to a point of order, that 
the vote has been declared. 



H8 



COMMON COUNCIL 



The President— The Chair thinks the motion not 
in order. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 would ask if the 
vote of Mr. M. W. Richardson of Ward 11 was 
counted. He was out of his plaee when the vote 
was taken. 

Mr. Spenceley— I rise to a point of order, that 
no business is before the meeting. Suppose the 
gentleman was iu New York; he ought to have 
been in his place. 

The President — The Messenger Informs me that 
the vote of Mr. Richardson was counted, although 
he was out ot his seat. It is fair to say that the 
Messenger informed me of that before* the vote 
was announced. 

The subject was again considered later in the 
session. 

Appointment on Committee— The President an- 
nounced that Mr. Coe declined to serve upon the 
special committee to investigate the expediency 
of purchasing the Mercantile-wharf property, and 
that he had appointed Mr. Mowry of Ward n in 
Mr. Coe's place. 

90HOOLHO! ses. 

Request was received from the School Commit- 
tee for the City Council to erect a sis-room pri- 
mary school building on the lot of land uow owned 
by the city Polk street, in the Charlestown District. 
Referred .to Committee ou Public instruction. 
Sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

A petition was received from Dr. .1. <:. Harring- 
ton to be compensated for injuries to horse and 
sleigh by reason of alleged defect in Tyler street. 
Referred to Committee on claims. Sent up, 

By Mr. Mullane of Ward 12— Petition of Edward 
J.Jenkins et nl., for additional ward accommo- 
dations in Ward 12. Referred to Committee on 
Public Buildings. Sent up. 

By Mr. Colby ot Ward 18— Petition of George M. 
King to be paid for the loss of a horse. Referred 
to Committee on Claims. Sent up. 

By Mr. Whichei of Ward 20— Petition oi A. 1). 
Williams et al.. that the limits within wnich 
wooden buildings en a he constructed be defined. 
Referred to Committee on Survey and Inspection 
of Buildings. Sent up. 

EtEPOBT or THE INSPECTOR OF 111 [LDINQS, 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward H presented the annual 
report of the Inspector of Buildings. (City Doc. 
94,) which was accepted and sent up. 

The number of permits that have been issued 
for the erection of new buildings, for alterations 
and additions, for steam engines, boilers, fur- 
naces, etc., and especially in the work of unsafe 
buildings and fire escapes, has been in excels of 
that of the previous year. As has been the cus- 
tom of the department from the time ot its estab- 
lishment, especial attention has been given 
in the matter of the inspection of the erec- 
tion of all new buildings, carefully noting im- 
? roper methods of construction and deviations 
rom prescribed building regulations. The sharp 
competition, however, among builders has re- 
duced profits to an exceptionally small margin, re- 
sulting in a tendency, in many cases, to secure 
them from out of the material and workmanship, 
lather than from the amount of the contract. 

In the matter of securing ample means of 
-egress and fire escapes on certain classes ol build- 
ings, required by law to be provided with them, 
and which, upon inspection, appeared to be de- 
ficient in these respects, has the attention of the 
■department during the year been more particular- 
ly directed, its first object being to secure a 
proper compliance with the requisitions that had 
been issued during the latter part of the previous 
year upon our public buildings; and second, to 
ascertain by au inspection of the buildings in the 
city the location or our tenement, boarding and 
lodging houses, hotels, charitable Institutions, 
etc., the number of their inmates, the condition 
of the buildings, tneir danger from tire, and the 
facilities for egress maintained therein in case of 
fire or accident. 

To secure information on this subject, that in 
all respects would be accurate and complete, it 
was apparent that the system of inspection 
should provide against omissions, and the plan of 
numbering and inspecting by blocks, instead of 
streets, was adopted. The work of this examina- 
tion is progressing in a manner that is answering 
the end for which it was instituted. The condi- 
tion of each ot the above classes of buildings 
being fully noted, a plan of the premises drawn, 
and, upon completion, the reports will be bound 



together into volumes, affording information that 
heretofore has not been accessible. 

The work of securing unsafe buildings, unsafe 
walls, etc., has been unusually exacting, havinti 
been much larger than during any previous year, 
obliging the department in several cases, through 
the delinquencies of the owners, to enter upon, 
take down, or secure them, to the extent the safe- 
ty of the public required. 

There is generally great sensitiveness on the 
part of owners to have the unsafe condition of 
their buildings made a matter of public commeut, 
and this feeling has been respected when a dispo- 
sition on their part has been manifested to take 
immediate measures to secure them. 

The number of i erunts that have been issued 
during the year for brick, stone and iron build- 
ings, 205; permits issued for wood and frame 
buildings, 532; permits issued to erect sheds sit- 
uate upon wharves within the building limits of 
the City, 13: buildings for which permits lu.ve 
been issued to have additions built to them, or to 
have alterations and repairs made upon them, 
234.".; steam engines and steam boilers for which 
permits have been issued to set, 154; ovens for 
which permits have been issued to build, 21; kilns 
for which permits have been issued to build, 1: 
furnaces, 42; stills, retorts, etc., 13; notices re- 
ceived of intention to put in heating apparatus, 
481: street signs, lanterns and transparencies 
examined, 21; public halls examined with 
reference to granting a license to occupy the 
same, 4; buildings upon which detailed reports 
have been made with reference to tire- 
escapes and means of egress, 2869; buildings ex- 
amined that were damaged by tire, 349; hoistways 
examined, 110; permits issued to occupy streets 
for building purposes, 1239; buildings, walls, etc., 
reported to be in au unsafe condition, 220; chim- 
neys reported unsafe, 388: detective Hues, 189; 
unsafe heating apparatus. 126 : buildings reportea 
as being deficient in means of egress and fire es- 
capes, 144; violations reported, 833: cases referred 
to the City Solicitor, 9; brick buildings completed 
during the year. 191: wooden and frame build- 
ings completed, .">0ii: buildings upon which com- 
pleted alterations have been made, and to 
which additions have been built, and upon 
which repairs have been made, 2166; steam 
engines set and furnaces and ovens built, 266; 
heating apparatus set, 505, estimated cost of com- 
pleted brick buildings, §4,283,775; estimated cost 
of completed wood and frame buildings, $1,048,590: 
estimated cost ol completed additions, alterations 
and repairs, $1,114,290; estimated cost of steam 
engines, steam boilers and the building of ovens, 
furnaces, etc., $137,115; estimated cost of heating 
apparatus set, $68,730; estimated cost of securing 
unsafe buildings, unsafe walls, unsafe founda- 
tions, etc., $18,816; estimated cost of protecting 
hoistway openings, $3750; estimated cost of se- 
curing dangerous chimneys, $5019; number ot ex- 
aminations that have been made, 22,316; number 
of notices issued, 989. 

The number of permits that have oeen issued 
dining the year by the Police Department and by 
the Inspectors ol Buildings is as follows. 

Permits in force -Ian. 1, 1877 109 

Permits issued during the year 1,130 

Total 1.239 

Permits cancelled during the year 680 

Permits revoked durine the vear 8 

Permits in force Dec. 31, 1877 55G 

Total 1,239 

Prosecutions for violations of conditions of per- 
mit 1 

The number of buildings that have been ex- 
amined with reference to means of egress and fire 
escapes is 12,741. The whole uumber of buildings 
upon which detailed reports have been made is 
2809. , 

The number of violatio s that have been inves- 
tigated and reported ou U 833. 

This number does not include numerous viola- 
tions that were removed on verbal notification. 
but those only that from any cause it became nec- 
essary to take official action. 

The total number of brick and stone buildings 
completed during the year is 191, at an estimated 
cost of $4,283,775. 

These buildings contain 42 stores, and are con- 
structed to accommodate 271 families. 

The total number of wooden and frame build- 
ings completed is 506, at an estimated cost of 
$1,048,590. These buildings contain 29 stores, and 
are constructed to accommodate 390 families. 



FEBRUARY 28, 1878 



89 



The total number of buildings upon which com- 
pleted alterations have been made is 2165, at an 
estimated cost of §1,114,290. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 11 submitted a report 
from the Committee on Assessors' Department, 
that it is inexpedient to give the principal As- 
sessors the power of appointing the Second As- 
sistant Assessors, and the order to report an 
ordinauce to that effect ought not to pass. The 
report was accepted, and the question on giving 
the order a second reading was declared refused. 
Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 doubted the vote, 
and on his motion the yeas and nays were or- 
dered. 

The order was refused a second . reading— yeas 
28; nays 36: 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Colby, 
Crocker, Danforth, Day, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, 
Mowry, Nasou, Perham, Pierce, Plimpton, J. B. 
Richardson, Roberts, Rust, E. H. Sampson, H. N. 
Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, Smith, Spenceley, 
Thompson, Toppan, Webster, Wolcott— 28. 

jj a ys — viessrs. Barry, B. Brintnall, N. Y. Brint- 
nall, Burke, Cannon, Devlin, Doherty, Drynan, 
Fernald, Flynn, Howland, Kelley, Kendricken, 
Kidney, Lauten, Lovering, McDonald, McGahey, 
McGaragle, McGeough, Mnllane, Mullen, O'Con- 
nor, Pearl, M. W. Richardson, Roach, Rosnosky, 
O. H. Sampson, Sibley. J. Taylor, Thorndike, 
Ward, Whicher, Wilson, Woolley, Wyman— 36. 

Absent or not voting— Brawley, Coe, Cox, Den- 
ny, Hollis, Santry, J. F. Taylor— 7. 
Sent up. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 11 submitted a report 
from the Committee on Assessors' Department 
recommending the election of the following- 
named persons to be Second Assistant Assessors: 
Ward 1— Isaiah Whitten. 
Ward 2— Albert H. Taylor. 
Ward 3— John Bryant. 
Ward 4— D. D. Taylor. 
Ward 5— Dennis G. Quirk. 
Ward 6— John Carviu, Michael D. Collins. 
Ward 7— Edward J. Riley. 
Ward 8— Thomas J. Anderson. 
Ward y— Walter Harmon. 

Ward 10— William S. Whitney, Increase E. 
Noyes. 
Ward 11— John R. Briggs, Jarvis D. Braman. 
Ward 12— John Osborne, Jr., Alfred I. Wood- 
bury. 
Ward 13— Dudley Pray. 
Ward 14— Hosea B. Bowen. 
Ward 15— Daniel J. Holland. 
Ward 16— W. W. Dromey. 
Ward 17— Dudley R. Child. 
Ward 18— Samuel P. Oliver. 
Ward 19— Francis E. Hines. 
Ward 20— Frederick H. Field, Edward W. Dolan. 
Ward 21— John C. Cook, George Warren. 
Ward 22— Patrick H. Rogers. 
Ward 23— Edward P. Butler, John F. Payson. 
Ward 24— William Withington, Joseph E. Hall. 
Ward 25— George W. Warren. 
Mr. Richardson of Ward 11— I would state to the 
Council that Mr. Braman, whom the committee 
nominated from Ward 11, declines to serve, and I 
would suggest, after conferring with other mem- 
bers of the committee, the name of Mr. James 
Standish in place of Mr. Braman. 

The report was accepted and the nominations 
were laid over. 

Subsequently Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 moved 
to suspend the rule, in order to proceed to the 
election of Second Assistant Assessors. 

Mr. Mullen— I hope this motion will not prevail. 
I desire to look over the list of those gentlemen 
on the paper I find on my desk, for the purpose of 
picking out what I consider the best men 
for the nosition. I don't think the gentle- 
men on the ticket are going to suffer by leaving 
this matter over one week. I think, it is the usual 
course in this Council. I hope the motion will 
not prevail and not ballot tonight, from the 
fact that some gentlemen think the nomina- 
tions are not satisfactory, and I think in many 
cases they are not competent. Therefore I wish a 
little time for myself to look the matter over care- 
fully. 

The Council refused to suspend the rule, by a 
division— 26 for, 28 against. 

FIRE ESCAPES FOR HIGH SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11 submitted a repoit from 
the Committee on Public Instruction, to whom 
was referred the request of the School Committee 
that suitable tire escapes be provided on the 



* 



buildings occupied by the Eatin and English High 
schools in Bedford street, recommending that 
such tire escapes be provided at once, and that 
the request be referred to the Committee on Pub- 
t lie Buildings. Report accepted and referred ac- 
cordingly. Sent up. 

CLAIMS. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 submitted reports of 
leave to withdraw, from the Committee on 
Claims, on petitions of Benjamin H. Stimson, to 
be paid for labor and materials furnished the 
steamer Henry Morrison; of Ann Morris, to be 
compensated for personal injuries caused by an 
alleged defect in Cambridge street, Charlestown; 
William W. Wallace, to be compensated for per- 
sonal injuries received by a city team ; of Thomas 
Brown, <,o be compensated for personal injuries 
caused by snow falling from the roof oc the 
Charity Bureau on Chardon street. Severally ac- 
cepted. Sent up. 

BILLS ALLOWED. 

Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11 offered the following : 
Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts allow 
for payment the bill of Hall & Whipple, for $2.30, 
for refreshments furnished the Committee on 
Licenses of 1877, the same not having been pre- 
sented at his office within three months of the 
date of contracting the same, as required by the 
22d joint rule of the City Council. 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be au- 
thorized to audit and allow for payment the fol- 
lowing-named bills, which were incurred by spe- 
cial committees of the City Council of 1877, ap- 
proved by said committees, but not paid, in conse- 
quence of the appropriations to meet the same 
having been exhausted, viz.: 

The Heliotype Printing Company, for map of 

Army and Navy Procession $115.88 

F. L. Gilman & Co.. for balance due on the two 
historic, monuments at South Boston and 

Boston Highlands 60.00 

George J. Coyle, for loam delivered at the mon- 
ument, Fort avenue, Boston Highlands 34.50 

Said amounts to be charged to the appropria- 
tions for Incidentals. 
Severally ordered to a second reading. 

COMMON AND PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

Mr. ThoniDSon of Ward 9—1 move that the vote 
whereby the" order in regard to putting the De- 
partment on Common and Public Grounds in the 
hands of the Park Commissioners was refused a 
second reading be reconsidered. I hope it may be 
reconsidered, and that we may have a different 
disposition of the matter. It is a matter of great 
importance; I think that the public are much in- 
terested and that public opinion is much the 
other way. The committee having the depart- 
ment in charge have shown a disposition to test 
the new system, and I think that out of compli- 
ment to them we might join in their recommenda- 
tion. I call for the yeas and nays. 

Mr. Danforth of Ward 10— Some of the reasons 
for reconsidering that voie 1 should like to say. 
Since you have done me the honor to put me upon 
that committee, I have investigated the manner 
in which the Common and public grounds have 
been carried on. It is evident that there has been 
no system, and an entire lack of system. I have 
investigated the bills and pay-rolls in the Audit- 
or's office, and find the system of employment of 
labor very bad; and I find that the committee 
have voted that in no case shall over 145 men be 
employed, and yet some months there were eigh- 
teen and twenty more than that. There is no sys- 
tem in making up the pay rolls. I find that in 
purchasing the plants, to conduct the matter eco- 
nomically there should be a permanent system. I 
find there have been furnished by one firm fifty- 
thousand plants, on which, if the committee knew 
they were going to need them next year, there 
could be at least twenty-five hundred dollars 
saved, on those plants. I find that from convers- 
ing with gentlemen who have places in the coun- 
try that compare favorably with the Public Gar- 
den, I find that the labor at Forest Hills amounts 
to forty-five thousand dollars. It is a place of 177 
acres. On the Public Garden it is thirty-seven 
thousand dollars. On Forest Hills there is a large 
amount of walks and plants set out,— 125,000 
plants, and the city of Boston has (10,000 
on the Public Garden. Everything about 
the department is on that plan. It re- 
quires a permanent system to carry on the 
public grounds of Boston, and until" there is 
a committee or a commission that will hold on 
from year to year it can never be amply provided 
for. The laborers employed on the public grounds 



90 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



last year averaged twelve days. If you take from 
thrm the men tbat had to be employed by the 
month, the other men will not average seven or 
eight days. Any gentleman knows that no garden 
can be carried on in that way. The committee 
have come to the conclusion that they are not 
competent, and that no committee is competent, 
to carry on the garden, with a prospect of being 
changed every year. This year there is only one 
on the committee who was on last year, anil last 
year there was only oue who was on the year be- 
fore. No committee knows what is to be done 
next year. I hope the vote will be reconsidered, 
and that we shall pass the order. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3—1 hope this reconsider- 
ation will not prevail. 1 believe in commissions 
to a limited extent. The larger departments 
of the Government, like the Police, Fire 
Department, and some others, I am entirely 
in favor of placing them under commis- 
sions. But the argument in favor of a com- 
mission for this department is equally good in 
favor of a commission for the Paving Depart- 
ment, sewers and halt a dozen other departments. 
If the rule that the committee in this department 
is to be done away with and a commission should 
be established iu a department as unimportant as 
this, comparatively speaking, because the ex- 
penditure is smaller than that of many others, 
and the evil effects of the looseness of the system 
is very little compared to any other departments, 
if we are prepared to accept a new charter and do 
away with committee work, let us meet the issue 
direct. It seems to me that the issue in this mat- 
ter has been dodged. An order which I had the 
honor to offer was passed last year for an investi- 
gation in regard to the management of the Com- 
mittee on Common and Squares, and tbat report, 
I think I can safely say, was very unsatisfactory, 
and 1 don't think it satisfied the committee them- 
selves. The great question we all wanted to rind 
out was whether John Galvin tilled the bill, 
whether he was a good superintendent and worthy 
of our confidence, and whether there should 
be a new man put in his place. What did the 
committee do? They ignored that question en- 
tirely; they brought" iu a report that the system 
was 'wrong and that the committee were some- 
what censurable, and that the department should 
be transferred to the Park Commissioners. In- 
stead of giving us a report, as we all wanted, 
either exonerating or blaming the Superintend- 
ent, instead of giving what was the common end 
and aim of the investigation, tbey con- 
demned the system. Even Alderman Guild 
says in the Board of Aldermen that the fault is 
not with the man but with the system, and he says 
substantially that any man would do about the 
same. Now, before we admit that the fault is en- 
tirely with the system and not with the man, it 
would be my idea to try some new man. The 
Council have elected a new man, who, although 
not my first choice, 1 am informed is a good 
man. Now, if Mr. Galvin is a good man 
for the place, let us elect him, and if not let as 
elect another, and meet the question squarely 
upon its merits. Let those who are in favor of 
Mr. Galvin vote for him, and those not in favor of 
him vote against him. and put in a new man; and 
if at the end of another year we find we cannot 
get a committee and a superintendent suitable to 
carry on the department, possibly I should be 
prepared to vote for a commission. But I am 
not prepared to do so now, and I think that many 
are not prepared to vote for unlimited commis- 
sions. This department spends something like 
§100,000. There are departments spending nearly 
a million, employing a great deal of labor. Take 
the Committee on Paving and Sewers, for in- 
stance. If we get a Committee on Sewers who are 
not practical mechanics, they know as much about 
such building as this committee know about 
planting trees; but still, it they are men of good 
judgment, and have a good superintendent, they 
get along very well. For thi9 reason, I see no 
reason for a change in this department. The fact 
that Mr. Galvin is popular with some and not pop- 
ular with others is not a reason for changing the 
system. I say we ought to meet the question 
squarely: then if the question comes up <>i having 
commissions for all the departments, let us meet 
it. I think the question, whether we need a new 
head for the department, should be settled upon 
its merits; and an attemot to skilfully ignore one 
question and slide off on to another is not what, 
according to my idea, of what ought to be done : 
and until the question of change in the head is 
settled, 1 should vote against a commission. 



Mr. Danforth of Ward 10 —It isn't a question 
of men, it is a criticism upon the system. I will 
state only one case. This present committee, or 
any committee, or the present Superintendent, 
has no 'authority to contract for plants for next 
year. He is obliged to get them where he can. 
Now, there were ten to eleven thousand of one 
kind of plants bought last year, at fifteen cents 
apiece; and if any committee had been author- 
ized to contract for next year's supply, 
it they were going to hold over next 
year, those plants could be bought for 
six or seven cents apiece : they could be 
contracted for; anybody would be" glad to grow 
those plants for six to sever cents apiece. That 
is only oue thing. It will apply to many other 
plants in the same direction. Supposing Mr. 
Hunnewell's place and Mr. Paysou's place 
changed every year; suppose it had' a new owner 
every year, and a new policy. It is n't a question 
of men. Everything has to be done new in the 
spring; everything has to be wasted in the tall 
and everything has to be bought by a new com- 
mittee in the spring. Then the labor'costs a great 
deal more than it otherwise would. Here is the 
place, spoken ol last year, that the city talked 
about taking— Horatio Harris's— which had been 
carried on three or four years before he died for 
§1600. It has twenty-eight acres, and the gar- 
dener who had the contract supplied everything. 
The Common and public grounds can be carried 
on under a commission, or permanent committee 
—call it what you will— for about half of what has 
been spent upon it. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5— As a member of the Com- 
mittee on Common and Public Grounds, I don't 
desire to shirk from any duty I am capable of 
performing on that committee. This committee 
had two sessions, and this question was before it. 
There don't seem to be but one gentleman on the 
committee posted on flowers, and how things 
should be. My friend from Ward 10 seems to 
understand it. 1 don't. My only point seemed 
to be to go into the market for what we should 
buy, and find what we wanted, and do with it as 
we should with any other property or goods 
that we should buy.' The committee seemed to 
be divided on this question, and seemed to be 
somewhat distrustful that they could no tinan- 
age the public grounds satisfactory to the peo- 
ple. There is a wide difference in people. Some 
people want it as nice as money can make it; 
others think there is too much money, a piece of 
extravagance; that the system is wrong; that the 
heln has been bad and paid too much for it. But 
all "those things are passed and gone, and it has 
nothing to do with the present. As one of the 
committee, not being well posted in this matter, I 
did not vote to transfer it to the Park Com- 
missioners. I was told that they were 
willing to take it as a labor of love: 
that they were men of ability, culture and 
taste, and willing to take it as a labor of love; and 
as the feeling existed in the committee. I voted in 
favor of this report, and 1 think, under the pres- 
ent circumstances, there can be no harm in try- 
ing it. If we don't like it, an order from the City 
Council can take it from their bands. I think 
they can do as well as the committee, although, 
as I said before, I don't wish to shirk any respon- 
sibility. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 'J— The circumstances 
in regard to this department aie somewhat pecu- 
liar. The fact is that by the act of the Legisla- 
ture the Park Conunisioners have charge, at pres- 
ent, of a portion of the public grounds of the city 
of Boston,— a portion that will become more im- 
portant every year. The question is whether 
we shall keep up the expense of two depart- 
ments or consolidate them and get the advan- 
tage of men having the best judgment, like 
those who compose the present Park Com- 
mission. One of the members is President 
of the Horticultural Society; his taste is cultivated 
in tbat direction, and to him it would be a work 
of love in taking care of the Public Garden. 
Simply as showing public opinion in this matter, I 
want to read a letter from Mr. Doogue, written to 
a member of the Council — not to me ; and referring 
to something he said before, he says- 
Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 rise to a point of 
order. I would ask who it is addressed to .' 

Mr. Thompson — I don't care to state. 

Mr. McGaragle— 1 object. 

The President— The gentleman can read such 
portions as he chooses and incorporate them in 
his speech. 



FEBRUARY 28, 1878, 



91 



Mr. Thompson— Referring to what he said be- 
fore, Mr. Doogue says — 

"I am desirous of seeing; it transferred to the 
Park Commissioners. It will then be out of the 
reach of politicians who make politics a trade." 

There is the man whom you have said by your 
votes is qualified by experience for the position 
of Superintendent of Public Grounds. He says 
the place for it is in the hands of the Park Com- 
missioners ; ard I don't think we can do better 
than take the advice of those gentlemen who are 
well qualified to judge. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19—1 would like to ask 
the gentleman if Mr. Doogue has learned this 
from his experience in the last two or three 
weeks. 

The yeas and nays were ordered, and the motion 
to reconsider was rejected— yeas 29, nays 37. 

Yeas — Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Colby, 
Crocker, Danf orth, Ham, Hibbard, Hill, Howland, 
Mowry, Nason, Perham, Pierce, Plimpton, M. W. 
Richardson, Roberts, Rust, E. H. Sampson, O. 
H.Sampson, H. N. Sawyer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, 
Sibley, Smith, Thompson, Ward, Wolcott, Wy- 
nian—29. 

Nays— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, N. 
Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Day, Devlin, Doher- 
ty, Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, Kelley, Kendricken, 
Kidney, Eauten, Lovering, McDonald, McGabey. 
McGaragle, McGeough, Mullane, Mullen, O'Con- 
nor, Pearl, J. B. Richardson, Roach, Rosnosky, 
Santry, Spenceley, J. Taylor, Thorndike, Toppan, 
Webster, Whicher, Wilson, Woolley— 37. 

Absent or not voting— Coe, Cox, Dennv, Hol- 
lis, J. F. Taylor— 5. 

POLICE BELTS. 

Mr. Brintnall of Ward 5 offered an order— That 
the Committee on Police on the pare ot this Corn- 
ell consider the expediency of the police force be- 
ing allowed to dispense with the wearing of belts 
as now required by his Honor the Mayor and 
Board of Aldermen. 

Mr. Brintnall of Ward 5 moved to refer the or- 
der to the Committee on Police of this branch. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 — I raise the point of 
order that the Committee on Police have no right 
to consider this matter; it is entirely outside of 
their duties. 

Mr. Brintnall ot Ward 5 — The gentleman who 
requested that that order be offered thought it 
might do some good for the committee to take ac- 
tion upon it. That committee don't have much 
duty to perform. 

The President— The Chair thinks the committee 
have no power in this matter; yet the Council can 
refer it to the Committee on Police to consider 
the matter. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3—1 think this is like the 
Committee on Common and Squares. It is too 
large to be handled by a committee, and there 
ought to be a commission appointed. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 understood that 
the gentleman offering the order moved to refer 
it to the Committee on Police, and I hope it will 
be carried. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24—1 should like to offer 
an amendment to that order by inserting the 
words "and the rest of their uniforms." If they 
are going to dispense with a part of it, 1 think 
they had better dispense with the whole of it. 

Mr. Brown of Ward 23—1 will make a motion 
that the whole subject be indefinitely postponed. 

The President — The Chair thinks that motion 
will not be in order. The question is upon the "" 
reference. The Chair would also state that the 
amendment of the gentleman from Ward 24 would 
not be in order. 

The order was referred to the Committee on 
Police of the Common Council. 

PAY OF LABORERS. 

Mr. Brintnall of Ward 5 offered an order — That 
the Auditor be authorized to make up the pay roll 
of all the laborers employed by the city every two 
weeks during the year, and the Treasurer request- 
ed to pay the same. 

Mr. Brintnall of Ward 5— If this order is passed, 
it will be quite a benefit to the laborers employed 
by the city. Their pay has been cut down from 
$1.75 to $1.50 a day, and it would assist theui very 
much to have their pay every two weeks. The 
only objection I have heard is the extra work in 
making up the pay rolls. Taking everything into 
consideration, I don't think it will do any harm, 
even if it requires an extra clerk. If a man gets 
small pay, a month is a long time to wait for it. 

Mr. Wolcott of Ward 11— I move that this order 
be referred to the Committee on Accounts. A 



similar order was put in last year, and reported 
on adversely by that committee. There were 
reasons stated strongly enough to justify them in 
making such a report. Those reasons may or 
may not exist this year. I think that the proper 
reference to be made. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8 — While I am certain- 
ly in favor of paying the laborers every two weeks, 
I don't know what the Auditor has to do with it. 
It should go to the joint committees, and there- 
fore I move it be indefinitely postponed, as it will 
do no good at all. 

Mr. Brintnall — I understood that the Treasurer 
paid those pay rolls from the Auditor's report. 

The order was referred to the Committee on 
Accounts. Sent up. 

REWARD OFFERED. 

Mr. Devlin of Ward 13 offered an order— That 
his Honor the Mayor be authorized to offer a re- 
ward in the sum of $500 for the detection, arrest 
and conviction of the party or parties who mur- 
dered James H. Daley in South Boston on the 
night of Feb. 4, 1878; said sum, if paid, to be 
charged to the appropriation for Incidental Ex- 
penses. 

The order was passed to a second reading. 

Subsequently, on motion of Mr. Devlin, the rule 
was suspended and the order was read a second 
time and passed. Sent up. 

NEW WARDROOM FOR WARD TWENTY-TWO. 

Mr. Barry of Ward 22 off ered an order — That the 
Committee on Public Buildings consider and re- 
port upon the expediency of providing a suitable 
wardroom for Ward 22. Referred, on motion of 
Mr. Barry, to the Joint Committee on Public 
Buildings. Sent up. 

CHARLES RIVER EMBANKMENTS. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9 mo^ed to take from 
the table the order for the Mayor to petition for 
the cession to the city of the strip of flats on 
Charles River line trom southerly line of Canal 
Bridge to Harbor Commissioners' line near junc- 
tion of Brookline avenue and Beacon street. 

Mr. Thompson — This order was laid upon the 
table at the last meeting at the request of the 
gentleman from Ward 8, in order that there may 
be some discussion tonight. If the petition is 
passed at all, it should go to the Legislature very 
soon in order to aid an order put in there. If the 
order is taken from the table I will give my rea- 
sons. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— At the last meeting 
I asked to have the order laid upon the table, as I 
did n't know but there would be some expense. 
I will not oppose it. This order asks the Com- 
monwealth to cede to the city a line of flats back 
of Beacon street to Brookline avenue. While I 
have no earthly idea that the State will cede to 
the city that vast amount of property, I cannot 
see any good reason for having it at all, inasmuch 
as it is a part of the park scheme, I hope the or- 
der will prevail. 

The order was taken from the table and passed, 
in concurrence. 

TERM OF OFFTCE OF MEMBERS OF THE CITY GOV- 
ERNMENT. 

On motion of Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19, the or- 
der to petition for acts providing that the Mayor 
shall be elected for two years, and the Aldermen 
and Common Council tor* three years, and be paid 
salaries, was taken from the table. 

The question was upon giving the order a sec- 
ond reading. 

Mr. Hibbard of Ward 17—1 would move to 
amend by striking out the part providing that the 
Board of" Aldermen shall devote their whole time 
to the city, and the pares providing that the Al- 
dermen and Common Councilmen shall receive 
salaries. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— While I don't pro- 
pose to discuss this, and voted for taking it from 
Jhe table, it is so late in the year I don't think 
any good can come from it. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19—1 am not very stren- 
uous in carrying this matter through. This order 
was offered last year because I thought 
it would meet many of the arguments 
which have been given for the last tew 
days iu respect to commissions. Gentle- 
men tell us that committees appointed by theCiry 
Council cannot do their work well, because they 
are elected for only one year and are continually 
going out. Of course. I have asked some ques- 
tions in relation to this matter, and I do think 
that is one of the best orders that could be of- 
fered, and I think it is one of the best things that 



92 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



could be brought about. I think if any gentleman 
will go CO the Chief of Police and ask uiui if he 
could have a committee on three years' time, 
and he would say he would not have a 
commission on any account; and 1 think the 
Committee on Common and Squares would be of 
the same opinion. The great bugbear is the length 
Of time for which they are elected. I don't feel that 
I want to force it up. Last vear I offered the order 
and it was refused a second reading. Now I have 
taken it up and you may indefinitely postpone it 
or do anything you have a mind to. I think it 
would take the place of commissions, and I think 
we would have a much better Govern- 
ment than by appointing commissions. They 
say these gentlemen ought not to give 
their time for nothing. That is the plea 
for the Board of Park Commissioners; they give 
their time for notning. It will hold good to us :is 
to them. I hope the gentleman's amendment will 
be adopted, and I think this matter cau be sent up 
as well as the other. I thought it was too late to 
send anything to the Legislature, and I under- 
stand we have asked the Mayor to petition for an- 
other matter, and we can in this if in that. If we 
pass this order we can do away with commissions 
and save the city a great deal of money, and the 
Government will be more stable than at present, 
and carry out the plans of the city better than at 
present. 

.Mr. Hibbard-I certainly am in lavor of the mo- 
tion as now amended. My object in moving that 
amendment is, that if we elected the Aldermen 
for thrpe years, and paid them salaries, we shall 
be rilling the offices with broken-down merchants 
or retired men, which is just as bad. I feel, that 
we want practical business men for Aldermeri and 
Councilmen. The great reason for paying the 
Councilmen salaries, when this was introduced 
last year, was to avoid junketing. I have tilled 
all my engagements on committees this year, and 
two, months have expired, and none of the com- 
mittee I am on have been invited out to dinner at 
all. I don't think any member of the Council de- 
Bires a salary tor that purpose. 
. -Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I have no means of 
knowing what the sentiment of members of the 
Council is on this matter, as 1 haven't heard it 
discussed; and not being in favor of it, I cannot 
run the risk of letting it go to a vote without 
briefly stating my opinion in regard to it. I think 
it has been the good fortune ot Boston, to have 
had always, scarcely without exception, an up- 
right, honorable, honest, patriotic City Govern- 
ment, that will compare favorably with the city 
government, or the government of a city of 
equal population in this country or any other; and 
her councillors, her servants and those who have 
administered her affairs, I think, have generally 
done it with no reward except the happiness 
which results from a conscientiousness of a duty 
well done— the feeling of having advanced the 
great cause of popular rights and received the 
approbation of their fellow-men. And it does n't 
seem to me that any such change has come over 
the spirit of our people as that we should say that 
those feelings have ceased to actuate those 
living, or will cease to actuate those who 
may come after us. I do not think it will tend to 
the political purity of the affairs of this Ciry Gov- 
ernment to i reate eighty-four salaried offices to be 
tilled entirely by the popular vote. It seems to me 
it would be holding out so many more prizes for 
ward managers to scramble after, or to be consid- 
ered as gifts to those who, for the time being, 
perhaps, have no business or occupation, to be 
bestowed upon them by friends who take that 
means, perhaps, to support them, rather than any 
other. I think the giving of this pecuniar; in- 
ducement to accept an office would have a tenden- 
cy to lower the dignity of the office by lowering 
and debasing the motive by which men would be 
governed to get into them. I think it would be a 
very great evil if we should adopt any system 
by which, as I have stated, so many new 
offices would be tilled by the annual elec- 
tions. The feature of the order which proposes 
longer terms has some arguments for it, but we 
have sometimes been thankful for a source of 
consolation, and been relieved, when we have had 
bad administrators, that their terms were short. 
There are arguments for short terms as well a3 
long. After all, whether you have long terms or 
short terms, it comes back to the question of 
men and the character of the men you put in the 
office. If the men are patriotic and upright 
and wise, it would be wise to have as 
long terms as possible; and if you always 



select those kind of men you would be 
always safe. But if you do elect improper men 
for the office, it is an advautage that they do not 
have a long hold and tenure of it. In looking 
over the list of Aldermen, as I had occasion to do 
a day or two ago, for another purpose, in speak- 
ing of the advantage which is very often remark- 
ed here of short terms, you will find, Mr. 
President, one Alderman, since the city was 
organized under a charter, who served eleven 
years; one who served nine years; three who 
served six years; twenty-nine who served 
four years, and sixty-three who served three 
years each. A very large majority served two 
years, and a single term has been the exception if 
the officer, by that single term, had proved him- 
self worthy of the confidence of his fellow-citi- 
zens. In the Council also, where changes are 
made more frequently and regularly than in the 
Board of Aldermen generally, you will find sev- 
eral who served eight years each, one who served 
fifteen years, very many served four, five and six 
years each. Of the present City Council a ma- 
jority come with the weight of previous experi- 
ence and fitness ; and t think the instances are 
exceptions where the people have refused to 
return any man to his seat, either in 
this branch, or the other, who has proved 
himself worthy ol the honor and confidence of 
the citizens. 1 have not recently considered this 
subject, and, as I said at the beginning, I had no 
means of knowing what the sentiment of the 
Council is; but I should have considered it a mis- 
take to have passed it, and therefore I have ven- 
tured to trespass upon the time of the Council to 
briefly state one or two of the reasons which 
seem to me to be of weight against it. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24—1 move that the sub- 
ject be specially assigned to next Thursday even- 
ing at half-past eight o'clock. 

The motion to assign was lost. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward lit— I hope this matter 
will be acted upon tonight. The gentleman from 
Ward 10 said be had not recently looked at the 
matter. I think that none of us who lollowed 
him in his remarks but knew that from the be- 
ginning. He had marked out the speech, and had 
the text, and preached a sermon accordingly, be- 
cause the gentleman from Ward 17 made an 
amendment which I accepted, and then he went 
on and made an essay about salaries, which has 
already been fixed in the minds of the Council. 

I think his argument tonight, and in relation to 
the Police Commissioners last week, don't agree. 
He is terribly afraid of getting broken-down men 
here, and not in the Police Commission. He is 
terribly complimentary to the gentlemen who 
have done faithfully and well in the Board of 
Aldermen, and is afraid they will become so 
many "taffy- jacks," and then he thinks they 
cannot get such good men for one year. 
It seems to me his logic is not good logic. 
Ir .-eems to me his objection cannot stand. 
He says they will be filled annually. That 
is not what we are talking about. Now 
we propose to have them for three years. 
He did n't get the text right. Then, in reference 
to the payment of those men, why, the gentleman 
himself has brought in a bill here to pay the Al- 
dermen and Councilmen salaries, and had it 
printed. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I desire to correct 
the gentleman. I did n't have it printed. 

Mi . Spenceley— It was printed and it was for 
the same purpose that I brought in this order. I 
did n't specify any sum ; I left that to the Council. 

I I vou waut to pay the Council sioo and the Board 
of Aldermen S500, it is all right. 

.Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— The gentleman don't 
want to misstate me, and I am sure he does. The 
gentleman will remember that the ordinance he 
does me the honor to say I proposed simply 
provided that in lieu, and for the ex- 
pense of attending to the business of the 
city, there shall be allowed for that purpose 
and no other, a certain sum each year should be 
drawn upon when a proper certificate was pre- 
sented to the Auditor that it had been expended 
while in the discharge of their duties as a member 
of the Council or Board of Aldermen. It was not 
a salary. The gentleman's memory is at fault in 
regard to the tenor and meaning of the ordinance. 

Mr. Spenceley — Are you done? Well, Mr. Pres- 
ident, I don't know whether it makes any differ- 
ence whether I give my boy five cents to pay for 
candy, or pay lor it myself when it cdfties in the 
bill. The order was there to vote so much money, 
and if dinners cost $3 apiece, it don't take long 



FEB RXJ A K Y a 8 



1878 



93 



to eat up $100. The only point was, it was a sal- 
ary as he proposed in his bill; and it don't make 
any difference how it is paid, or what you call it. 
As the gentleman from "Ward 17 stated, it will 
save much junketing'. I have had sever- 
al dinners this year, and they did n't cost 
more than $1.50 a piece. But the point I brought 
in is that the gentleman brought in the ordinance 
and had it referred the same night. I don't care 
much about this now. I only leave it to the 
Council to say. I don't have much to say upon it. 
I dsd it because X thought it proper, and because 
I thought it would make a better City Govern- 
ment than we have at the present time! 

Mr. Hibbard's amendment was adopted, and the 
order as amended was refused a second reading. 

COMPARATIVE LIST OF TAXPAYERS. 

On motion of Mr. Rust of Ward 10, the order to 
have furnished a series of tables showing in each 
ward the number of voters at the last election 
who paid only poll taxes and those who paid 
taxes on $1000 and upwards, was taken from the 
table and referred to the Committee on Assessors' 
Department. Sent up. 

BACK BAY PARK. 

Mr. Spenceley of "Ward 19 offered an order — 
That the Committee on Parks be requested to as- 
certain and report why the work authorized by the 
City Council in relation to tilling the park on the 
Back Bay has not been commenced. 

Mr. Spenceley — Some weeks ago, gentlemen 
may remember that the city appropriated $25,000 
in view of the fact that a committee was appoint- 
ed to see if the poor laboring men might not have 
some employment during the winter months. 
The Committee on Finance said thev might have 
the money. It has been three or four weeks since 
the order was passed, and I fail to rind out 
any reasons why it has not been com- 
menced. I have been down to the Park Commis- 
sioners' office and failed to do so, and I put in 
this order to find out why this work is not begun, 
and why some of the laboring men coming to our 
doors continually may not have work. The money 
was appropriated specially for this reason. There 
is the bank of earth, and there is the place to be 
filled, and why is it not done? 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 would ask the gen- 
tleman if he has seen the Park Commissioners. 

Mr. Spenceley— That is just the trouble. 1 went 
down there yesterday afternoon and the clerk 
told me to call this forenoon. I went to their of- 
fice, and to Mr. Gray's office, and to Mr. Dalton's, 
and I could n't find them. This is the only way I 
can find them. I cannot spend all my time look- 
ing after them. I would like to know some reason 
why the work has not been commenced. 

Mr. Thompson — I can give the gentleman one 
reason. The report of the committee stated that 
the money was to be expended in filling the road- 
ways leading from Brookline avenue into the 
park. The money to purchase that roadway was 
only appropriated last Thursday and went to the 
Board of Aldermen for concurrence, and did not 
get into the hands of the Park Commissioners 
until this week. 

Mr. Rosnosky of Ward 16—1 would state, in be- 
half of the gentleman from Ward 19, that 1 found 
they have different rooms, and they have a special 
department in the top floor. They stated that the 
amount appropriated, $25,000, was not for labor- 
ing men. They claim that they are not commis- 
sioners for almshouses, and they came to the con- 
clusion that that work should be done by a rail- 
road corporation, and that this Council said 
nothing about taking care of the laboring men, 
and therefore I made it my business not to go any 
further after them. 

Mr. Thompson— If the gentleman will study the 
report that accompanied the order he will see that 
the committee recommend that charity should 
not be given in the form of work; but' that the 
city should do its business on business principles. 
And the understanding with which this order 
was offered was that persons out of employment 
owning horses, which, to use a common term, 
were "eating their heads off," might go to the 
city's bank, take the gravel, and haul it to the 
park, provided that they would deliver it as 
cheaply as it could be done by contract. Thus 
the city could do its work as cheaply as it could 
be done by contract, at the same time be benefit- 
ing a class that needed help. But the difficulty 
has been that many gentlemen of this Council 
seem to think that that money was appropriated 
to provide contracts for some of their friends. 
They are not satisfied with doing the work as 



cheaply as it can be done by railroads or 
contractors, but they expect more. There 
seems to be an idea prevailing in the Com- 
munity that the city stands in somewhat the re- 
lation of a father who is bound to provide for a 
large family of children. Now, there is a law 
which regulates the duty of the city in resard to 
that, and it points out the way in which a man 
in need of aid must and shall be aided by the city. 
But the city, on the other hand, as trustees for all 
its citizens is bound to do its business in the same 
way as the business of other corporations is done, 
certainly as honestly and cheaply as as any 
other. There is no better means of opening 
the way to frauds than the pretence of benefiting 
the poor laborer in this way. It does the poor man 
an immense amount of harm. The annual special 
appropriation for soup for poor men is the worst 
thing that can be donefor the laborers of the city 
of Boston— those who live here from year to year, 
who have their homes and really belong here— 
because it is a constant source of attraction to lure 
men into the city and increase the competition 
under which our own men siuffer. It is a 
constant complaint that contractors bring men 
here from a distance, and that those men stay 
here. Why do they? Because they find that the 
city of Boston is paying very largely more than 
the market rate of wa'ges." It "is a temptation to 
them. A man says, "I can get more from the city 
for three or four days' work than [ can from pri- 
vate employers for a week" — so he remains, hang- 
ing on and begging for work, and pushing our own 
laboring men out of their places. I am just as 
desirous of aiding the poor men of Boston as any 
man in this Council; but I do not believe in this 
constant talk about providing help for poor men, 
when what is really meant is to give contracts to 
some one, out of which money is to be made at 
the expense of the city. 

Mr. Rosnosky of Ward 16 — I uuderstoodthe or- 
der was brought in for the reason that it would 
give labor to the unemployed laborers of the city 
of Boston, and not, as the gentleman from Ward 
9 says, to give fat contracts to any one. I claim 
that it was done for the laboring classes of this 
city. The Park Commissioners said they would 
not have the right, and perhaps we would not 
have expended that amount of money, but so 
many men were out of employment that it was 
given to them. The gentleman states that 
so many people come here to get labor. I would 
like to know how many would come here from 
New York to get work at $1 a day. 

Mr. Spenceley— It is all very well for the gentle- 
man from Waf d 9, who has never been iu suffer- 
ing or want. If he had, he would n't have talked 
as he has here tonight. It is all well for him. 
with his warm home and well-filled table, for he 
has never suffered as the poor of Boston 
do. I hope he will never suffer as the laboring 
men suffer today, and I hope some of the gentle- 
men opposite will not. But I want the gentleman 
to understand that when they brought in this 
thing tbey didn't say this iu the report. The re- 
port reads— 

[Mr. Spenceley read the report and orders from 
the joint special committee to consider what can 
be done for the relief of destitute citizens.] 

I ao not know, Mr. President, what to think of 
the gentleman's remarks tonight after reading 
this report heaping epitaphs upon the laboring 
men, which was drawn by himself and signed by 
his own name, authorizing this work to be done, 
and specifying that it ought to be done now; that 
there is the bank of ground and it ought to betak- 
en, and then all this talk about laboring men com- 
ing into Boston, and then throwing innuendoes. 

Mr. Ward— I called upon the chairman of the 
Park Commission last week and asked him the 
same question, and he stated that unless the wa- 
ters of Muddy Brook were diverted and carried 
across into Charles River they could not com- 
mence the work. If they commenced filling on 
the easterly side of Western avenue it would cut 
off a portion of this creek, and a nuisance would 
be formed ; and this work could not go on until a 
committee is appointed to confer with the 
town of Brookline. and he proposed to put that 
business iu the hands of the Committee on Stony 
Brook. Those were the reasons stated to me whv 
this work cannot be commenced at the present 
time. 

Mr. Spenceley— I don't know what to do, hard- 
ly. A gentleman stated the other day that he was 
going to handle this matter without* gloves; and 
it seems to me it is pretty well gloved up now. I 
think the only way to get over it is to pass the or- 



v>-t 



COMMON COUNCIL 



der. The gentleman from Ward 9 said this was 
not put in to give the laboring men work. I doD't 
known what language means. The committee 
were appointed to investigate this matter and see 
if any work could he done in this way. 

Mr. Webster of Ward :S— The gentleman from 
Ward 19 has offered a simple order of inquiry 
that can do no possible harm and I can see no oc- 
oasion for a long discussion. 

Mr. Barry of Ward 22— If this City Council have 
not a right to ask a question of a commission 
emanating from the City Council, it is a powerful 
argument against commissions and shows what 
can be expected of them when we have many 
more of them. I am aware that when a gentle- 
man says anything in favor of the laboring men 
he is lia'ble to hear the cry of buncombe; but the 
gentlemen who raise the cry are the first to use it. 
I voted for the order with the understanding that 
it was to relieve the poor, and if the Park Com- 
missioners are going to sit back on their dignity 
let us understand it. A large part of the 
money must be done by railroads, but much 
can lie done by teams, and I don't know what 
Muddy Brook has to do with it. 1 have heara a 
great many inquiries about why the work was not 
commenced, and it seems tome the proposition 
of the gentleman from Ward 19 will solve the 
problem. 

Mr. Thompson— There is no possible objection 
to the order, and I make none. If men will go 
there with teams and dump gravel on the park as 
cheaply as it can be done by contract, they can go 
there tomorrow and do so. 

Mr. Brawley of Ward 19— It is a mere matter of 
inquiry for information, and I think the order 
ought to pass. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 
Sent up. 

liATUINC DEP MM'MKNT. 

On motion of Mr. Richardson of Ward 10. the 
order to report an ordinance to place the bathiusr 
department under the Board of Health was taken 
from the table. 

The question was on referring it to the Com- 
mittee on Ordinances. 

Mr. Richardson explained that he had found 
there were no ordinances regulating the depart- 
ment, and the reference might lead to doing away 
with the system of conducting the business by an 
order passed each year. 

.Mr. Pearl objected to the reference, and said. 
the department had been economically managed. 

Mr. McGaragle said the department was run in 
accordance with the statute. 



On motion of Mr. Crocker, the yeas and navs 
were ordered, and the motion to refer to the Com- 
mittee on Ordinances was lost — yeas 27, nays 35: 

Yeas— Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Colby. 
Crocker, Dauforth, Hibbard, Hill, Lauten, Mowr'v. 
Nason, Perhani, Pierce, Plimpton, .). B. Richard- 
son. M. W. Richardson, E. H. Sampson, I). H. 
Sampson, H. N. Sawyer, X. Sawyer, Shepaid, 
Smith, Thompson, Ward, Webster, Wolcotr, Wv- 
man— 27. 

Nays— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, N. 
Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, Devlin, Doherty, 
Drynan, Fernald, Flynn, Ham, Howland, Kellev, 
Kendricken, Kidney, Lovering, McDonald, Mi - 
Gahey, McGaragle, McGeough, Mullaue, Mullen, 
O'Connor, Pearl, Roach. Rosnosky, Santrv, Spence- 
ley, J. Taylor, Thomdike, Toppan, Whicher, Wil- 
son, Woolley— 35. 

Absent or not voting— Messrs. (Joe, Cox, Day, 
Denny, Hollis, Roberts, Rust, Sibley, J. F. Tay- 
lor— 9. 

Mr. Pearl moved to indefinitely postpone. 

Ruled out of order. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Barnard of 
Ward 24. 



f As there were several typographical errors in 
the ballot for First Assistant Assessors in the re- 
port of the last meeting, the following correct re- 
port is given:] 

Whole number of votes, 65: necessary for a 




Brown, 57; Horace Loring, 58; Joseph I,. Drew, 
flO; William H. Cnndy, 44; Phineas B. Smith, 41; 
John H. Giblin, 62; Joseph R. Grose, 61; 
Thomas Leavitt, 63; Charles B. Hunting, 62; 
Theophilus Burr, 58; William B. Smart, 60; Geor«e 
F. Williams, 00; John McElroy, 45; L. Foster 
Morse, 53: Charles E. Grant, 54; Andrew J. 
Browne, 63; John H. Griggs, 62; (.eorge A. Com- 
ins. 59; Charles K. Temple, 61; Gideon Walker, 57; 
John Pierce, 57; Henry Pierce, 58: Charles Now- 
ell,58; Richard B. Smart, 68; William A.Wheeler, 
41; Joseph Bobbins, 6; John A. McLaughlin. 29: 
Edward Riley, 24; Thomas J. Anderson, l'.">; Em- 
erson Coolidge, 10; Dualey Pray, 18; Francis 
James, 22; John Leahy, 3; Dennis Moore, 27: 
William G. Train, 21; John Noble, 34; George W. 
Kingman, 1; Francis E. Hines, 27; John W. 
Brown, 4: .iarvis D. Braman, 13: John W. Steere, 
1 ; William S. Anderson, 1. 



95 



HOARD OF ALDEKMKJS 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

MARCH 4, 18"--. 



Regular meeting at 7V 2 o'clock P. M., Aliieruiau 
Stebbins, Chairman, presiding. 

EXECUTIVE Nomination*. 

Railroad Police for Boston & Albany Railread— 
Greenleaf Colby Day, John Henry Carpenter, Ho- 
bart Robinson. Connrmed. 

Special Police Officers— Xelson Jenney, Leigh 
R. Worcester, Henry A. Fenn, Henry X. Lougley, 
George \Y. Maunder. Confirmed. 

Inspector of Provisions— Samuel Warden. Con- 
firmed. 

To the Committee on Polict . Ot. B. Bunnell, for 
leave to suspend a flag from International Hotel, 
on Washington street. 

To the Committee on Police. Joseph Morrill, 
Jr., to be compensated for loss ot fowls killed by 
dogs. 

To the Committee on Bridge*. James Sullivan, 
that a suitable shelter be provided for the horse 
used in opening and closing the Meridian-street 
draw. 

To the Committee on Paving. Kiluy Page etal., 
for flagging crossing across Tremont street at 
Downer street; Nahum Capen et al., chat Bowdoin 
street, Ward 24, be put in order for public travel; 
Bradford E. (iline et nl ., that Bunker Hill street, 
from Vine to Greeu street, be put in order for 
travel; James M. Conlon, that Vale street may 
be graded, etc.; Kitch'ourg Railroad Company, for 
leave to connect their track with the Union 
Freight Railroad track on Causeway street: 
Sarah P. Cleaveland, tor crosswalk across Per- 
kins street and Pond avenue, Jamaica Plain; 
Patrick Crosby et al.. tor edgestones and gutters 
on Call street, Jamaica Plain; Second Parish 
Church, Dorchester, et at., for plank walks on 
Centre and Washington streets; Union Freight 
Railroad Company, tor leave to construct a track 
from Commercial street to Constitution wharf; 
Moses H. Day, lor a brick sidewalk on Heath 
street, near Day street; Board of Fire Commis- 
sioners, that the* roauway leading to the houses of 
Engine Company 17 and Hook and Ladder Com- 
pany 7, on Meeting House Hill, be put in order: 
Timothy Allen, for leave to remove a wooden 
building from South street, Ward 23, to Keye 
street, opposite Call street. 

To the Committee on Public /.umts. Charles 
L. Smith, for leave to erect a greenhouse on land 
near Chester square, on Washington street. 

vv the Committee on Claims. Charles Down- 
ing, to be compensated for personal injuries sus- 
tained on Jan. 11, 1*77, by an alleged defect in the 
highway ; Thomas T. Robinson, to be compensated 
for injuries done to his horse on the "draw of 
Broadway Bridge: Martin Connolly, to be paid for 
damages for personal iujuries received while in 
the employ of the city. 

To the Committee on Bathing. Charles Marsh 
it al., that a bath house be established at Xepon- 
set this year. 

IMD asmsiavi ASSESSORS. 

A report came down that it is inexpedient to 
pass the order for an ordinance placing the ap- 
pointment of Second Assistant Assessors in the 
hands of the Principal Assessors. Accepted, in 
concurrence. 

A report came down making nominations for 
Second Assistant Assessors. Accepted in concur- 
rence, and ballot ordered. Committee— Aldermen 
Faonce, Guild and Whiton. 

On motion of Alderman McLean, the Board took 
a recess, at the end of which the committee re- 
ported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 11 

Neeessarv for a choice G 

Those marked with stars were elected on the part of 
the Board. 
Wan/ 1. 

•Isaiah Whitten 11 

Ward 2. 

♦Albert H. Taylor 11 

Wards. 
*.I ohn Bryant 11 

Ward 4. 

•D. D. Taylor 11 

Want .-..' 
•Dennis G. Quirk 11 



Ward 6. 

•John Carvin 8 

Michael D. Collins 4 

John Fay 2 

•James L. Quigley 8 

Ward 7. 

Edward J. Riley 3 

•Samuel B. Krogman 7 

J.J. A. Gil rain 1 

Ward s. 
•Thomas .1. Anderfon 10 

Ward 9. 

Walter Harmon 1 

•Frank Fuller <i 

E. Coolidge 1 

Ward It). 

•William S. Whitney 11 

•Increase K. Nov es H 

Ward 11. 

•John K. Brigga 11 

* James Btanatsh n 

Ward 12. 

•John Osborne. Jr 11 

•Alfred 1. Woodbury 11 

Ward 13. 
•Dudley Pray 11 

Wardl*. 
•Hosea B. Bowen ..11 

Ward IB. 
•Daniel J. Holland In 

Ward 19. 
•w. w. Dromey io 

K. A. Wilkins.'. 1 

Wad 17. 
•Dudley B. Child 11 

Want is. 
•Samuel P. Oliver 11 

Ward\9. 

Francis E. Bines 1 

Thomas Riley 1 

John Over...' I 

•Joshua Dyer 8 

Ward 20. 

•Frederick H. Field 10 

Edward W. Dolan 5 

•Joseph White, Jr 7 

Ward 21. 

•John C. Cook <> 

•George Warren 1(1 

Matthew B. Walsh 3 

Ward 22. 
•1'atii.k B. Sogers 11 

Ward 23. 
'Edward P. Butler it 

•John F. l'ayson 11 

Ward 24. 

•William Wellington 11 

•Joseph E. Hall 11 

Ward 25. 

irge W. Warren 11 

Sent down. 

I .LLANEOl s PAPEKS 1'ltOM TIIE COMMON 
COUNI II.. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Annual report of the Inspector of Buildings. 
(City Doc. 24.) Placed on file. 

Report referring to the Committee on Public 
Buildings the subject of providing "fire-escapes" 
for the Latin and English II iirh School House on 
Bedford street. Accepted and referred accord- 
ingly in concurrence. 

Order for offer of a reward of $500 for the detec- 
tion and conviction of the party or parties who 
murdered James H. Daley, on Feb. 4, 1878. Passed 
in concurrence. 

Order that pay rolls of laborers employed by the 
city be made up every two weeks. Referred to 
the Committee on Accounts in concurrence. 

Order tor Committee on Public Buildings to con- 
sider the expediency o< providing a new ward- 
room for Ward 22." Referred to Committee on 
Public Buildings in concurrence. 

Order tor Committee on Public Parks to ascer- 
tain and report why work has not been commenced 
on the Back Bay park. 

Alderman Guild— I don't know that I have any 
special objection to that order ot inquiry being 
passed. But I merely wish to say on behalf of the 
Committee on Parks, and also so far as it relates 
to the Park Commissioners, that the reason the 
rilling has not been commenced is that they could 
not get a clear title to the land. They have been 
endeavoring to do that as rapidly as possible, but 
it has been delayed by the necessary absence of 
individuals from the* city. I have understood 
that they will commence the filling within two 



MARCH 4. 1878. 



96 



days— possibly tomorrow or the next day. I do 
not rise to object to the order, but simply to say 
that every pessible step has been taken to have 
this work proceed at once. 

The order was passed in concurrence. 

Notice of the appointment of Mr. Mowry on 
Special Committee on Mercantile Wharf Market 
in place of Mr. Coe, who declines service thereon. 
Placed on file. 

Orders to have furnished a series of tables show- 
ing in each ward the number of voters at the last 
election who paid only poll taxes, and those who 
paid taxes on $1000 and upwards. Referred to 
Committee on Assessors' Department in con- 
currence. 

Reports of leave to withdraw on claims submit- 
ted by Benjamin H. Stinson, Ann Morris, Wil- 
liam W. Wallace and Thomas Brown. Severally 
accepted in concurrence. 

DIVERSION OF MUDDY BROOK. 

Alderman Guild presented the following: 

To the Honorable the City Council of the City of 
Boston — The undersigned, propeity owners and 
residents of Ward 22, respectfully represent that 
the sewers of the western portion of said ward 
empty into Muddy River, and that, owing to the 
tortuous course of the bed of the river, the sew- 
age is deposited upon its banks, thereby becom- 
ing a great nuisance, and endangering the health 
of the residents in its vicinity and damaging their 
estates, it has been a cause of complaint for sev- 
eral years by the Board of Health. 

In order to abate this nuisance it is necessary 
that the city unite with the town of Brookline, as 
provided in the act of the Legislature, chapter 
267 of the year 1872, which empo wers the said town 
and city to divert the waters of Muddy River so 
as to make them flow in a more direct line to 
Charles River. 

Believing that the low prices of labor and ma- 
terials are conditions favorable to the immediate 
prosecution of the work, we therefore respectfully 
request that the City Counc'l will take such ac- 
tion as is necessary, in connection with the town 
of Brookline, to continue the improvement of the 
course of said river, made by said town, along the 
Brookline Branch Railroad in a direct line to 
Charles River. 

Boston, Feb. 2G, 1878. 

[Signed by William R. Lawrence ana many oth- 
ers.] 

Read and referred to the Joint Special Commit- 
tee on the Improvement of Stony Brook. Sent 
down. 

BOATS ON PUBLIC GARDEN POND. 

Alderman Guild submitted a report from Joint 
Committee on Common of leave to withdraw on 
petition of T. A. Splaine for leave to place boats 
on the Public Garden Pond. Accepted. Sent 
down. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Guild submitted reports from the 
Committee on Licenses as follows: 

Minors' Applications Granted — One bootblock, 
twenty-one newsboys. 

Amusement License Granted— G. B. Bunnell, 
to exhibit a collection of natural curiosities at 
Beethoven Hall for four weeks. 

Amusement License Refused — B. F. Lowell, 
agent, to give dramatic performances at Beetho- 
ven Hall. 

Victuallers Licensed— Frank H. Dodge, 819 Tre- 
mont street; William Stone, 193 Eliot street; 
George Abbott, 10 State street. 

Auctioneers Licensed— Charles F. Libbie, 13 
Beacon street. 

Wagon License Granted— George Kennard, cor- 
ner of Washington and Market streets; A. H. 
Wilson, 29 Doane street; A. B. Lothrop, 2G Dev- 
onshire street; J. J. Kelley, 182 Centre street, 
Roxbury. 

Passenger Wagons Licensed— George W. Calef, 
to run two excursion wagons from Bowdoin 
square to Rowe's, Litchfield's and India wharves 
aud return, between May 1 and Oct. 1; Currier & 
Sanders, to run a passenger wagon from Sullivan 
square, Ward 4, to Litchfield's, Rowe's and India 
wharves, from May 1 to Oct. 1; Robinson & Eme- 
ton, to run two passenger wagons from Haymar- 
ket square to Rowe's and Litchfield's wharves; 
William Fletcher, to run a passenger wagon from 
Fitchburg Railroad station to Rowe's and Litch- 
field's wharves ; G. A. Colrnan, to run two 
passenger wagons from Bowdoin square to Rowe's 
wharf. 

Severally accepted. 



PERMIT FOR STEAM ENGINE. 

Alderman McLean submitted a report that 
leave be granted Moulton & Goodwin to use a 
steam engine at 119-123 Water street. Accepted. 

PAYING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

. Alderman Whidden submitted the following 
from the Committee on Paving: 

Report and order that the street leading from 
Wesley street to Salem-Hill court, Charlestown 
District, be hereafter called and known as 
"Holden Row," and that the Superintendent of 
Streets be diiected to place street signs upon and 
number said street. Order read once. 

Ordered, That from the assessment laid upon 
the estate of Lawrence Norton for edgestones 
furnished on Boylston avenue there be abated the 
sum of $9, and that said amount be assessed to 
Lawrence Kelly for edgestones furnished on Boyl- 
ston avenue. Read once. 

Report and order granting permission to Saw- 
yer, Hollis & Co. to set telegraph posts on West- 
ern avenue and Market street, Brighton, upon the 
usual conditions. Order read once. 

Report that l^ave be granted A. E. Pratt to 
water certain streets in Roxbury upon the usual 
conditions. Accepted. 

MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE MECHANIC ASSOCI- 
ATION TRIENNIAL EXHIBITION. 

Alderman Haydeu submitted the following : 

The joint special committee to whom was re- 
ferred the petition of the Massachusetts Cnarita- 
ble Mechanic Association for leave to use a por- 
tion of the parade ground on Boston Common for 
the erection of a temporary building in which to 
hold the thirteenth exhibition of industry, skill 
and art, or that some other suitable plot of ground 
belonging to the city be designated, having con- 
sidered the subject, beg leave to submit the fol- 
lowing report: 

The Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Asso- 
ciation has, since 1837. been granted the use of 
Faneuii and Quincy halls for the purpose of hold- 
ing its triennial exhibitions of industry and art. 
Tnese exhibitions, which were a success from the 
beginning, have increased in interest and in the 
quantity of goods displayed, until those halls are 
no longer capacious enough to contain the exhib- 
its which are offered, or to accommodate the 
crowds of visitors. The last exhibition was held 
in 1874, and although all the available space was 
utilized, the association was obliged to refuse a 
large number of exhibits which were offered, from 
want oi room to display them. The association, 
therefore, finds itself compelled to seeu other and 
more commodious quarters, or to discontinue the 
exhibitions altogether. The thirteenth triennial 
exhibition was to have been held in the months of 
September and October, 1877, and in anticipation of 
the event the applications for space were greater 
than ever before. The representatives of our lead- 
ing industries assured the association that they 
would make an unequalled exhibition of their goods 
providing that a sufficient amount of space was 
afforded them. The association, therefore, deter- 
mined to erect an exhibition building, if a suita- 
ble location could be obtained, and applied to the 
City Council for leave to use a portion of the pa- 
rade ground for the purpose. Permission was re- 
fused, and the association, being unable to find 
another suitable location, decided to aban ion the 
idea of giving the exhibition. Much disappoint- 
ment was caused both to exhibitors, who had 
made preparations for the exhibition and who 
were prevented from displaying their goods, and 
to the public, who were deprived of the opportu- 
nity ot witnessing an exhibition which promised 
to surpass in extent and interest anything of the 
kind that had before been given in this city. 

Since then the association has been induced to 
reconsider its action, and has decided to hold an 
exhibition during the present year, if a suitable 
site for a building can be obtained. The request 
for leave to use a portion of the parade ground is 
therelore renewed, but with the alternative re- 
quest, that in case permission to erect a building 
on the Common should not be granted, some 
other suitable location may be designated. 

While a majority of the committee are individu- 
ally in favor of allowing the exhibition to be held 
upon the Common, they are of the opinion that 
so many of our citizens regard any encroachment 
upon the Common with such disfavor that, shou'd 
the request be granted, an opposition would be 
aroused which would be of no benefit, if not a 
positive injury, to the interests of the association. 
The committee, therefore, believe that it is inex- 
pedient to grant permission to use the Common. 



97 



''.uARD OF ALDEKMEN 



With regard to the alternative request of the 
petitioners, tlie committee are ot the opinion that 
the city's laud, situated at the junction of Colum- 
bus avenue and Pleasant aud Eliot streets, can be 
made available tor the purposes ot the associa- 
tion. 'Ibis land comprises an area of 38,100 square 
teet.is centrally located, easily accessible, and ap- 
parently, next to the Common, the most desirable 
location to be obtained. If, in addition to grant- 
ing the use of this land, permission were to be 
given to use tbe Tennyson-street Primary Scnool- 
house, whicb adjoins it, as an annex lor the re- 
ception of tbe more valuable exhibits, sufficient 
room would be obtained to meet the wants of the 
petitioners. 

If permission to use this land is granted, the 
association proposes to erect thereon a building 
of fine architectural appearance and provided 
with every facility tor the proper display of goods 
aud the accommodation ot'visitors. The building 
will be removed at the close of tbe exhibition, 
and no inconvenience will be occasioned to the 
public. Every precaution will be taken to pre- 
vent injury to persons or property, the associa- 
tion agreeing to protect the city against any loss 
in that respect. 

Your committee are of the opinion that the use 
ot the land in question should be granted to the 
petitioners, believing that the concession will be 
regarded in the light of a public benefit. 

The Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Asso- 
ciation has been a liberal patron ot the arts and 
manufactures, and has expended large sums in 
rewarding meritorious skill in the different 
branches of the useful art-. Its exhibitions have 
been the means of introducing to the public many 
useful inventions, which have been of ereat bene- 
fit to the community. They have afforded enter- 
tainment and instruction not oDly to our own citi- 
zens, but to thousands ot visitors from abroad; 
while by attracting here inventors, manufacturers 
and purchasers troui all parts of tne country, they 
have been a direct benefit to the business of the 
city. 

Your committee, therefore, recommend that the 
association be granted permission to use the land 
and building before mentioned, and to that end 
respectfully recommend tbe passage of the ac- 
companying orders. 

S. B. Stebbins. 

Ciiai;li-> Kai DEW, 

Thomas J. Whidden. 

William J, BUBKE. 

Howard Clait. 

John F. Colby. 

John Taylor. 

John J. Smith. 
Ordered, That the Massachusetts Charitable 
Mechanic Association be and it is hereby author- 
ized to occupy the lots of land owned by the city, 
situated atthe junction of Columbus avenue, 
Pleasant street and Eliot street, and to erect 
thereon a building for tbe purpose of holding an 
exhibition of industry and art, provided that the 
said association will agree to remove said build- 
ing at tbe close of tbe said exhibition, or when- 
ever ordered to no so by the Board of Aldermen 
or City Couocil, and provided, further, that the 
said association will give a bond, satisfactory to 
the City Solicitor, to defend the city against all 
claims "on account of or arising from" the occu na- 
tion of the said land for tbe purpose aforesaid. 



Ordered, That the Massachusetts Charitable 
Mechanic Association be and it is hereby author- 
ized, with the consent of tbe School Committee, 
to occupy the Tennyson-street Primary School- 
house, for the purposes of its exhibition; and that 
the Superintendent of Public Buildings be author- 
ized to make arrangements satisfactory to tbe 
School Committee, for the accommodation ot the 
schools in that district during such time as tbe 
building is occupied for such purpose; the ex- 
pense to be charged to the appropriation for 
Schoolhouses, Public Buildings. 

The orders were read twice and passed. Sent 
down. 

STA1SLES, ETC. 

Alderman Yiles submitted reports from the 
Committee on Health as follows: 

That leave be granted to occupy stables by A. 
Klaeger, rear 112 Longwood avenue; Mark Morse, 
rear chain factory, Athens street; L. S.Howard, 
Lincoln street, Ward 24; H. S. Lawrence, 2328 
Washington street. 

01 leave to withdraw on petition to occupy 
stable, by C.E.Paige, 012 Fifth street (for two 
additional horses). 

That leave be granted Laurin A. Noyes to ex- 
cavate a cellar, 257 Sumner street, to a" depth of 
two feet below grade. 

Severally accepted. 

CLAIMS. 

Alderman Harris submitted reports from the 
Committee on Claims of leave to withdraw on pe- 
titions of \V. E. L. Dillaway to be compensated 
for personal injuries caused by a fall on South 
street, and John Uadilin to be compensated tor 
patent cusbioi.s provided for steam fire engine 
No. 7. Severally accepted. Sent down. 

BRIDGES. 

Alderman Harris submitted orders for the Com- 
mittee on Bridges to expend not exceeding $3000 
in repairing the draw pier of Cambridge-street 
Bridge, Brighton, and not exceeding $1000 in re- 
pairing the draw of Maiden Bridge, severally to 
be charged to tbe appropriation for Bridges. Sev- 
erally read twice and passed. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, a ballot was ta- 
ken for Commissioner of Bridges between Boston 
and Cambridge, and Frederic W. Lincoln was 
elected. 

CONFIRMED. 

On mot ion of Alderman Yiles, the executive ap- 
pointment of John H. Ferry to be Inspector of 
Provisions and Superintendent of Faneuil Hall 
was taken from the table and confirmed. 

MYSTIC VALLEY RAILROAD. 

On motion of Alderman Harris, the petition of 
Mystic Yalley Railroad Corporation for approval 
of location was taken from the table and the pe- 
titioners were given leave to withdraw, they not 
having put in an appearance. 

FENCE VIEWERS, El< . 

Alderman McLean offered an order — That 

Aldermen be appointed to nominate suitable 

candidates for the offices of Fence Viewers, Field 
Drivers, etc., Inspector of Lime and Culler of 
Hoops, etc. Passed, and Aldermen McLean, 
Robinson and Whit >n were appointed. 

Adjourned, on motion of Alderman Harris. 



98 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council. 



MARCH 



L878. 



Regular meeting at 7y 2 o'clock P. M., Benjamin 
Pope, President, in the cbair. 

AUDITOR'S estimate.-. 

The President announced the receipt ol the 
Auditor's estimates tor 1878-79 (City Doc. 25;, 
•which was received and referred to the Finance 
Committee, with such as the Board of Aldermen 
may join: 

Office <>f the Additob of Aoooi m i -, i 
City Hali, .March 5, 1878. I 

lu njii mm J'ojie, Km/., /'resident of the Common 
Council : Sir— Complying with the requirement of 
the ordinance in relation to finance, I have the 
honor of presenting' to the City Council the ac- 
companying estimates of the money which will 
be required to defray the expenses of the city of 
Boston and county of Suffolk for the financial 
year 1878-9, commencing May 1, 1878, and termi- 
nating April 30, 1879, exclusive of Boston's pro- 
portion of the State tax of 1878, which will be 
levied by the Board of Assessors under authority 
of law of the Commonwealth. The financial year 
included the Auditor's general draft on the 
Treasurer made up at the close of April, payable 
the 1st of May. 

It is manifest that the financial affairs Ol our 
municipality now containing probably 375,000 in- 
habitants, and covering so large an extent of ter- 
ritory as is embraced within i^s limits, cannot be 
conducted even with commendable prudence and 
judicious economy without a heavy expenditure 
of money annually, but it was hoped that in pre- 
senting these estimates they would not have ag- 
gregated so great a sum as given, to be raised by 
taxation upon the property ot the city in its pres- 
ent condition and shrinking valuation. The iteius 
making up the estimates, all of which of right 
should be taxed if required, have, however, nearly 
all been examined and approved by appropriate 
committees, and they will be turther scrutinized 
by the joint committee to whom they will be 
referred, and by your honorable bodies, as to 
whether the actual" needs of the Government the 
coming financial year, for a proper and judicious 
administration of its affairs, require the several 
amounts asked for. If required tuey should l>e 
raised by taxation and not by borrowing money 
iu any event. 

The amount for the County ol Suffolk shows an 
increase of $35,000 necessitated by the provisions 
ot chapter 210, ?ection 2, ol the acts ot tne Massa- 
chusetts Legislature of 1877, requiring the several 
counties each to pay the salaries of"' the justices 
and clerks of the municipal ana police courts lo- 
cated in their respective counties, which, prior to 
Jan. 1, 1878, were paid by the State. An extra ap- 
propriation of $10,000 is also asked tor, to build a 
new brick boiler house in the jail yard, to be con- 
nected with the jail building. 

The amount; required for the running expenses 
ol the schools is $1,012,564, of which $1,161,864 is 
for the pay of school instructors, and $56,700 for 
officers of the School Committee, the salaries ot 
which that body nave the exclusive power to fix. 
$62,000 is required for new scboolhouses, making 
a total for school purposes. $1 ,674,564. For like pur- 
poses last year, si, 631,020. For new scboolhouses, 
$30,000 is required for an iron roof for the English 
High and Latin School buildings, instead of a 
wooden one as originally contemplated; $30,000 
for a six-room brick primary schoolhouse on 
Polk street, Charlestown District, and S2000 for 
fitting and furnishing the primary schoolhouse in 
the Sherwin District. The amount of $30,000 for 
the new primary schoolhouse, on land owned by 
the city on Polk street, Charlestown District, is 
the sum given by the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings as the probable cost of a six-room 
brick building. The request for this schoolhouse 
is made by the School Committee, and is now be- 
fore the Committee on Public Instruction of the 
City Council, awaiting their action. 

The amount of interest on all the city debt, ex- 
clusive of the Water Works iuterest, which is paid 
from the revenue derived from those works, shows 
favorably the healthy working of the Sinking 
Fund system, there being a reduction of $79,000 
as compared with last year, and of $288,00 



compared with two years ago. The total amount 
to be raised by taxation in tbe estimates is 
(1,619,000. The estimated amounts of interest to 
be paid from Water Works revenue is, from Co- 
chituate Water Works, $760,000; Mystic Water 
Works, $69,580. Total estimated amount of inter- 
est to be paid, $2,448,580. 

Tbe amount of $45,000, which the Directors ot 
the East Boston Ferries require for a new ferry 
boat, is placed iu the estimates, subject to the 
action of the City Council thereon, now pending. 

The Committee on Streets ask for an appropria- 
tion of $100,000, for grading and putting iu order 
new streets, principally in the outlying wards, 
which the Board of Street Commissioners may lay 
out, to be expended under the direction of the 
Superintendent of Streets. 

The Paving Department require $900,000, which 
is $50,000 in excess of the amount granted last 
year, but the same as was asked tor then. 

The Board of Directors for Public Institutions, 
in their requisition, show a net increase for gen- 
eral expenses of $6410 over last year, and ask for 
$25,000 for stoue-cuttiug expenses at Deer and 
Rainsford islands, which is offset in the revenue 
column by $35,000 to be derived from the sale of 
prepared stone, and $2800 for a new barn and coal 
sheds on Rainslord Island. 

The Board of Park Commissioners require $10,- 
000 for the current expenses of their department. 

The Board of Trustees of Mt. Hope Cemetaiy 
represent that they actually need more land for 
the proper burial of the poor, and ask for $4500 
for that purpose. 
The estimated expenditures for 1878-79 

are 010,256,702 

The estimated income tor 1878-79 is 2,281,950 

#7 ,974,752 
To which add three per cent, for the 
amount which will not be paid into the 
treasury during the financial year 239,243 

We have a total which, in the judgment ot 
the Auditor of Accounts, should be the 
tax for 1878, exclusive of the State tax.. #8.213,995 



The following is a comparison of the appropria- 
tions asked for and estimated income compared 
with those of 1877-78: 

1878-79. 1877-78. 

Appropriations #10,250,702 #10,267.258 

Income 2,281,950 2,369,100 

#7,974,752 #7,898,158 

Percentage 239,243 230,946 

#8,213,995 $8,135,104 



Showing an increase of the appropriation, es- 
timates and percentage, less revenue tor the finan- 
cial year, compared with those of 1877-78, of 
878,891. 

The following table will exhibit the amount 
which will be required to be taxed this year, 
placing the State tax at the sum estimated by the 
State authorities to the Legislature at the com- 
mencement of its session, viz., $1,000,000. There 
is now a project before the Legislature to reduce 
the tax upon savings banks, and if a reduction to 
any extent is made it may make necessary an in- 
crease of the State tax. If the tax should be $1,- 
000,000, Boston's proportion will be $412,740. 

1878 7ii 1877-78 
City and county, estimat- 
ed and percentages #8,213,995 #8.135,104 

state, estimated 412,740 619,110 



#8,626,735 



#8,754,214 



This shows a reduction of the amount to be 
taxed of $127,479, caused by the reduction in the 
amount of the State tax, if it should be placed for 
the State at $1,000,000. Tbe amount of reduction 
of Boston's share of the State tax if the whole 
tax is $1,000,000, as compared with last year is 
$206,370. Increase of the city and county appro- 
priations and percentages less revenue, compared 
with last year, $78,891, leaving $127,479, as before 
stated. 

The Board ol Assessors may add to this sum to 
be taxed of $8,626,735, by warrant of law, five per 
cent., tor the purpose of covering abatements, 
etc., a sum equal to $431,337, making a total tax 
levy of $9,058,072. 

The Assessors' valuation of the city for the 
purposes of taxation, 1877, was $686,802,100, and 
estimating that there will be a further reduction 
in the valuation of taxable propeitythe present 
year, and placing the valuation at $660,000,000, 



MARCH 



18 78 



99 



and the amount to be raised on poll taxes at $160,- 
000, The rate per each 81000 of property would be 
§513.49, against $13.10 last year, as follows: 

Total tax levy, 1878, estimated $9, 058, 072 

Less poll taxes, say 80,000, at $2 160,000 

Leaving the amount to be raised by taxa- 
ation on the valution of real and person- 
al estates $8,898,072 



With the valuation of real and personal proper- 
ty at #660,000,000, and adopting the rate of $13.49 
per each $1000 of property, we have a total of 
$8,903,400. 

The following table shows the rate of taxation 
for each $1000 of property for the past four years, 
and the valuation of the real and personal estate 
on which it was based, viz. : 

Year. Valuation. Rate tax 

per #1000. 

1874 #798,755,050.00 #15.60 

1875--' 793,961,895.00 13.70 

1876 748,878.100.00 12.70 

1877 686,802,100.00 13.10 

Below, and on pages 6, 7 and 8, may be found 
comparative tables of the estimates for 1878-79, 
with the actual appropriations for 1877-78, and of 
the estimated income for 1878-79, compared with 
that estimated for 1877-78. 
Appropriations of 1877-78 — Estimates for 1878-79. 

Estimated. 
1877-78. 1878-79. Increase. Decrease. 
Advertis - 

ing $2,500 #1,600 .... #900 

•Archi- 
tect's 

Dep't.... .... 15,000 #15,000 

Armories, 22.000 20,000 .... 2,000 

Assessor's 

Dep't.... 92,167 94,000 1,833 

A u ditor's 

Dep't.... 15,650 15,900 250 

Board of 

H c alth, 

E v e r - 

g r e e n 

C em., 

Q u aran- 

tine Dpt. 

and 1877 

'78 fever 

h ospital , 

G a Hop's 

Island... 86,800 86.60® .... 200 

B o s t o n 

Harbor.. 5,000 4,506 .... 500 

Bridges... 53,293 58,00© 4.707 

Cedar 

Grove 

O e m . 5,000 5,00© 

C 1 li f- 1 1 ^ p *\ 

Bridge.. 115,000 .... .... 115,000 

Ches. Hill 

Drive- 

wav 3,500 5.000 1,500 

City Debt. 072,700 664,903 .... 7,797 
Citv Hos- 
pital 125,000 125,000 

City Reg. 

D e p art- 

ment.... 9,650 9.800 150 

Collector's 

De nart- 

ment.... 42,600 43,600 1,000 

C o m m on 

and Pub- 
lic Sq's.. 65,100 55,550 .... 9,550 
C o rarann- 

w e a lth- 

a v e n ue 

Fence... 6,000 .... .... 6,000 

C omple- 

tion W. 

O li tester 

Park, etc. 150,000 .... .... 150,000 

Continge't 

Funds... 13,000 11,500 .... 1,600 

County of 

•Suffolk.. 365,000 40O.000 35,000 

East Bos- 
tun fer- 
ries, in- 

cludi ng 

n'wboat 

1878-9.. 165,000 220,000 55,000 

Engineer's 

Dep't... 25,479 27,000 1,521 

Fencing 

& grad- 
ing ar'd 

Army <fe 

Navy 

Mon'm't .... 4.000 4,000 

Fire Dep't, 

fire al'm 

tel'g'ph, 

bells and 

clocks... 586,222 596,249 10,027 







Estimated. 








1877-78. 


1878-79. Increase. Decrease. 


Grading 










newst's. 




100,000 


100,000 


.... 


Health 










Dep't.... 
Incidental 


365,000 


364,650 




350 










expenses 


87,000 


85,000 


.... 


2,000 


Inspection 










of build- 










ings 

Intr st and 


14,000 


23,000 


9,000 













premium 


1,698,000 


1,619,000 




79,000 


Lamps 


490,000 


482,946 




7,054 


Law Dep't, 


18,440 


18,440 


. 


.... 


Markets.. 


9,295 


9,750 


455 


.... 


Mt. Hope 










Cem 'fry 


14,700 


19,500 


4,800 


.... 


New boiler 










h'se, jail 




10,000 


10,000 




New sch'l- 










house. .. 


86,500 


62,000 


.... 


24,500 


Old claims 


2,000 


2,000 




.... 


Overs 'rs of 










the poor 


141,400 


130,500 




10,900 


Bark Dep't, 




10,000 


10,000 




Paving cle- 










partm'nt 


850,000 


900,000 


50,000 




Police De- 










partm'nt 


841,300 


854,000 


12,700 




Printing & 










stat'nery 


27,000 


25,000 




2,000 


Pub'c b'ths 


25,000 


23,000 


.... 


2,000 


* Public 










buildings 


83,850 


80,400 


.... 


3,450 


Public Institutions, viz. 








H ouse of 










Industry 


184,950 


186,100 


1,150 





House of 










Correc'n 


91,150 


93,650 


2,500 


.... 


Lunatic 










Hospit'l 


59,720 


53,200 




6,520 


Pauperex- 










penses.. 


80,600 


91,400 


10,800 





Steam'r J. 










P. Brad- 












18,170 


17,200 


.... 


970 


Office ex- 










penses.. 


7,350 


8,300 


950 




Marcella- 










st. Home 


25,000 


27,500 


2,500 




Almsh'se, 










Austin 










Farm.... 


18,000 


14,000 


.... 


4,000 


Almsh'se, 










Charles- 










to'n Dis- 












9,000 


9,000 


.... 


.... 


Addition 










to o'l'dg 










Rainsf'd 










Island... 


16,000 


.... 


.... 


16,000 


New pig- 










gery, D'r 










Island... 


8,500 




.... 


8,500 


Stone cut- 










ting, D'r 










& Rains- 










ford Isls. 


.... 


25,000 


25,000 


.... 


Barn.R'ns- 










f 'd Pslnd 


.... 


2,000 


2,000 


.... 


Coal sheds, 










Rainsf'd 










Island. .. 


.... 


800 


800 




Public 










Lands... 


«,000 


5,500 


.... 


500 


Public Li- 










brary . . . 


120,126 


123,000 


2,874 


.... 


Regist ra - 










tion of 










Vo t e r s 










' aid Elec- 










tion Ex- 










penses.. . 


22,200 


25,600 


3,400 




Reser v e d 










Fund.... 


300,000 


300,000 


.... 




Salaries... 


31,950 


32.500 


550 





Schools 










& School 










houses, 










viz.— 










School In- 










structors 


1.115,520 


1,161,864 


46,344 





School Ex- 










pen s e s , 










School 










Commit - 












245,000 


271,000 


26,000 




Salaries of 










Officers 










t' c h o o 1 










Commit - 












51,000 


56,700 


5,700 


.... 


Schccol- 










houses, 










Public 










Mnildi'gs 


133.000 


123,000 


• • 


10.000 


Sealer of 










Weights 










•V Meas- 










ures. .. 


3.700 


5,800 


2,100 





10() 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



Estimated. 
1877-78. 1878-79. Increase. Decrease. 
Sewer De- 
parting. 150,000 15(1.000 
Sinking 

!•' D u d 
Commis- 
sioners.. 800 800 

Surveyor's 
Depa rt- 
ment S6.176 35,700 476 

Treas'er's 
D e p art- 
ment.... 21,700 'J2. 700 l.ooo 

West Bos- 
ton and 
other 
Bridges. 6,500 7,000 500 

Widen! n g 
Streets.. 125,000 125,000 

#10,267,258 #10.250.702 #461,111 #471,667 

•Amount for Architect's Department included in 
this appropriation, 1877-78. 

The following table shows the estimated income 
lor 1877-78 compared with that for 1878-79, with the 
increase and decrease in each : 

Estimated Estimated In- De- 

1877-78. 1878-79. crease crease. 

Armories.. #14,00o #9,500 .... #4.5oo 

Board of 
Health 
& Quar- 
antine... 12,000 12.(io(i 

Bridges.... l,4oo 1,400 

Citv Hos- 
pital 5,000 8,000 3,000 

C o r p o ra- 
tion Tax 300,000 275,000 .... 25,000 

County of 
Suffolk.. lOO.OiKi 100,(i(Ki 

East Bos- 
ton Fer- 
ries 170.0(10 176.000 5,000 

Fees 6.200 6.2O0 

Fire De- 
partment 2,000 2,500 500 

Health De- 
partment 42,000 33.00H .... 9,('iiii 

Interest... 175,000 145.000 .... 80,000 

On t stand- 
ingTaxes 500,000 126,000 .... 76,000 

Overseers 
of the 
Poor... . 30,000 88,800 3,800 

Paving I >i- 
partment 40,( 30,000 .... 10,000 

Police De- 
partment 7.50(1 7,000 500 

Printing... 5(> 50 

Public In- 
stitution* 38,001' 78,000 40.000 600 

Public Li- 
brary.... 3,000 2,600 

Rents'. 120.1 Kii ) 123,000 8,000 

Schools.... 19.000 lO.ooo 

Sewer De- 
partment 50,0oo 30 .<■■ .... 20,000 

Tax and 
o t li e l 
fees 82,000 30,000 .... 2.000 

Unclaimed 
drafts... 2.000 2,000 

#1,669.100 #1,547.950 #55,350 #176.5' 10 
Excess of 

liquor li- 

c e n te 

revenue 

previous 

financial 

year ... 125,000 184,000 60,000 

Excess ot 

actual , 

income 

A taxes 

over >■?- 

tima t e d 

inco me 

.V taxes 

previous 

financial 

year 75,0oo 60,000 .... 25.000 

Unexpend- 
ed bal- 
ances ot 

appropri- 
ations 

previous 

financial 

year 500,000 500,000 

Totals #2,369,100 #2,281,950 #114,350 #201.500 

Total decrease of estimated appropriations 

for 1 878-79 #471 .067 

Total increase of estimated appropriations 

for 1878-79 461.111 

Net decrease of estimated appropriations 
for 1 878-78 #10.556 



Income. 

Estimated income 1877 78 62,869,100 

1S78 79...-. 2,281,950 

Decrease of income L878 79 #87.150 

Percentage <>f Taxes. 
:; per cent, on amount required (7.974,752 1 

in 1878 -79 8289,248 

3 per cent, on amount required (7,898,158i 

in 1877-78 236,945 

Increase in 1878-79 #2.298 

Recapitulation. 

Net decrease of income in 1878-79 #87,160 

Net increase of percentage in 1878 79 2,297 

#89,447 
Net decrease of appropriations 1878 79 10,556 

Increase of the amount to be taxed, as stated 

on page 4 #78,891 



The accompanying communications, which I 
have received I10111 the Bevera] boards, depart- 
ments and committees) gives the details of the ap- 
propriations which they require. 
All of winch is respectfully submitted. 

Alfred T. Tubkeb, 
Auditor of Accounts. 

\1 DITOa'S ESTIMATES, 1878-79— EXPENDITURES. 
An estimate of the amount of money which will 
be required to defray the expenditures of the city 
id Boston ana the county ot Suffolk for the finan- 
cial year 1878-79. commencing with the 1st day ot 
May, 1878, and ending with the 30th day of April. 
1879. 

Citv of Boston, 

Advertising -For subscription and adver- 
tising in dally and weeklj newspapers 

in the citv not chargeable to other ap- 
propriations 81,600 00 

Architect's Department— For the sala- 
ries of the architect and employes, and 
all expenses of carrying on the Archi- 
tect's Depart 11 icnt 15,001 1.00 

Armories— for lent anil repair of anno 

riis. gas. etc . provided tor volunteer 
militia, as required bj the acts of 1*74, 
chapter 320, suction 83. and for inci- 
dental expenses and encouragement of 

the militia 20,000.00 

The amount paid out for rent of ar- 
mories is partlv reimbursed by the 
State. 

Assessors' Department -Salaries of Prin- 
cipal. Kirs! and Second Assistant 
Assessors, and clerks. printing, 
stationery, advertising, and all other 

expenses incurred in assessing the an 

nual tax 'U 

Auditor's Department— For salary of tin- 
Auditor, clerk hire, printing, station- 
ery, postage stamps, and all aecessan 
expenses for carrying on the Audi- 
tor of Accounts' department. The 
amount to be paid by the Auditor to 
Ills clerks shall lie in monthly instal- 
ments on a pav-roll certified to hv the 
Auditor of Accounts 16,90 

Board of Health, etc.— Salaries of the 

Board ot Commissioners, clerk and 

einploves. and all expenses incurred 
iid board under authority of the 
ordinance relating to heaith. including 
care of burial grounds and Evergreen 
Cemetery; salaries of Port Physician 
and assistant, captain, engineer of 
propeller, deck hands and labor; board 
and subsistence, fuel, nnrsesand keep 
ere, furniture, medicine, tools, print- 
ing, repairs on building and boat, and 

all other expenses of quarantine de- 
partment- 
Board of Healtn #67,800.00 

Evergreen Cemetery 1 ,200.00 

Ouarantine Department 17. 600. 00 

86.600.00 

Boston Harbor— For cost of manning 
and repairs of the Harbor Masters 
boat, and other contingent expenses of 
that department, which includes the 
keeping 'he harbor free of ice and oth- 
er obstructions, including the salary 

of the Harbor Master, etc 4,600.00 

Bridges -For repairs and maintenance 

of the bridges belonging to the city of 
Boston, as set forth in the requisition 

of the Committee on Bridges; also for 

the salaries of the several superintend- 
ents of said bridges 58.00o.00 

Cedar (irove Cemetery— For amount re- 
quired by the trustees for care and im- 
provement of the cemetery over and 
above their income . 5,000.00 

Chestnut Hill Driveway— Care and main- 
tenance of this roadway 5.000.00 



MARCH 7, 1878. 



101 



City Debt— For amount required to be 
taxed for payment to the Board of 
Commissioners on the Sinking Funds, 
Dec. 1, 1878. to meet the requirements 
of chapter 209, acts of 1875, entitled 
an act to regulate and limit municipal 
indebtedness, and section 2 of the 
ordinance on finance of 1877 

City Hospital— For the current expenses 
of carrying on this institution 

City Registrar's Department — b'or cost 
of registration of births, marriages and 
deaths, and other contingent expenses 
of the City Registrar's Department, in- 
cluding the salaries of the City Regis- 
trar and clerks 

Cochituate Water Works— The amount 
of expenditures for carrying on, main- 
taining and extending the Cochituate 
Water Works, including the salaries 
of officers and pay of laborers, being 
the same amount' as estimated by the 
Boston Water Board i §285,900). 'And 
the interest on tl,e Cochituate Water 
Loans and cost of the works, and pre- 
mium and exchange with which part 
of said interest is paid (#760,000), to 
be defrayed from the revenue re- 
ceived from said works, and all excess 
of revenue, if any, over said payments 
to be paid to trie Board of Commis- 
sioners on the Sinking Funds for the 
special redemption of saio loans. 

Collector's Department— For salaries of 
Collector. Deputy Collectors and clerks, 
stationery, printing, postage stamps 
and other expenses of this department 
not chargeable to revenue derived 
from costs on taxes and other assess- 
ments, and advertising the same. The 
amount to be paid by the Collector to 
his clerks and deputies shall be in 
monthly instalments, through the of- 
fice of the Auditor of Accounts, on a 
pay roll certified to by said Collector. . 

Common. Public Squares, etc. — For care 
and improvement of the Common. 
Public Garden and public squares of 
the city, including care of the trees on 
the streets, the salary of the Superin- 
tendent and pay of trie laborers 

Contingent Fund's— For the expenses of 
the joint standing and special com- 
mittees of the City Council, not having 
charge of any appropriations of money, 
incurred by said committees while in 
toe discharge of their official duties, 
the bills for the same to be audited and 
allowed for payment by the Auditor of 
Accounts upon their first being ap- 
proved by the Mayor, Chairman of the 
Board of Aldermen and the President 
of the Common Council $4,000.00 

For the contingent expenses of 
the Mayor, the bills for which 
the Auditor of Accounts is au- 
thorized to audit and allow 
for payment upon their being 
approved by the Mayor 1,560.00 

For the contingent expenses of 
the Board of Aldermen, to be 
expended in such manner as 
the Board of Aldermen shall 
order, and the Auditor of Ac- 
counts is authorized to audit 
and allow for payment of bills 
so ordered, upon their being 
approved by the Mayor and 
Chairman of the Board of Al- 
dermen 3,000.00 

For the contingent expenses of 
Common Council, to be ex- 
pended in such manner as the 
Common Council shall order, 
and the Auditor of Accounts 
is authorized to audit and al- 
low for payment all bills so 
ordered, uyon their being ap- 
proved bv The Mayor and Pres- 
ident of the Common Council. 3,000.(10 



ment of the ferries between the city 

proper and East Boston $175,000.00 

New ferry boat 45.000.00 



Engineer's Department— For the ex- 
penses of the Civil Engineer's Depart- 
ment, including salary of City Engi- 
neer 

Fencing and Grading around Army and 
Navy Monument— For the cost of erect- 
ing an iron fence around the Army and 
Navy Monument on Monument Hill, 
Boston Common, and completing the 
grading of said hill 

Fire Department, etc.— For the payment 
of the salaries of the Board of Fire 
Commissioners and clerk, of the Chief 
and Assistant Engineers, cleTks. offi- 
cers and members of the Fire Depart- 



604,903.00 
125,000.00 



9,800.00 



43,600.00 



55,550,00 



11,500.00 

220,000.00 
27,000.00 

4,000.00 



rnent, and all other expenses of the 
department : 

For the salaries of Superintendent of 
the Telegraphic Fire Alarm, and as- 
sistants, and all expenses of operating 
and keeping the same in order: 

For repairing and taking care of pub- 
lic clocks, payment to the Cambridge 
Observatory, and ringing church bells 
to denote the hours of the day— 

Fire Department $573,449.00 

Fire Alarm Telegraph 19,400.00 

Bells and Clocks 3,400.00 

Grading New Streets- For[def raying the 
cost of gradidg and putting in order 
new streets laid out by the Board of 
Street Commissioners, "1878. to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the Su- 
perintendent of Streets 

Health Department- For the expense of 
sweeping and cleaning the streets, 
lanes and squares, collecting house 
offal, purchase and keeping of horses, 
construction and repair of carts, wag- 
ons, harnesses used by said depart- 
ment, etc.; also the salaries of the 
Superintendent and clerks, etc 

Incidental Expenses— For cost of all 
public celebrations, including the 
Fourth of July; entertaining distin- 
guished visitors and delegations from 
other city governments; rewards; le- 
gal expenses and judgments against 
the city for accidents; also other ex- 
penditures not provided for, or charga- 
ble under soins other head 

Inspection of Buildings— Salaries of the 
Inspector of Buildings, assistants and 
clerk, keeping horse, and expenses in- 
cidental to the carrying on of this de- 
partment 

Interest and Premium — For the i ayment 
of the interest on the city debt proper 
(exclusive of the water debt), and the 
interest on such temporary loans as 
may be needed during the year in an- 
ticipation of the taxes, including the 
premium on gold, in which a part of 

that on the city debt is paid 

[The interest on the water loans 
and debt is provided for under the 
heads of Cochituate and Mystic Water 
Works.] 

Lamps — For cost of gas. burning-fluid, 
gas fixtures, lamp posts, lanterns, horse- 
keeping and all other expenses of light- 
ing the city, including the salary of the 
Superintendent, clerk and employe's. . . 

Law Department — For salaries of the 
City Solicitor and Assistant City Solic 
itors, clerks, printing, stationery and 
postage stamps. The amount to be 
paid by the City Solicitor to his assist- 
ants and clerks shall be in monthly in- 
stalments, through the office of the 
Auditor of Accounts, on a pay roll cer- 
tified to by said City Solicitor 

Liquor License Expenses— The amount 
of expenditures for salaries of Commis- 
sioners, clerks, and all other expenses 
connected with the issuing of liquor li- 
censes, to be defrayed from the amount 
of fees received for licenses, all excess 
of revenue over expenditures to re- 
main in the treasury at the close of the 
financial year. April 30, 1870, subject 
to order of the City Council. 

Markets— For the contingent expenses 
of the market houses, such as fuel, gas. 
police, night watch, public scales and 
weigher, and all the expenses of the 
markets, including the salary of the 

Superintendent and deputy 

[The expenses of keeping the build- 
ings in repair are charged to Public 
Buildings.] 

Mt. Hope Cemetery— For tiie amount re- 
quired oy the trustees for care and im- 
provement of the cemetery, over and 
above their income 

Mystic Water Works— For the amount 
of expenditures for maintaining, ex- 
tending and carrying on the Mystic 
Water Works, including the salaries of 
officers, pay of laborers, as estimated 
by the Boston Water Board ($100,000). 
and the interest on the Mystic Water 
Loans ($69,580), to be defrayed from 
the revenue received from said works. 
and all excess, if any, of revenue over 
said payments tobe paid to the Sinking 
Fund for the special redemption of said 
loans. 

New Boiler House. .Tail — The cost ot 
erecting a new brick boiler house, and 
connecting same with jail building 

New SchoolhOUSeS — English 
High and Latin School build- 
ings; cost of iron roofs in 
place of wooden ones, as 
originally contemplated $3(UH><> in) 



596,249.00 



100,000.00 



364,650.00 



85,000.00 



23,000.00 



1,619,000.00 



482,946.00 



1S.440.00 



9,750.00 



19,500.00 



10,000.00 



102 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



For a brick primary school- 
house, six rooms, l'c ilk street. 
Charlestown District 80,000.00 

For fitting and furnishing new 
primary schoolhouse, Slier- 
win District a. 000.00 

old Claims— Fox the payment of such 
bills and accounts against the city as 

have been audited and allowed in tor 
mer years, but which, not having been 

called for in those years, must be re- 
provided for in this appropriation bill, 
as at the close of every financial year 
all unexpended appropriations re- 
maining In the Treasury are used to 
reduce taxation the next' year 

Overseers of the Poor— For the gross es- 
timated expenditures of this board 

[All the income for the support of 
the poor of other cities and towns for 
the burial of the State's poor, is paid 
into the City Treasury. 

Park Department For clerk hire and 
assistance, engineering and surveying 
expenses, printing, stationery, maps, 
plans, etc 

Paving Department For the expense of 
paving, grading and repairing streets, 
etc., including the salary Of the Super- 
intendent, clerks, and pay of all the 
employee In his department 

Police Department -For the general ex- 
penses of the Police Department, in- 
cluding the salaries of the Chief and 
deputy, captains, lieutenants, sot 
geants. and patrolmen . also, maintain- 
ing the steamboat Protector; all In- 
come of the department being paid 
Into the City Treasury 

Printing and Stationery For the print- 
ing, binding, blank books, stationery. 

etc., required by the City Council, and 
in \ arious public offices, not < hargeable 

to some other appropriation 

Public Baths— For the expenses of car 

lying on the public bathing establish- 
ments during the summer months 

Public Buildings— For the ordinary re- 
pairs on the public buildings and 
wharves belonging to the city, exclu- 
sive of the Bchoolhouses, police sta- 
tions, engine houses, county build- 
ings, and Cilv Hospital, which arc 

otherwise provided for; also, for fuel, 

light, and liirnilure for the public 
Offices, City Hall, and cleaning of the 

same; aiso salaries of the Superintend- 
ent of Public Buildings, assistants, 

engineer and janitor ol City Hall, aud 
Superintendent of Faneuil Hall; also 

for alterations of buildings not other- 
wise provided tor 

Public Institutions For the gross ex- 
penditures required for carrying on 
the institutions in charge of the Board 
of Directors for Public Institutions, 
including the cost of running the 
steamboat .1. Putnam liradlee, and for 
the support Of criminal State paupers. 
etc. 

House of Industry 1186,100.00 

Hou>c of Correction 93,660.00 

Lunatic Hospital 58,200.00 

Support of criminal State 
paupers at State Reform 

School at Wes thorough. 
the state industrial School 
for Girls, and certain pris- 
oners in houses of correc- 
tion in other counties: also 
for support of pauper luna- 
tics in State lunatic hospi- 
tals, and for transportation 

of State paupers, etc 91,400.00 

Steamboat . I. Putnam Brad- 

lee 17,200.00 

Office expenses 8.300.1 Mi 

Marcella-street Home 27.600.00 

Almshouse. Austin Farm... 14,00011(1 
Almshouse, in Charlestown 

District 8,000.00 

Stone cutting. Deer and 

Rainsford islands 26,000.00 

Barn, Rainsford Island 2,000.00 

Coal sheds, Rainsford Island 800.00 

Public Lands Salary of the Superintend- 
ent, for grading of land belonging in 
the city, and other expenses of the Pub- 
lic Land Department 

[The proceeds from the sales ol the 

public lands are especially appropriated 

for the payment of the debt of the city.] 
Public Library— For the salaries of the 
Superintendent and assistants; for the 
purchase of books, cost of fuel, light, 
furniture, and other incidental ex- 
penditures for can \ ing on the library 

and Its branches 

Registration of Voters and Flection Ex- 
penses—For the cost of the reglstra- 



62.0O0.0i' 



2,000.0* 

130,500.00 



lO.oOO. on 

Doo.ooo.o* 

854,000.00 

26,000.00 

23,000.00 



SO. 400.00 



628,150.00 



6,600.00 



123,000.0* 



tion of.volers. preparing, printing and 
posting Of voting lists, salaries of ward 
Officers, Pay Of constables for notify- 
ing the inhabitants, and all other ex- 

c"iii ted With tl lections 25,600.00 

Reserved Fund— This amount to he re- 
served tor such purposes as the City 
Council may hereafter decide to appro- 
priate it. by transfer, for objects not 
Contemplated at the time ot making 
up the appropriation order, which are 
matters of taxation :;oo,000.0» 

Salaries For payment of the salaries of 
the Mayor. Mayor's Clerk, City Clerk, 
and clerk hire, Clerk of the Common 
Council and his clerk. Clerk ot Com- 
mittees and his assistant . Messenger 
and Assistant Messengers of the Cilv 
Council, etc 32.500. 00 

Schools and Schnolhouses -For the ex- 
penses of ail the schools, such as sala- 
ries, fuel, apparatus for warming and 
ventilating, ordinary repairs and rent 

of schoolhouses and rooms, furniture, 
school books and other hooks, print- 
ing, stationery, mans, philosophical and 
other apparatus, care of and cleaning 
houses, and other incidental expenses, 
as per estimates Of the Committee on 

Public Buildings and the School Com- 
mittee, viz.— 
school Instructors 01,161.864.00 

School expenses. Sol 1 

Committee 271,000.00 

Salaries of officers, School 

Committee 56,700.00 

Schoolhouses. in charge of 

Committee on Public 

Buildings 12:! 000.00 

1 012,564.00 
Sealer of Weights aud Measures -For 

all the expenses ot carrying on this 

department, including salaries of the 

Sealer and his assistants 6,800.00 

Sewers For constructing new sewers 

and repairing old ones, and all other 

expenses ol t his department . including 

safari ol Superintendent; all income 

from assessments on those liable to 
contribute to the Cost of tin- sewers 
being paid into the City Treasury 150,000.00 

Sinking Fund Commissioners -To meet 
the expenses 01 the Board of Commis- 
sioners on the sinking funds for the 
payment or redemption of the citj 
debt 800.00 

Surveyor's Department— For the ex- 
penses of the Surveyor's department, 
including the salary ol the Surveyor. 35. 700. 00 

Treasurers Department For salary of 
the City Treasurer clerk-hire, printing, 
stationery, postage stamps, and all 

necessary expenses for carrying on the 

Treasurer's department. The amount 
to he paid by the Treasurer to his 
clerks shall he' in monthly Instalments, 
through the Office Of the Auditor of Ac- 
counts, on a pay roll certified to by said 

Treasurer 22,700.00 

Boston -ind other Bridges -Salary 
of Commissioner, and one-half of the 

cost of the care and maintenance of 

W.st Boston, Cragie'S and Prison Point 

Bridges 7,000.00 

Widening and Extending Street*— For 
the expense Of small wideninSS and ex- 
tensions as it may he necessary to 
make during the financial year; also 
for the incidental expenses ami sala- 
ries of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners #75.000.00 

For unsettled Claims oi previous 

years 50,000.00 

— 125,000.00 

Total estimated expenditures on account 
of the city of Boston 89,856,702.00 

County of Suffolk: 

For the usual gross expenditures on 
county accounts, such as salaries oi the 

Sheriff, .lodges and Clerks of the sever- 
al Municipal District Courts. Assistant 
Clerks ot the Supreme Judicial and 
Superior Courts, officers of certain 
courts. Chaplain and officers of the 
.tail, Keeper of the County Court 

House. Registry of Deeds and Probate 
offices. Indices for the Registry of 

Heeds, arranging papers in Probate 

Office, fees of witnesses, Jurors.coro- 

ners and commissioners, -I udge of Pro- 
hate in insane cases; keeping in repair 
and furnishing the Court Houses, the 
Jail, the Registry of Deeds and the 
Probate Offices; also fuel, light, print- 
ing and stationery tor the County 
Courts and offices; supplies for the 
.1 ai I . e tc 400,000.00 

Total estimated expenditures ot the City 



M A K C H 



1878 



103 



of Boston and County of Suffolk for 

1878-79 $10,256,702.09 



Estimated expenditures, as stated 

above #10,256,702.00 

Estimated income 2,281,950.00 



Balance to be provided for #7,974,752.00 

To meet the sum of $7,974,752 in time 
for the service of the financial year 
will, in the opinion of the Auditor, re- 
quire a gross tax of $8,213,995.00 

From which deduct three per cent, of 
$7,974,752 for the amount of taxes 
which will not be paid in during the 
year, say 239,243.00 

We have the amount required, as stated 

above $7,974,752.00 

Alfred T. Turner, 

Auditor of Accounts. 
Auditor's Office, March 5, 1878. 
Incom e, 1878-79. 

Estimate of the income of the city of Boston 
and county of Suffolk for the financial year 1878- 
1879, commencing with the first day of May, 1878, 
and ending; with the thirtieth day of April, 1879: 

City of Boston. 

Armories — Amount receivable from the 
State for rent of armoriis furnished 
by the city for the volunteer militia, 
Acts of 1874, chapter 320, section 85, 
and 1877, char-ter 171 $9,500.00 

Board of Health, etc.— For cost of abate- 
ment of nuisances #8,000.00 

Quarantine— fees 4,000.00 



Bridges— From rents, etc 

City Hospital— Income from patients 

Corporation Tax — From the State of 
Massachusetts, the city of Boston's 
share of the corporation tax 

East Boston Ferries— From tolls 

Fees. etc. — From the City Clerk, for fees 
for recording mortgages of personal 
property, for licenses, and for use of 

Faneuil Hall $4,500.00 

From City Registrar, for cer- 
tificates of marriage inten- 
tions 1,700.00 



Fire Department— From sales of old ma- 
terials and manure 

Health Department — From the sale of 
house offal, street manure and ashes. . 

Interest— Receivable for interest on de- 
posits and taxes, etc 

Outstanding Taxes — Estimated amount 
receivable from outstanding taxes 

Overseers of the Poor— Collections by 
this board for support of the poor of 
other cities and towns in the State, 
and from State for the expenses of 
burying Slate paupers 

Paving Department— From sidewalk as- 
sessments, sale of old materials, etc. . . 

Police Department — From the 
Chief of Police, in reimburse- 
ments of the expenses of po- 
lice officers stationed at places 
of public amusement and oth- 
er places at the expense of 

the city #3,500.00 

Licenses for trucks, wagons 

and carriages 3,500.00 



12,000.00 
1,400.00 
8,000.00 



275,000.00 
175,000.00 



6,200.00 

2,500.00 

33,000.00 

145,000.00 

425,000.00 

33,800.00 
30,000.00 



Printing and St tionery— From sales of 
copies of Revised Ordinances 

Public Institutions— Income derivable 
from all sources 

Public Library— From the sale of cata- 
logues and tines collected 

Rents— Receivable for rents of the "Old 
State House," market houses and other 
city property 

Schools— From dog licenses, non-resi- 
dent pupils and other sources 

Sewers — From assessments for con- 
structing new sewers and for the right 
to enter old ones, etc 

Tax and other Fees— From fees received 
for collecting taxes and other assess- 
ments in the Collector's Department.. 

Unclaimed Drafts — Amount of hills 
against the city allowed and charged 
by the Auditor to their respective ap- 
propriations, but which will not be 
called for at the treasur\ office before 
the commencement of the next finaii- 
cial year, on and after May 1. 1879 



7,000.00 


50.00 


78,000.00 


2.500.00 


23,000.00 


19,000.00 


3n.000.00 


30.000.00 



2,000.00 



Liquor License Revenue — Estimated 
amount to be received from excess of 
receipts from liquor licenses over ex- 
penditures on account of the issuing of 
liquor licenses, for the financial year 
1877-78 



#1,447,950.00 



184,000.00 



Excess of Actual Income and Taxes- 
Estimated excess of actual over esti- 
mated income and taxes tor the finan- 
cial year 1877-78 50.000.00 

Unexpended Balances of Appropriations 
—Estimated amount of unexpended 
balances of appropriations for the 
financial year 1877-78 500,000.00 

Estimated income on account of the 
City of Boston for 1878-79 $2,181,950.00 

County of Suffolk. 

From fines, costs, fees, payable into the 

county treasury by the officers of the 

various courts, bv the sheriff of the 
■ county, etc 100,000.00 

Total estimated income on account of 
the Citv of Boston and County of 
Suffolk for 187S-79 $2,281,950.00 

Alfred T. Turner, 

Auditor of Accounts. 
Auditor's Office, March 5, 1S78. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS FROM THE HOARD OF 
ALDERMEN. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Reports of leave to withdraw on petitions, viz. : 

W. E. L. Dillaway, to be paid for personal in- 
juries from a fall in South street. 

John Raddin, to be paid for cushions for Steam 
Fire Engine 7. 

T. A. Splaine, for leave to place boats on Pub- 
lic Garden pond. 

Severally accepted in concurrence. 

MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE MECHANIC EXHI- 
BITION. 

A report came down with orders to permit the 
Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association 
to occupy the city lot at junction of Columbus 
avenue, Pleasant and Eliot streets, and the Ten- 
nyson-street schoolbouse, for their exhibition, on 
the terms and conditions therein set forth, and 
for temporary accommodations to be furnished 
the pupils of said school. 

Tlie question was upon giving the orders a sec- 
ond readiDg. 

Mr. Coe of Ward 23 moved to amend the second 
order by striking out all after the word "pur- 
pose," and inserting instead thereof the words, 
"the expense thereof to be assumed and paid In- 
said association."' 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— I trust the amend- 
ment will be carried. I had proposed to have 
this matter referred to the Committee on the Ju- 
diciary, to ascertain the legality of the city letting 
this schoolhouse. I understand from the Commit- 
tee on Public Buildings it will cost the city some 
three thousand dollars to provide for the schools: 
and under the decisions wo have had heretofore. 
it is clearly illegal for the city to expend money in 
this way. But with the amendment offered by'the 
gentleman from "Ward 23. 1 am willing to vote for 
the order. 

Mr. Burke of "Ward 2— I hope that amendment 
will not prevail. I think the members of the 
Council know that the city of Boston used to con- 
tribute much to the exhibitions of this association 
by giving them the use ot Faneuil Hall. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— No, never. 

Mr. Burke — I have been informed so this very 
evening. I would say that the committee were 
unanimous in their report, and if there is any ob- 
jection to charging the expense to scboolho'uses, 
public buildings, it might be charged to inci- 
dental expenses. The gentleman from Ward 17 
informs me that the city did not give the associa- 
tion the use of Faneuil Hall: but I have bean in- 
formed on what I consider reliable authority that 
the city always gave them the use of Faneuil Hall. 
Mr. President, 1 think the city of Hos- 
ton ought to aid. in some measure, this 
association, for 1 believe that in years 
past, and up to the present time.it has been a 
benefit to the city : and 1 think there is no ques- 
tion but this coming exhibition will benefit the 
city of Boston quite as much as the citv will lose 
by the operation. I trust that some of the aen- 
tlemen will consider this a little further heTore 
we act upon it. and see the propriety of chargiug 
this to incidental expenses. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17—1 am informed by the 
Auditor that while the association have always 
had the use of Faneuil Hall, thev have always 
paid for Quincy Hall by an annual rental, and in 
it was the main part of their exhibit. The Citv 
Council cannot pass the^e orders legally; we have 
no right to take from the taxpayers the three 
thousand dollars necessary to provide accommo- 



lOJr 



< ! < >M M O N COUNCIL, 



datious for the schools. We ought not to pass 
orders which are illegal, and although I proposed 
to bring the question of its legality before the 
Council, yet I will not object to them with the 
gentleman's amendment proposing to have the 
expense paid by the association. 

Mr. Burke— f did understand that the associa- 
tion did lease (Juincy Hall from the city aud sub- 
let it to other parties with the understanding that 
they should have it once in three years tor their 
exhibitions: and I understand that they have had 
the use ot Faneuil Hall free. As to the'legality of 
the city giving the use of this schonlhouse free, it 
is a question 1 have not thought of, and it is 
strange that the committee should have over- 
looked it, as some ot the oldest members ot the 
City Council were upon the committee, and we bad 
quite a lengthy hearing. I think the city of Bos- 
ton should aid in this exhibition. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— There is no question 
but tbey had the use ot Faneuil Hall free, as no 
charge is made for it for any purpose. 
But this is a different case. The city b IS 
to spend .53000 to provide outside accom- 
modation for those schools during the ex- 
hibition. The city has no right to vote money to 
aid the exhibition, but I am willing the city 
should do all it can legally to aid the exhibition. 

Mr. Dantorthof Ward 10— I have no doubt the 
Charitable Mechanic Association is a very worthy 
institution; but it is a ri di one. At the hearing 
last year, the vice president ot the association tes- 
tified that they paid $.3000 to tenants to move 
from (>uincy Hall every time they bad a fair, and 
that they made $10,100 by their exhibition. Now, 
I think we should not give them this money, be- 
cause it is unnecessary. 

Mr. Burke— It will i>e readily seen that a good 
part of the time the association occupy the school- 
house will be during vacation ; and I fail to see 
how it will cost the city so large a sum. 

Mr. 1*06 of Ward 23— If we have no right to vote 
away the money ot the city for this purpose, it 
makes no difference whether it be five dollars or 
five thousand. This association proposes to hold 
the exhibition for the benefit of its own treasury, 
and I tail to see why we should vote the money of 
the taxpayers to provide temporary schoolhouses 
for the benefit of this association. 

Mr. Spenceley Of Ward l!i— I should be very glad 
to vote this sum of money for this association, but 
it will be quite impossible lor me to vote for it in 
the shape it is now. It provides that the Super- 
intendent of Public Buildings shall provide the 
schoolhouses. As this expenditure has not been 
provided for in the appropriation for the year, it 
will be quite impossible for the Superintendent ot 
Public Buildings to do it. If it is charged to in- 
cidental expenses, as the gentleman from Ward 1 
suggests, I should be happy to vote for it; but I 
cannot do so as the matternow stands. The sec- 
ond order provides that the building may be re- 
moved bv order of the City Council or the Board 
of Aldermen, and 1 don't understand the phrase- 
ology. I don't know why this phraseology was 
used, because the Board of Aldermen might vote 
to take it away and the Common Council might 
not concur. It seems to me that the words Board 
of Aldermen are superfluous, and that it ought to 
be subject to the action of the City Council. I 
move to amend by strikiug out the words "Board 
of Aldermen or," so that it will be by vote of the 
City Council. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— This is a very im- 
portant matter, and one that we ought to give 
more time to than we are iu a condition to do to- 
night. 1 hope it will lie over one week, aud there- 
fore move that it be laid upon the table. 

The orders were laid upon the table. 

Later in the session Mr. Spenceley offered an 
order— That the special committee to whom was 
referred the petition of the Massachusetts Char- 
itable Mechanic Association be requested to ob- 
tain from the City Solicitor his opinion in regard 
to the legality of the city paying the expense at- 
tending the removal of the schools from the Ten- 
nyson-street Primary Schoolhouse. Read twice 
and passed. Sent up. 

On motion of Mr. Spenceley the report and or- 
ders relating to the petition of the association 
were taken from the table and specially assigned 
foi next Thursday evening at half-past eight 
o'clock. 

COMMISSIONER <>K CAMBRIDGE BRIDGES. 

A certificate came down of the election of Fred- 
eric. W. Lincoln as Commissioner of Cambiidge 
Bridges. Placed on file, and an election was or- 



dered. Committee— Messrs. Lauten of Ward 14, 
Cox of Ward 15, and O'Connor of Ward 8. Fred- 
eric W. Lincoln received 57 votes, the whole num- 
ber cast, and was elected in concurrence. 

SECOND LS818TANT ASSESSORS, 

A certificate came down of the election of thirty- 
three Second Assistant Assessors. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 read a letter from Dud- 
ley R. Child declining on account of business en- 
gagements to serve as Second Assistant Assessor 
for Ward is, lor which he had been elected by the 
other branch, and Mr. Sampson said that in "cou- 
sultation with other members of the delegation 
from that ward he nael been requested to say tbey 
unanimously recommended the name of Christo- 
pher C. Ryder in place of Mr. Child. 

An election was ordered, and on motion of Ml". 
Richardson ot Ward 1(1 a committee of six was ap- 
pointed to receive and couut votes. 

Committee— Messrs Coe of Ward 23, Sampson 
ol Ward IS, Barry of Ward 22, Hill ot Waul 14, 
Plimpton of Ward 21 and Howland ot Ward 5. 

On motion of Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19 a recess 
was taken, at the eud of which the committee re- 
ported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 60 

Necessary to a choice 34 



Wards. 

1— *lsaiah W'hitten 66 

2-* Albert H. Taylor... 60 
'John Bryant «<> 

*D. D. Taylor ui 



Wards. 

14— "HoseaB. Bowen.,.59 
(ico. W. Kingman.. 6 
• I. T. Coughlln 1 

15— "Daniel J. Holland. .65 



5-*Dennis G. Quirk... 86 Hi— »W. W. Dromev <;<i 

6— t Michael D. Collins. 62 17— Thomas A. Tallon. .21 

♦John Carvln 56 Dudley R. Child 5 

John Fay ll +< 'hristo'r C. Ryder.34 

James L. l.iuigley... 24 118— ♦Samuel P. Oliver. .66 



7— tEdward J. Biley....35 

Samuel B.Krogman.31 

8— ♦Thos. J. Anderson. .54 

Martin Jennir.gs 10 

Thos. Gaffield f 

9— Walter Harmon 15 

•Frank Fuller 51 

10— ♦Wm. s. Whitney.. .66 
♦Increas e ED. Noj es. 66 

ll-Mohn R. Briggs....66 
Jarvls I). Braman. ..ll 
*. lames Standtsh. . . .55 

12— John -I. Murphy. ...33 

John Murphy 1 

•.i iiim Osborne. Jr. .47 

"Alfred I. Woodbury. 47 

13— Thomas Haney ..26 

"Dudley Pray 4i> 



19— t Francis E. llines 41 

Joanna Dyer 23 

C. ('. Kvder 2 

20— ♦Frederick II. Field.50 
Edward W. Dolan.,80 
♦Joseph W'liite. Jr. .44 

21— Matthew R. Walsh..20 

*(ieo. Warren 50 

•John ('.Cook 62 

Patrick II. Rogers. <i<; 

23— ♦Edward P. Butler. .66 
John F. Pavson... ,66 

'-'4 'Win. Withiugton. .66 
"Joseph E. Hall 66 

26— *Geo. W. Warren.. ..66 



" Elected in concurrence. 
t Elected in non-concurrence. 
Sent up. 
CONSOLIDATION OF HARBOR POLICE A M > HABBOR 
MASTER. 

On motion of Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19, the 
Council took up the special assignment lor nine 
o'clock, viz., Order to accept an act concerning 
the Harbor Master of Boston, chapter 04, acts 
1862. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17—1 am in favor of the 
report, but 1 understand that merchants large- 
ly interested in this matter have presented a 
petition to the City Council, which, by mistake, 
has gone to the Board of Aldermen, asking for a 
hearing on this matter; and I move that further 
consideration ot the subject be specially assigned 
to next Thursday evening, and that the commit- 
tee be authorized to give the petitioners a public 
hearing. 

The motion prevailed. 

UNFINISHED I'.lsl.MSS. 

Older lor Committee on Improved Sewerage to 
expend §14,775 for land taken and damages occa- 
sioned by extension of Hereford street. Passed 
iu concurrence. 

Order allowing the Directors of East Boston 
Ferries to contract for fuel for the next financial 
year. Passed in concurrence. 

Order to pay Hall & Whipple 92.30 for refresh- 
ments for Committee on Licenses of 1*77. I'assed. 
Sent up. 

Order to pay following bills: Heliotype Print- 
ing Company, for map of procession Sept. 17. and 
circular, §115.88; F. L. Gilman & Co., balance due 
on two historic monuments, $60.00; George J. 
Coyie, loam at monument in Boston Highlands, 
§34.50. Passed. Sent up. 

sAI.l. n] i ki:i:\ BOAT AND PUBCHABE OF M.« 
ONE. 

The orders to allow the Directors of East Bos- 
ton Ferries to purchase a new boat and sell the 
old boat General Grant, the cost of said uew boat 



MARCH 7 , 1878 



1U5 



not to exceed $45,000, were considered under un- 
finished business. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10— I would like to ask 
the Council to allow that order to remain another 
week before acting upon it. I am not prepared 
at this time to state some facts in relation to it 
as I should like to do; but it is possible that in- 
formation can be obtained from some other 
source. I do not do this for the purpose of op- 
posing it; but I understand from the committee 
there is no particular haste about it, and there- 
fore I move that the order lie upon the table for 
the time being. 

The order was laid upon the table. 

auditor's monthly exhibit. 
The Auditor's exhibit for March 1 was received. 
Sent up. Appropriations, $16,337,415.16; expend- 
ed, $12,778,163.54; balance unexpended, $3,559,- 
251.62. 

THE AVENUES TO THE EAST BOSTON FERRIES. 

The following was received : 

The Street Commissioners respectfully return 
herewith the report and order referred to them by 
your honorable body, requesting them to lay out 
as public ways the avenues making the ap- 
proaches to the East Boston ferries from Com- 
mercial street on the city side, and from Sumner 
street in East Boston. A petition irom a number 
of citizens was presented a year ago to the com- 
missioners, askiog for the acceptance of these 
streets by the city. Subsequently the commis- 
sioners met with the ferry directors and with 
others interested, and upon representations made 
to them have caused surveys and plans of the 
streets prepared. The ownership of "them having 
been found to be in the city, subject to the rights 
of the abutters in certain 6t them, and as they are 
in charge of the especial employment of the city 
through the Department of Ferries ; the commis- 
sioners cannot undertake to transfer these streets 
unreservedly to the public without the explicit 
request of the City Council that they should be 
so. The commissioners therefore await your de- 
cision upon the order herewith returned to you 
before acting in the premises. 

By order of the City Commissioners, 

J. H. Jenkins, Clerk. 

The report was accepted, and 'he order referred 
to therein, requesting the Street Commissioners 
tojlay out the aforesaid avenues as public streets, 
was read a second time and passed. Sent up. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

A petition was received from Mary Troy to be 
paid for personal injuries caused by a fall in 
Pembroke street. Referred to Committee on 
Claims. 

Mr. Richardson of Ward 10 presented the peti- 
tion of Thomas C. Vales for repayment of money 
paid for a void tax title. Referred to Committee 
on Claims. 

Severally sent up. 

ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATION FOR SCHOOL COM- 
MITTEE AND ANNUAL TRANSFERS. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17 submitted the follow- 
ing: 

The Committee on Finance, to whom was re- 
ferred the request of the School Board for an 
additional appropriation of $51,450, respectfully 
report as follows : It was the policy of the City 
Council last year to insist upon the substantial 
reduction of salaries in every department. The 
amount then asked for by the School Board for 
salaries of instructors was $1,211,150. The aver- 
age reduction of salaries in other departments 
of the City Government on the first day ot 
May (the commencement of the financial 
year) amounted to more than ten per 
cent.; but the employes in the Public School De- 
partment were engaged in a virtual contract till 
Sept. 1. Secondly — Their salaries were not re- 
duced till that time. In view of this fact, the 
Committee on Public Instruction recommended 
the reduction of only $95,630, or less than eight 
per cent. The amount asked by the School Board 
for officers' salaries was $57,350, of which a reduc- 
tion was recommended by the Committee on Pub- 
lic Instruction of $6350. The appropriations as 
reduced by this committee and passed by the City 
Council were — 

For salaries of instructors 81,115,520 

For salaries of officers 51,000 

Although the amount asked for by them for 
officers' salaries was only cut down $6350, the 
School Board now report a deficiency of $7125, 
making a total expenditure of $775 more than the 



sum tor which they originally asked. In the 
opinion ot your committee, the original appropri- 
ations for salaries, both ot officers and instructors, 
were liberal in comparison with salaries paid in 
the other departments of our citv. We consider, 
therefore, that the action of the School Board 
in establishing salaries upon a basis which 
would be sure to create a large deficiency, 
was unjustifiable. It appears, however, that the 
School Board has authority to establish salaries 
for their officers and instructors, and the City 
Council has simply the choice of appropriating 
the required amount or ordering the schools to be 
closed when the original appropriation is ex- 
hausted. As your committee are not prepared to 
favor the latter alternative they would recom- 
mend the passage of the following order. Your 
committee also report the annual order authoriz- 
ing the necessary transfers of appropriations to 
be made by the Auditor of Accounts, in closing 
the present financial year, with the approval of 
the Committee on Finance : 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Account* be and 
he hereby is authorized to transfer from the Re- 
serve Fund to the appropriation lor School In- 
structors the sum of $44,325, and to the appropri- 
ation for Salaries of Officers of the School Com- 
mittee the sum of $7125. 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be and 
he is hereby authorized to make such transfers of 
appropriations as are required to make up the de- 
ficiencies in other appropriations, and such others 
as may be necessary in closing the business of the 
financial year, which terminates April 30, 1878; 
all such transfers to be reported to the Committee 
on Finance for ratification and approval. 

The orders were severally passed to a second 
reading and laid over. 

THE BATHING DEPARTMENT. 

Under unfinished business, the Council consid- 
ered the motion to refer to the Committee on 
Bathing the order to consider the expediency of 
placing the Public Bathing Department in charge 
of the Board of Health. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24— I offer an amendment 
that in place of the Committee on Bathing it be 
referred to the Joint Committee on Health. 

Mr. Pearl of Ward 1— I hope it will not be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Health. As I said be- 
fore, I think the proper committee is the Commit- 
tee on Bathing, who ought to understand this 
matter better than any other committee in the 
City Council. 1 hope it will not be referred. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24—1 was in hopes this or- 
der would have been referred to the Committee 
on Ordinances; but as the Council have seen fit 
not to so refer it, and as we have heard from the 
Committee on Bathing, and as from the statement 
of the chairman of that committee I feel confi- 
dent we shall not hear anything from the commit- 
tee, I trust ic will be referred to the Committee on 
Health. They will report whether it is desirable 
to make the change or not. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— The gentleman who 
has just sat down has certainly made a very broad 
statement in saying that if it is referred to the 
Committee on Bathing we shall not hear anything 
from them. If he would look at his manual he 
would see that a report can be called for within 
four weeks. I hope it will be referred to the 
Committee on Bathing, for there is no reason why 
they should not report upon this matter. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— 1 trust this will not 
be referred to the Committee on Bathing. It 
seems to me it would be highly improper. They 
are the committee trom whom tnis is to be taken. 
We all know that this committee is one from 
which more political influence emanates than 
from any other, and that the Presidents ot this 
Council, fiom year to year, have had more press- 
uieto be appointed upon that committee than 
upon any other, for the political iufiuence that 
emanates 'rom it. The proper reference would 
be to the Committee on Ordinances, but I hope it 
will be referred to the Committee on Health 
rather than to the Committee on Bathiug. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24— The chairman of the 
Committee on Bathing has already expressed his 
views and expressed them stronglv, and he thinks 
his committee cau take charge of it better than 
any other, and he thinks it can be carried on more 
cheaply by them than by any other department, as 
this statement comes from the chairman of the 
committee, we may naturally conclude that that is 
the opinion of the Committee on Bathing. Now. il 
we refer it to the Committee on Health we shall 
get an opinion from them that is not biased at 
all. This is a part ot the business ot the Commit- 



1()6 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



tee on Bathing, and tbey ieel tbat it would be tak- 
ing away their business from them, and we might 
nor get just such a report from them as we might 
wish to Dave. I think we should get a more un- 
biased report from the Committee on Health. 

Mr. Burke o( Ward 2—1 hardly understand this 
question, but it seems to me a little strange to 
hear the statement from the gentleman trom 
Ward 17. It is the old story ot political influence. 
1 don't know of any way that the Committee on 
Bathing could use their offices for political influ- 
ence any more than any other committee of the 
City Government. In fact, this whole City Gov- 
ernment is a political body, the wa> 1 view it, and 
I think there are very lew men in City Halibut 
who owe their offices to political influence and 
power. I think that tins is hardly a lair charge 
against the Committee on Bathing. TbP same 
question was raised about allowing the Second 
Assistant Assessors to be elected by this body, 
because it gave too much political powei to cer- 
tain men. Hut it we placed them in charge of the 
Principal Assessors we would put the same power 
in the hands of a tew men. Now, if the Commit- 
tee on Bathing have a little political power by 
this office, and it is proposed to turn the depart- 
ment over to the Board of Health, we will thereby 
give that power to three men. 1 hope the order 
will lie over until we can investigate it a little 
more. 

Mr. Sampson ol Ward 17- 1 hardly think the 
gentleman from Ward 2 expresses Ins" honest sen- 
timents, because he has been here long enough to 
know. He must know that this committee have 
the appointments of men to take charge of the 
bath houses, and wield political influence, and 
that the Presidents of the Council have been se- 
verely pressed by members of the Common Coun- 
cil to get appointed upon that committee, for the 
sakeot wielding this political power. Whether it is 
rightfully wielded or not is not the question before 
as. This order only contemplates that the com- 
mittee shall consider the expediency of the trans- 
fer. When their report comes in the question of 
tlfe transfer will come before us. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward * -The statement made 
by the gentleman from Ward 17, that members 
want to get. upon this committee for the sake of 
the political influence they can wield, is a remark- 
able one. Vet tuey want to refer it to the Commit- 
tee on Health, who have seventeen times the pat- 
ronage that the Committee on Bathing has. They 
control one of the largest departments in the city 
of Boston and employ more men. 

Mr. Sampson of ward IT— Do the members of 
the Committee on Health employ the men? 

Mr. Mctiaragle— They have the* recommendation 
of them, tiie same as the Committee on Bathing 
have. That department employs ladies— 1 don't 
know whether it is controlled by ladies or not; 
but that is the part I would like to control myself 
—and it is no sign that they use it as a political 
machine. The Committee on Health have the 
largest political influence of anv department in 
City Hall. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward 24— Leaving out the politi- 
cal question— which I don't think ought to come 
in here at all — but faking the question of the ex- 
pense, we all know that the public, baths are car- 
ried on at a great expense. 1 think that tbey can 
be carried on at a great deal less expense, and 
that the Board ol Health can reduce the expense 
considerably. I think the Board of Health re- 
duced certain expenses connected with that de- 
partment some years ago, and if they had the 
handling of this department they might also re- 
duce this departments expenses. 

Mr. Pearl of Ward 1 — In regard to the exnense, 
1 should like to know what committee or depart- 
ment could make a better showing than the Com- 
mittee on Bathing. In 1863 it cost the same num- 
ber of people $36,000, and this year all we ask for 
is $23,000. In that time the appropriation has been 
cut down about forty per cent. If there is any 
department that can make a better showing I 
should like to see it. 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— It seems to me we are 
arguing the expediency ot making the change. 
Now, the question is, what committee shall we re- 
fer this to to consider the expediency of making 
the change? It seems to me it would be rather 
absurd to refer it to a committee who are one of 
the parties to the case. We ought to find an im- 
partial tribunal who will ascertain and report to 
the City Council the reasons for a change, if there 
are any. 

Mr. Mctiaragle— I would ask what difference 
there is between this committee and the Commit- 



tee on Common and Squares. Hid they not come 
in here and report on about the same subject- 
that the Common and Public Crounds be placed 
in charge ot the Park Commissioners? They were 
willing that their power should he taken from 
them. What is the difference between the two 
committees? 

Mr. Crocker— The gentleman seems to think 
that because one committee has been magnani- 
mous enough to report in favor of doing away 
with its power, all other committees would do so. 
I think it is probably an exceptional case. I think 
that this and all such matters ought ordinarily to 
he referred to some impartial tribunal who "will 
consider whether there should he any change, and 
report to the Council the reasons why there should 
he any change, and the Council can consider 
them. Here is a certain committee— I don't know 
who the members are, except the gentleman who, 
1 understand, is chairman— who wield a good deal 
of power and patronage; and it seems to me to be 
absurd to refer to them the question wheth- 
er that power and patronage should be 
taken away from them. The chairman is 
outspoken in the belief that that is one of the fin- 
est committees in City Hall, and that thev are do- 
ing everything wonderfully correct and in a very 
desirable manner. That may be true: but if we 
want to find out whether it is, we don't want to 
refer it to the committee who say it is all very 
beautiful. We want to refer it to some commit- 
tee who will report the facts on both sides. I 
hope we shall refer it to some other committee! I 
think it might be referred to a special commit- 
tee. 

Mr. Hosnosky of Ward 16— If in order. I would 
move to amend by striking out the "Board of 
Health'' and inserting the "Park Commission- 
ers.'' 

The Piesident— The Chair thinks that would not 
be in order. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 24 moved that the vote be 
taken by yeas and nays. 

Mr. Burke ol Ward 22— If 1 thought there was 
any necessity for making this change. I might not 
oppose the motion of the gentleman from Ward 
9; but, no charges have been made against the 
committee for incapacity to perform the duty as- 
signed them ; theretore, I think there ought to be 
some charges before the inquiry is made. Speak- 
ing about the employ.-, I suppose those places 
have got to be filled by somebody. 1 suppose, 
while we have bathing houses, that we should 
have proper persons to look after them 
in the summer season and to take care 
ot them in the winter time. Now, the 
question seems to be whether these gen- 
tlemen are using their power iu a proper manner 
or not. and whether they are using their patronage 
for their own interest 01 in the interest of the 
city. I have no doubt that the committee are 
using their power for the interest of the city, and 
until I hear some definite charges made, I see no 
reason for a change. If the department is put 
under the Board of Health, it is evident tbat tbey 
will make the appointments now made by the 
committee. It will only be a question as to whose 
friends will get the places. Now, I will say that I 
have just as much confidence in the honesty of 
the members of this Council as I have in the men 
who are the heads of departments in this Citv 
Hall. 

Mr. Spenceley of Ward 19—1 feel a good deal as 
the man did who was writing a letter. He put a 
■•P. S." down at the bottom, "If you don't get this 
letter, go and see who has got it." Now, it seems 
to me that after the suggestion of the gentleman 
trom Ward IT as to this political chicanery going 
on, we ought to find it out. But I am "not in 
favor of referring this to the Committee on 
Bathing, as that would be like asking a man 
whether he should be hanged or not. I don't 
know about referring it to the Committee ou 
Health, and therefore I move that it be laid on 
the table until such time as we can find out what 
is the proper committee to refer it to. 

The order was laid on the table. 

»\i..\liir> OF BMPLOYBS in 1111: PI BXIC INSTITU- 
TIONS. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward IT— In years past it has 
been the understanding of the City Council that 
the Board of Directors for Public Institutions 
have bad the fixing of the salaries of their em- 
ployes. Last year the Committee on Retrench- 
ment undertook to fix its salaries, and on July 2, 
I think, the City Council passed an order request- 
ing the opinion ol the City Solicitor as to the right 



MARCH 



18 78. 



107 



of the CittfcCouncil to fix the salaries of those em- 
ployes. Wiat opinion was not given during the 
year, and an order was introduced here in 
January last asking for the opinion of 
•the City Solicitor upon the same subject. 
Up to the present time no communication 
from tbe City Solicitor has been received by this 
body. I understand that the Committee on Sala- 
ries are at work arranging salaries for the coming 
year, and as the Directors for Public Institutions 
are anxious to have this matter settled, as there 
are various statutes which give them the power 
to fix the salaries of certain officers, it has been 
suggested that the matter might be settled by 
striking out the following paragraph from page 
478 of the ordinance: 

- "Provided, however, that the compensation of 
all persons employed shall be subject to the con- 
trol of the City Council." 

This will leave the matter just as it has been, 
with the Board of Directors and not the City Coun- 
cil. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 want to hear some 
good reason for it. By the kindness of the Presi- 
dent I was placed upon the Committee on Salaries. 
Now, sir, I do not know but the Directors for Pub- 
lic Institutions may know what their employes are 
worth better than I do; but I don't propose to 
have this power taken out of my hands without I 
know something about it. 1 am not authorized to 
speak for the Committee on Salaries, and I don't 
want to speak for them until they make their re- 
port; but if they are not competent to hx the sal- 
aries of city employes they are not competent to 
be upon the committee. The committee have not 
yet made any report or fixed any salaries. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17—1 would like to ask 
the gentleman from Ward 8 what a nurse for a 
lunatic hospital ought to be paid, and what the 
clerk in one of the institutions ought to be paid; 
and whether the gentlemen elected to this City 
Council are more competent to fix the salaries of 
school teachers than the school board are ? By law, 
the directors have a right to fix certain salaries, 
and this amendment is to define their powers. 
The City Council never tried to fix the salaries of 
the employes of the public institutions before last 
year* 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 don't stand up 
here to put my humble opinion before that of the 
Board of Directors. What I object to is the gen- 
tleman standing up here and forestalling the re- 
port of the Committee on Salaries. He don't 
know what they will report. It is an injustice to 
them to forestall their report. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17— My object is not to 
forestall the action of the committee. I don't 
know how they are likely to act. The City So- 
licitor has not sent any opinion here. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5— It is not that the directors 
want to forestall the report of the Committee on 
Salaries ; it was the City Council of last year that 
forestalled the action of the directors. Now.it 
seems to me that this order is about right. Last 
year I voted for the report of the Committee on 
Retrenchment. I knew no more about the sala- 
ries of the employes of the Directors for Public In- 
stitutions than I did about any other; but it 
was the report of a full committee, and after 
talking with some members of the committee I 
find that they knew more about it than I did. It 
seems to me that the directors know what the 
duties of their officers are, and after serving a 
month on that board I find that they are an 
economical set of men and scrutinize their em- 
ployes. I hope the order will pass. 

Mr. McDonald of Ward 12—1 rise to a point of 
order. The joint rules say— 

"All by-laws passed by the City Council shall be 
termed ordinances, and the enacting style shall 
be, 'Be it ordained by the Alderman and Common 
Council of the city of Boston in City Council as- 
sembled.' No order or vote which, if passed, 
would have the effect to amend, suspend or re- 
peal an ordinance, shall be entertained in either 
branch of the City Council, unless it is in the form 
of an ordinance." 

Now, sir, according to that, I think that the or- 
dinance offered by the gentleman from Ward 17 
must be out of order. 

Mr. Sibley— Mr. Healy has stated over and over 
again that an order passed by the City Council 
and signed by the Mayor does repeal an ordi- 
nance. 

Mr. Barry— This seems to be a question of so 
much magnitude that the City Solicitor has been 
considering it some eight months and has not 



yet rendered a decision, that I do not think the 
average member of the City Council has a right- 
Mr. McDonald— I would like the ruling of the 
Chair upon my point of order. 

The President— The Chair thinks it should be in ^ 
the form of an ordinance. 

Mr. Sampson of Ward 17—1 would move to 
amend by inserting at the beginning the usual 
enacting clause, and I also move that it be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Ordinances. 

Mr. Burke of Ward 2—1 desire to say a word 
upon this before it is disposed of in order to be 
consistent with my action last year. I shall advo- 
cate the passage of this order. At the time the 
Retrenchment Committee reported last year I ad- 
vocated the taking of the fixing of the salaries 
out of the hands of all the departments, not only 
the Directors for Public Institutions, but all 
others. But I believe that where directors are 
established and have entire management of the 
departments, they ought to know the value of 
their employes, and in some cases I should be 
willing to leave it in the hands of the committees. 
I have no idea that the directors will pay exorbi- 
tant prices, but I think they will pay regular 
prices, 1 know that in some cases last year the 
reductions made were very unjust and unfair and 
ought not to have been made. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8— Speaking for myself, 
and not for the Committee on Salaries, I dou't op- 
pose this order. I don't favor touchiug any of 
these salaries; but suppose we should vote an en- 
tire sum for the salaries of the department. I am 
afraid that under that order the directors would 
feel authorized to go beyond that sum. 

The subject was referred to the Committee on 
Ordinances. Sent up. 

ALLOWANCE FOR A DISABLED FIREMAN. 

Mr. Webster of Ward 3 offered an order— That 
there be allowed and paid to Charles Furlong, a 
member of Hose Company No. 2, Boston Fire 
Department, the sum of $200, on account of in- 
juries received by him at a fire in the Charlestown 
District, Jan. 31, 1878; said sum to be charged to 
the appropriation for the Fire Department. Re- 
ferred, on motion of Mr. Webster, to the Joint 
Committee on Fire Department. Sent up. 

MANAGEMENT OF THE PUBLIC GROUNDS. 

Mr. Sibley of Ward 5 offered the following: 
An Ordinance Relative to the Common and Pub- 
lic Grounds. 

Be it ordained by the Aldermen and Common 
Council of the city of Boston, in City Council as- 
sembled, as follows: 

Section 1. Every power and authority now con- 
ferred by ordinance upon the Committee on the 
Common* and Public Grounds shall hereafter be 
exercised by the Board of Park Commissioners, 
and said board may employ such assistants and 
laborers as may from time to time be required to 
carry out the powers hereby granted; provided, 
however, that no money shall be expended by 
said board unless it shall have been first appro- 
priated by the City Council. 

Sect. 2. The third and fourth sections of the or- 
dinance relating to parks are hereby repealed, 
and the office of Superintendent of the Common 
and Public Grounds is hereby abolished. 

The question was upon giviug the ordinance a 
secoud reading. 

Mr. McGaragle of Ward 8—1 ask the ruling of 
the Chair if that Ordinance is properly before the 
Council, this subject matter having been already 
before the City Council, decided in the negative, 
and a reconsideration refused. 

The President — The subject before the Council 
was for the Committee on Ordinances to consider 
the expediency of transfering the care and man- v 
agement of tbe Public Grounds to the Park Com- 
missioners. Tbis comes up in auother form, and 
the Chair thicks it is in order. 

Mr. McGaragle— I shall have to appeal from the 
decision of the Chair on that, and I beg leave to 
call the attention of the Council to page 892 of 
Cushing's "Law and Practice of Legislative Bod- 
ies" : 

"It is a rule of parliamentary practice, which 
has already been generally considered, that no 
question or motion can regularly be offered, upon 
which tbe judgment of the House has been ex- 
pressed during the current session. This rule is 
essential, in order to avoid contradictory deci- 
sions, to prevent surprise, and to afford proper 
opportunity for determining questions as they 
severally arise." 

Also on page 893, referring to the same— 



108 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



'•Neither does it require the pendency of a bill 
in order that the judgment of the House may be 
expressed in such a manner as to preclude the in- 
troduction of the subject a second time; a judg- 
ment of the House upon a motion for a bill being 
equally effectual to preclude the introduction of a 
bill as a judgment upon the bill itself." 

And on page 8'J4 of the same author — 

"When a bill is already pending, and a motion 
Is made for leave to introduce a similar bill, the 
Question to be determined is, whether, if a motion 
should be adopted, it would authorize the intro- 
duction of a bill substantially the same with that 
already pending; if it would, then the motion is 
contrary to the rule." 

But tlie point 1 wish to make is on page 896, m 
a marginal note: 

"The rule, when stated broadly and fully, may 
be thus expressed, namely: that when the House 
has already done a particular thing, that thing can 
neither be undone nor otherwise done; and that 
when the House has refused to do a particular 
thing, that thing cannot be done." 

Now, sir, that order and this ordinance are in 
substance the same exactly, and whereas there 
may be a distinction, theie is no practical differ- 
ence. The order contemplated that the Commit- 
tee on Ordinances should frame an ordinance to 
place this department in charge of the Park Com- 
missioners. Now, sir, this is the same identical 
order, except that it is in the form of an ordi- 
nance giving the Park Commissioners the author- 
ity that we have already refused the Committee 
ml Ordinances the power to frame an ordinance 
for. 

Mr. Thompson of Ward 9—1 would like to ask 
the gentleman a question. There is upon our 
table among unfinished bnsidesa a motion to re- 
fer to the Committee on Bathing an order to con- 
sider the expediency of placing the Bathing De- 
partment in charge of the Hoard of Health. That 
order came down, and the question was whether 
it should he referred to the Committee on Ordi- 
nances. The Council refused to refer it to the 
Committee on Ordinances, and afterwards the 
question came up of referring it to the Committee 
mi Health, and that is still pending. Is that out 
of order ? 

Mr. McGaragle— I claim that it is not out of 
order, because the Council never passed upon it. 
It has been brought up as unfinished business. 
This is an entirely differeut matter. The Council 
have already passed upon this matter, and have 
negatived it. Now it is sought to introduce it in 
a different form by changing the order to an ordi- 
nance. 

Mr. Barnard of Ward ii4 — I raise the point of 
order that the appeal has not been seconded. 

The President— The point of order is well taken; 
the appeal has not been seconded. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward 10— I second the appeal. 

The President— The question is, Shall "the deci- 
sion of the Chair stand as the decision of the 
Council ? 

Mr. Crocker of Ward 9— It seems to me to be.plaiu 
that the gentleman reads from Cushing's book on 
parliamentary law what does n't meet the case. 
The question that the Council has decided is on 
the drawing up of the ordinance. Now there may 
be various reasons why the Council would not ask 
the committee to draw up the ordinance ; it may 



be that they don't want such an ordnance, and 
they may not think the Committee on¥)i finances 
competent to do it. It is entirely a different ques- 
tion. The question was whether the Committee 
on Ordinances should do it, and the various rea- 
sons which influenced the Council to act in that 
way may not influence them now. Now here is an 
ordinance before us for us to judge of its merits. 

Mr. MeGaragle— The gentleman from Ward !» 
has given us a distinction, and probably by fur- 
ther enlightening 08 he will show us a little of the 
difference. 

Mr. Danforth of Ward 10 — I wish to say that, 
hearing that the President of the Council was 
sick today, and might not be here, I inquired of 
the City Clerk, who is well posted on parliament- 
ary practice, and he me told me that this was en- 
tirely in form. 

Mr. Burke raised the point of order that the 
gentleman was not speaking on the appeal. 

The President— The Chair thinks the gentleman 
was discussing the subject of the appeal. The 
original order which came before the Council was 
to direct the Committee on Ordinances to consider 
the expediency of reporting an ordinance trans- 
ferring the public grounds to the Park Commis- 
sioners. 

Mr. McGaraele— I think you are in error there. 
1 think it was an imperative order for them to 
frame such an ordinance. 

The President read the original order,— which 
was, That the Committee on Ordinances he re- 
quested to report an ordinance transferring, 
etc.. — and added, "It now comes before us in the 
shape of an ordinance, and the Chair thinks it Is 
in order The question is upon the appeal." 

Mi.Brawley oi ward 19— The question being 
upon the appeal, nothing has been shown why we 
should not sustain the decision of the President. 

The question was put, and the decision of the 
President was sustained. 

The question came on giving the ordinance a 
second reading. 

Mr. Sawyer of Ward 2i moved that the subject 
be specially assigned to next Thursday evening at 
eight o'clock. 

Declared carried. 

Mi. McGaragle of Ward 8 doubted the vote, and 
on his motion the yeas and nays were ordered. 

The motion to assign prevailed— yeas 42, nays 
21: 

Yeas — Messrs. Barnard, Brown, Clapp, Coe, 
Colby, Crocker, Danforth, Day, Ham, Hill, Hollis, 
Howlaod) Kendricken, Kidney. Mcliahey, Mc- 
Geough, Mowry, Pearl, Perham, Plimpton, J. B. 
Richardson, M*. W. Richardson. Roach. Rn<t. E. 
H. Sampson, (). H. Sampson, Santry, H. N. Saw- 
yer, N. Sawyer, Shepard, Sibley, Smith. J. F. 
Taylor, J. Taylor, Thompson, Thorndike, Toppan, 
Ward, Whicher. Wilson, Wolcott, Wyman— 42. 

Nays— Messrs. Barry, Brawley, B. Brintnall, N. 
Y. Brintnall, Burke, Cannon, ("ox. Doherty, Dry- 
nan, Fernald, Flynn, Kellev, Lauten, Lovering, 
McDonald, McGaragle, Muilane, Mullen, O'Con- 
nor, Rosnosky, Spenceley— 21. 

Absent or not voting —Messrs. Denny, Devlin, 
Hibbard, Nason, Pierce, Roberts. Webster, Wool- 
ley— 8. 

Adjourned, on motion of Mr. Spenceley of Ward 
19. 



109 



BOARD OF ALDKRMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

MARCH 11, 187H. 



Regular meeting at four o'clock P. M., Alder- 
man Stebbins, Chairman, presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Four grand and two petit jurors were drawn for 
the March term of the I'nited States District 
Court. 

EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS. 

Special Police Officers — James H. Harlow, 
George A. Maun, John S. Gray. Continued. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark— Robert Hale, 
Alfred A. Hall, Randall G. Morse, J. B. L. Bart- 
lett, Frederic C. O'Brien, Morton Alden, William 
T. Osborn, Marshall H. Wells, Samuel L. Tuttle, 
William Seaver, Daniel E. Adams, Jonathan Fro- 
bock, Samuel Hosea, Jr., Alonzo H. Stowell, Salnia 
Kendall, James A. Cogswell, Thomas J. Eliott, 
Elbridge Walcott, John G. Abbott, Jr., Robert 
Seaver, John W. Wiggin, Frederic Seaver, Horace 
Lindall. Severally confirmed. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Bundle Hay— Israel 
M. Barnes, John A. Dyer, Edwin Y. Brown, 
Jairus L. Litchfield, Edward W. Harding, Wil- 
liam P. Boardman, William S. Holmes, Jasper H. 
Eaton, Charles E. Avery, William Lincoln. Sev- 
erally continued. 

Surveyors of Marble— William B. Bayley, Wil- 
liam H. Cary, Daniel Higgins. Confirmed. 

Inspectors of Petroleum, Earth Rock Oil and 
Other Products— Robert F. Means, Nathaniel 
Cleaves, Nathaniel P. Cleaves. Continued. 

Superintendents of Hay Scales— North, Henry 
A. Davis; South, Levi Chadbourne; South Boston, 
John M. Johnson; East Boston, John A. Brown ; 
Roxburv, Andrew W. Newman; Brighton, Benja- 
min F. Paine; West Roxbury, John J. Blake, 
Horace Lindall. Continued. 

Commissioner on West Boston and Cragie 
Bridges— Frederick W . Lincoln. Continued. 

HEAKINl, ON STEAM ENGINE. 

A hearing was had on the petition ot H. M. 
Richards & Co. for license to erect and use a 
steam engine at 14 Chardon street. No one ap- 
peared to object. Referred to Committee on 
Steam Engines. 

PETITIONS 11 EKE lilt ED. 

To the Committee on County Accounts. Nathan 
Morse and other members of the Suffolk Bar that 
indices be made to attachments of real estate in 
Registrvof Deeds lor Suffolk County. 

To the Committee on Hewers. Henry Dudl 
at., for a sewer in Green street, Ward 23, from 
Washington street to Stony Brook; William H. 
Allen, that the Winter-stree't sewer be deepened; 
Patrick Meehan et at., for a sewer in Green street 
and Union avenue. 

To the Committee on Common, etc. Glcudon 
Company et ul., that Prescott square be laid out 
as a public park and be fenced in; Charles II 
Parker et al., that the lot of land bounded by 
Huntington avenue, Dartmouth street and Boyls- 
ton street be laid out as a public square. 

To the Committee on Health on the part of 
the Board. Petitions tor leave to occupy stables 
as follows: James Fagan, two brick stables for 
six horses each, on Warwick street, rear 90 to 96 
Hammond street; A. Shurtlell, M. 1>., new wood- 
en, five horses, on private street from Medford 
street; Martin Hayes, old wooden, one horse, in 
rear of 132 Essex street; William Lovell, new 
• wooden, four horses, Lincoln street, Ward 25; 
Samuel Cushing, new brick, twelve horses, 11 and 
13 Mechanic street; Martha Bartlett, two new 
wooden, four horses each, in rear Green street; 
Michael Slyne, new wooden, two horses, Bolton 
street; John Dequau, new wooden, one cow and 
one horse, Lincoln street, Ward 25; John Mclune- 
ry, old wooden, two horses, North Mead street. 

To the Committee on Paving. John Bainard, 
that Faxon street be put in order; Elbridge 
Torrev et at., that Washington street, Ward 24, 
between Melville avenue and Centre street, be 
graded and put in order; Henry Dudley et al., for 
curbstones, gutters and sidewalks on Green 
street, between Washington street and Provi- 
dence Railroad crossing, West Roxbury; Aaron 
D. Williams et al., that Island street be graded, 
etc.; Malachi Clark, for leave to sprinkle 



certain streets during the coming season : 
Hiram Simmons et at., for edgestones and 
brick sidewalk on St. James avenue; 
Glendon' Company el al., that Prescott 
and Eagle streets be graded from Trenton to Put- 
nam street, and edgestones set; Samuel N. 
Brown, Jr., et at., that Huntington avenue, from 
Dartmouth street to the bridge, be completed by 
setting edgestones, laying sidewalks, planting 
trees and sodding such parts as are proposed. 

Petitions for leave to move three wooden build- 
ings, by William R. Cavanagh, from 229, 225 and 
227 West Second street to B street, near West 
Third street; Matthew M. Hackett et al., that 
North Harvard and Franklin streets, Ward 25, be 
put in order. 

To the Committee on Lamps. J. S. Bibrim et 
al., for additional street lamps on Russell street, 
Charlestown. 

To the Committee on Claims. William fecollan, 
to be paid for loss of a horse and damage to his 
vehicle on Fairfield street. 

To the Joint Com mitiee on Survey and Inspec- 
tion of UuUdings. Robert S. Frampton, for leave 
to enlarge a wooden building onNeponset avenue; 
Fitchburg Railroad Company, for leave to erect a 
wooden building for a giaiu elevator on Constitu- 
tion wharf. 

I NFINI8HED Bl SINESB. 

Order for abatement of au edgestoue assess- 
ment upon estate of Lawrence Norton, on Boyls- 
ton avenue, and for re-assessment of same on 
Lawrence Kelly. Passed. 

Order to give the name of "Holdeu Row" to a 
new street leading from Wesley street, Charles- 
town. Passed. 

Order to allow Sawyer, Hollis & Co. to set tele- 
graph poles ou Weston avenue and Market street, 
Brighton, on certain conditions. Passed. 

PAPERS l'ROM THE OOHMOD 001 MIL. 

Petitions were referred in concurrence. 

Order for Committee on Consolidation ol Duties 
performed by the Harbor Police and fire boats 
to give a public hearing on that measure. Passed 
in concurrence. 

Reierence of Auditor's Estimates for 1878-79 
(City Document No. 25) to the Committee on Fi- 
nance, with such as the Board of Aldermen may 
join. The Board concurred, and Aldermen Karris, 
\ "iles, Blade, Whiton and Whidden were joined to 
the committee. 

ordinance to amend the ordinance in relation to 
public institutions by striking from section 4 (see 
Ordinances, page 478) the words "provided, how- 
ever, that the compensation of all persons em- 
ployed shall be subject to the control of the City 
Council." Referred to the Committee on Ordi- 
nances in concurrence. 

Order to pay Charles Furlong S200, for injuries 
received at the recent tire in Charlestown. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on the Fire Department 
in concurrence. 

Order for City Solicitor's opinion on the power 
ot the city to contribute towards the expense of 
removing the scholars from the Tennyson-street 
Schoolhouse in order to grant the petition of the 
Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association 
for accommodations tor their exhibit. Passed in 
concurrence. 

Order to pay Hall & Whipple #2.30 for refresh- 
ments for Committee on Licenses of 1877. Passed 
in concurrence. 

Order to pay the following bills: Heliotype 
Printing Company, for map of procession, Sept. 
17, and circular, $115.88; F. L. Gilman & Co., bal- 
ance due on two historic monuments. $60.00; 
George J. Coyle, loam at monument in Boston 
Highlands, 134.50. Passed in concurrence. 

Auditor's Monthly Exhibit (City Doc. 26), show- 
ing the condition of the several appropriations on 
March 1, 1878. Placed on tile. 

I AST B08TOS KERRY AYENI BS. 

Report of Board of Street Commissioners on 
subject of laying out as highways certain avenues 
leading to the ferry slips; also the order request- 
ing said commissioners to lay out said avenues as 
proposed, came up from the other branch for con- 
currence in the passage of the same. 

Alderman Harris— The Board will observe that 
the commissioners abstain from making any rec- 
ommendations in regard to the expediency of lay- 
ing out the streets. I have had but little time to 
investigate the matter in order that I might be 
satisfied as to the proper course to take. My own 
idea is that the matter had better be deferred, 
because, as it is now, by instructing the Street 
Commissioners to lay out these streets we abso- 



MARCH 11 



1 8 7 8 . 



HO 



lutely ignore some million dollars' worth of prop- 
erty which they have cost. Now it is possible that 
at some subsequent period it may be expedient to 
change these terry landings. I Jcnow the matter 
has been considered and thought over, and as I 
before remarked the commissioners have ab- 
stained from making any recommendation, and 
thereby the whole responsibility is thrown upon 
us. In order that we may obtain farther informa- 
tion in regard to the matter 1 ask that the whole 
subject be laid upon the table. 
The order was laid on the table. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

A certificate was received from the other branch 
of the election of certain Second Assistant Asses- 
sors, as follows: 

Ward 6— Michael D. Collins in place of James 
L. Quigley. 

Ward 7— Edward J. Riley in place of Samuel B. 
Krogman. 

Ward 17 — Christopher C. Ryder in place of Dud- 
ley R. Child, resigned. 

Ward 19— Francis E. Hiues in place of Joshua 
Dyer. 

A ballot was ordered. Committee— Aldermen 
Faunce and Hayden. 

Alderman Whidclen — Before the vote is taken 
I wish to state that Mr. Child is not a candidate. 
He has withdrawn his name for that position from 
Ward 17. 

The ballot was taken, with the following re- 
sult: 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary for a choice 6 

Ward 6. 

Michael D. Collins 4 

"James L. Quigley 7 

Ward 7. 

Edward J. Eiley 3 

*Samuel 15. Krogman 8 

Ward 17. 

■[Christopher C. Ryder .'. 10 

Dudley R. Child 1 

Ward 19. 

tFrancis E. Hines 9 

Joshua Dyer 2 

* Elected in non-concurrence, 
t Elected in concurrence. 

FIRES AND ALARMS FOR FEBRUARY. 

The monthly report of the Fire Commissioners, 
giving the locations and the number of fires and 
alarms during the month of February, was re- 
ceived. Sent down. 

THE JURY LIST. 

A communication was received from the Board 
of Registrars of Voters transmitting a list of the 
jurors qualified to serve in the County of Suffolk 
which had been compiled by said Board in accord- 
ance with ihe provision of chapter 207 of the acts 
of 1876, and which had been posted for more than 
ten days in the Court House and City Hall. It was 
transmitted to the Board of Aldermen for their 
revision and acceptance. The list was laid over 
for one week. 

PETITION FOR STEAM ENGINE. 

A petition was received from George F. 
Meacham, for leave to erect and use a stationary 
engine in building corner of B and Second streets, 
South Boston, and an order of notice was passed 
for a hearing thereon on Monday, April 1, at four 
o'clock P. M. 

THE PRICE OF GAS. 

Alderman Hayden submitted a report on the pe- 
tition of Michael F. Lynch et «/.,tbat the city 
take steps to reduce the price charged for gas by 
the gas companies— That the City Government, 
having no power, by legislation or otherwise, to 
control the price of illuminating gas to consumers 
made by the several companies, can offer no rem- 
edy for the grievances complained of, and there- 
fore recommend that the petitioners have leave to 
withdraw. Accepted. 

LICENSES. 

Alderman Guild submitted reports from the 
Committee on Licenses, as follows: 

Minors' Applications Granted — Twenty-two 
newsboys. 

Auctioneers Licensed — Tileston C. Power, 15 
School street; T. S. G. Robinson, 92 Main street; 
John B. Dearborn, to act solely in connection 
with sheriffs' sales. 

Wagon Licenses Granted— Edwin A. Blake, 502 
Trem'ont street; Patrick J. Cogan, 1080 Tremont 
street; John J. Callahan, to do the business of 
Hogg, Brown & Taylor. 



Junk Dealer Licensed— Timothy Derrick, 136 
Ninth street. 

Intelligence Office Licensed— Julia R. "Wood, 89 
Court street. 

Hack Licenses Granted— John C. McDermott, 6 
Troy street; John McNamara, 35 Pemberton 
square; John T. Murray, Holyoke street, at Hotel 
Berwick. 

Hack License Refused— John Quinn, 209 Federal 
street. 

Severally accepted. 

ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman Hayden submitted a report from the 
Committee on Assessors' Department of leave to 
withdraw on the petition of Charles F. Shimmin 
and Albert G. Van Zandt to be refunded a half 
part of a certain tax paid as trustees of the will of 
Peter Parker. Accepted. Sent down. 

IMPROVEMENT OF THE BACK BAY PARK. 

Alderman Guild submitted the following: 

The Committee on Parks, who were requested 
to ascertain and report why the work of filling 
the Back Bay Park, as authorized by the City 
Council, has not been commenced, beg leave to 
submit the following report: Since the passage 
of the order appropriating the sum of $25,000 for 
tilling a portion of the park, your committee have 
been unremitting in their endeavors to have the 
work promptly commenced. When the order of 
inquiry reached the committee, they immediately 
sent to the Park Commissioners requesting in- 
formation on the subject, and received the follow- 
ing reply: 

Park Department, March 8, 1878. 

Curtis Guild, Msq., Chairman of I he Committee 
on Parks : Dear Sir— In reply to your communica- 
tion Of the 7th tilt., requesting information con- 
cerning the reason why the filling on Back Bay 
Park has not been begun, I beg to say that the 
city has not yet come into possession of the three 
parcels of land known as the Huntington, Parker 
Hill and Longwood entrances, and therefore the 
commissioners cannot enter upon the same with- 
out committing trespass. Arrangements were 
made with the Health Department by which a 
portion of Parker street was widened without 
cost to this department, to enable cars to reach 
Westland entrance. This is not believed to be a 
favorable point for the work contemplated by the 
order, but as it is the only one immediate- 
ly available, and perhaps would do some good in 
the direction desired by the City Council, the 
commissioners arranged" accordingly, a notice of 
which has been printed in the newspapers, a copy 
of which accompanies this. I beg to remind you 
that this department has no authority in regard 
to examining or passing upon titles to land for 
the purchase of which they have negotiated, and 
can only proceed upon the lands after the deeds 
are taken by the city. I take this opportunity to 
say that the examination of titles to lands pur- 
chased by the commissioners on Back Bay should 
be completed at as early a day as possible. 
Yours truly, 

Charles H. Dalton. 

Upon receiving this communication, your com- 
mittee inquired the cause of the delay in examin- 
ing the titles, and were informed that the work 
had been found to be much greater than was an- 
ticipated, involving an examination into water 
rights, and questions of law and fact, which were 
not known to be necessary when the order to pur- 
chase the land was passed. The person who has 
charge of the examination of the titles has pro- 
ceeded as fast as possible with the work, and has 
completed the examination of the titles to the 
Longwood entrance. It will take a short time to 
prepare the aeeds and convey this land to the 
city, and the work of filling at this point can be 
commenced. The work of filling the Westland 
entrance, mentioned in the above letter ironi the 
Park Commissioners, was commenced today. 
For the committee. 

Cirtis Guild, Chairman. 

Alderman Guild— The report says that immedi- 
ately on receiving this order of inquiry the com- 
mittee addressed a letter to the chairman of the 
Park Commissioners. 1 only desire to reiterate 
what I expressed at the last meeting of the Board, 
that the committee had repeated interviews with 
the Park Commissioners, and had received in- 
formation very nearly to the same effect of that 
which has been rehearsed to you. But we thought 
it best to present this information officially to the 
City Council. I also wish to sav that the Park 



Ill 



BOA.RU of aldermen. 



Commissioners and the Committee on Parks have 
been using every exertion to forward this work. 
The report was accepted. Sent down. 

PROPOSED SALE OE ENGINE-HOISE LOT. 

Alderman Harris offered an order— That the 
Committee on Public Buildings be authorized to 
consider and report on the expediency ot dispos- 
ing of that portion of engine-house lot on Soley 
street, Charlestown District, not in use either for 
school or engine-house purposes. Read twice and 
passed. Sent down. 

SEWKK-. 

Alderman Viles, from the Committee on Sewers, 
reported an order for the construction ot a sewer 
in Winter street, between Washington street and 
Winter place. Read twice and passed. 

PROJECTING SIGN REFUSED. 

Alderman Viles submitted a report from the 
Committee on Police of leave to withdraw on pe- 
tition of A. E. Alden, tor leave to suspend a can- 
vas sign at 503 Washington street. Accepted. 

LA1SOK AT THE PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 

Alderman Viles submitted the following: 
The Board of Directors for Public Institutions 
have received a proposal from a reliable business 
firm in the city tor employment of about forty 
men in the manufacture of chain cables; but in 
order to secure a contract for this labor it will be 
necessary to erect a building suitable tor the 
business. Said building, to be of brick, with cor- 
rugated iron root, can be erected for the sum of 
§9000. The subject has received the favorable 
consideration ot a committee of the board, and at 
a meeting ot the board held on the 9th instant 
it was voted to request the City Council tor an 
appropriation of §9000 for this purpose. The 
board would suggest that this sum can be spared 
from the unexpended balance of this year's ap- 
propriation for pauper expenses, and respectfully 
request that a transfer ot this kind be made at as 
early a day as practicable. Respectfully, 

Saw kl Little, President. 
Alderman Viles— 1 would state that thi> con- 
tractor has had the work at the State prison for 
several years. On account of the prison being 
removed to Concord he is cut short ot labor. He 
has applied to the Directors for Public Institu- 
tions to see if anything can be done at South Bos- 
ton. The directors chose a sub-committee who 
have been through it thoroughly. They find that 
they can make a contract with those parties for 
three years and employ forty or fifty laborers 
there, and they came to the conclusion that it is 
the best thing for the city to do. We can pay for 
the cost of the building the first year, and after 
that it will pay a handsome profit In the usual 
course this should go to the Committee on Public 
Institutions, bnt I will ask for its reference to the 
Committee on Finance in order to save time. 

Alderman Whidden— Is the Alderman correct is 
saying that the profits on the labor will pay S9000 
—the cost of the building— the first year? 

Alderman Viles— The sub-committee have so re 
ported. They have been into the matter verv 
thoroughly. This is for the manufacture of chain 
cables. There is no other party in the city who 
manufactures them. On account ot the removal 
of the prison to Concord the contractor is short 
of labor, as he does not wish to go there. 

Alderman Harris— I hope the communication 
will be referred to the Joint Committee on Public 
Institutions, for them to report upon the expe- 
diency of this measure. I want that committee to 
report exactly the profits in Hollars and cents. A 
mere verbal statement don't amount to a great 
deal with me. I am one of those who doubt 
whether the city can make money by going into 
the chain cable business. If it is referred to the 
committee, and they, Jafter due inquiry into the 
matter, recommenu that we avail ourselves of this. 
then I shall be ready to adopt it. I move that it 
be referred to the Committee on Public Institu- 
tions. 

Alderman Viles— I spoke to the Chairman of the 
Committee on Public Institutions and he has no 
objection to its going to the Committee on Fi- 
nance. The directors say it is the best thing to be 
done. I hope it will go to the Finance Committee 
in order to help the matter along. 

The communication was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Public Institutions by a division— C for, 
2 against. Sent down. 

THE PROPOSED NEW COURT HOI - 

Alderman Slade submitted the following: 
The Committee on County Building-, to whom 
was referred the accompanying City Document 



No. 22, being a message from his Honor the Mayor 
on subject of new Court House, respectlul- 
ly report as follows : Your committee are well 
aware that the public convenience requires a new 
Court House. The demand for such seems to be 
imperative, the city having outgrown its present 
accommodations. This demand has not sudden- 
ly come upon us, but has been increas- 
ing year by year with the growth of 
the city. The great difficulty thus far has been 
in the selection of a suitable site and the cost of 
the building. His Honor the Mayor suggests in 
his message the selection of the reservoir site, so 
called, at th rear of the State House, togetter 
with the estates bounded by Hancock, Mt. Ver- 
non, Derne and Temple streets. The valuation of 
this lot, as given, exclusive of the reservoir lot, 
is $214,000. The City Architect has given us as 
judgment that a Court House erected on this 
lot would cost §1,200,000; add to this the value of 
the land taken, and you have a building costing 
$1,414,000. 

It has been suggested in favor of the 
present site that the granite blocks of which 
the reservoir is constructed might be used 
in building the foundations and basement story 
of the new building, thereby decreasing the cost. 
Your commntee have given them as the opinion 
of prominent builders and mechanics that noth- 
ing would be gained in this direction, as the cost 
of removing, recutting and replacing this stone 
would be as much, if not more, than new would 
cost delivered on the site. 

As to the merits of this site over others named 
for a new Court House, there seems to be 
a strong difference of opinion; be that as 
it may, vour committee do not feel like recoin- 
mendi'nir the erection of a building on the site in 
the present financial depression, that will involve 
the city to so large an amount. 

As previously stated, your committee are weH 
aware of the necessity that exists for a new Court 
House, and they would suggest another plan cost- 
ing much less than that proposed. That is the 
plan proposed in 1875 during the administration 
of Mayor Cobb, namelv, the erection of a new 
Court House on Charles* street next the county jail 
for all the criminal business in connection with the 
courts, (thereby saving a heavy cost in the trans- 
portation of prisoners to and from the jail, and 
the removal of much that is offensive from the 
public gaze,) and the building of a new Court 
House on the present site for the transaction of 
the civil business. 

By the erection of these two buildings it is be- 
lived that provision will be made in the county 
tor court purposes for fifty years to come. 

At the time this plan was proposed the City 
Architect had olans prepared covering the 
erection of these two buildings, that tor 
the civil business being provided with 
elevators, and giving ample light and venti- 
lation for all the rooms. In addition to providing 
for the wants of the county, there will remain not 
in use eighteen rooms, that could De used in con- 
nection with City Hall by the building of a bridge. 
This plan is on exhibition at the City Hall, in 
the Aldermen's room, at the present time. 

The cost of building these two court houses we 
estimate at $500,000, being less by S900.000 than 
that proposed for the reservoir lot. 

Your committee consider that the public con- 
venience requires a central location; fot that rea- 
son they also favor the building of the present 
Court House. 

As a measure of economy their plan is favora- 
ble. 

Without going more into detail with regard to 
their plan lor these buildings, they would simply 
recommend its lavorable consideration by the 
City Council, believing it to be both practicable 
and economical. Ll CIOS Slade. 

Thos. ,1. W HIDDEN. 
Chas. R. McLean. 
The report was accepted. 

PAVING REPORTS AND ORDERS. 

Alderman Whidden submitted the following 
from the Committee on Paving : 

Report that leave be granted Timothy Ahem to 
move a wooden buildins from South street, Ward 
23, to Keys street, opposite Call street. Accepted. 

Report that Patrick Grace have leave to sprinkle 
certain streets in Brighton, on the usual condi- 
tions. Accepted. 

Report of leave to withdraw on petition of Cook 
& Handy to be allowed compensation from the 



MARCH 11. 1878 



113 



city for sprinkling a portion of Dudley street in 
1877. Accepted. 

Ordered, That from the assessment laid upon 
Norman Y. Brintnall for sidewalk furnished on 
Miller street, there be abated the sum of $2.70 tor 
an error in measurement. Read twice and 
passed. 

THE PROPOSED LOAN FOB IMPROVING THE PARKS. 

Alderman McLean offered an order— That the 
Committee on Legislative Matters be directed to 
oppose, on behalf of the City Council, the bill 
now before the Legislature, which authorizes the 
city of Boston to create a debt for the proposed 
public park. 

The Chairman stated that the order would lie 
over under the rule. 

Alderman McLean— Perhaps the sense of the 
Board can be taken on that at this time as well as 
any other ; and as that measure is before the 
Legislature, perhaps if it is not passed upon today 
it may be of no use, and it may not be of any use 
any way. I have offered this order from the fact 
that 1 believe the proposed measure will be in 
contravention of the law already existing. In 1875 
the Legislature passed an act, section 12 of which 
says— 

"For the purpose of defraying the expenses in- 
curred under the provisions of this act, the City 
Council of Boston shall have authority to issue 
from time to time, and to an amount not exceed- 
ing the amount actually expended for the pur- 
chase or taking of land for said parks, bonds or 
certificates of debt," etc., etc. 

That is to say, for the purpose of taking land, 
and not improvement; and it was distinctly un- 
derstood that the appropriations for the improve- 
ment of this park should be put into the tax levy 
year by year. Now, sir, it is evident from the 
Auditor's monthly exhibit that there is nothing 
wanted for the purchase of any lands for 
parks, there now being some $214,448 unexpended 
of the appropriation for taking lands for public 
parks. There is no want of any money iD that di- 
rection. This act was passed in 1875 and was sub- 
mitted to the people. The people voted upon this 
act favorably, perhaps we have a right to believe, 
for the reason that these bonds were noc to be is- 
sued to an unlimited extent; that is, they were to 
be spent simply in the taking of land, and that 
any expenditures for the purposes of improve- 
ment were to be put into the tax levy y'car by 
year. Now, sir, if this act passes, the City Council 
will not be called upon to go to the people to get 
their assent; but it will be left with the City 
Council, perhaps, to be log-rolled, and pushed into 
an expenditure that the times will not warrant. 
While I am prepared at this time to say that I am 
willing to put into the appropriation bill this year 
any sum that will be reasonable for the im- 
provement of parks, I am not prepared to con- 
sent that large debts shall be created and 
left for the payment of those who come after 
us. I believe that they will have enough to do to 
take care of themselves. I believe it will not be 
honest to them or to our creditors for us to run in 
debt beyond our capacity to pay, and that we 
should pay as we go. I hope the Board of Alder- 
men will remonstrate against the passage of this 
act,which will allow bonds to be created in the in- 
terest of those who have perhaps private inter- 
ests of their own to serve. Without saying more, 
I hope we shall live by the law we have, without 
any new laws being passed in contravention of 
that law. I ask for the suspension of the rule, 
that it may be acted upon at this time. 

Alderman Guild— I hope the Alderman wont 
press that. He knows, sir, that we are not pre- 
pared for it. Gentlemen in favor or opposed ex- 
pected no such order to come up, and I don't 
believe in rushing a thing of such importance 
through without any chance to examine into 
the matter. I am opposed to the Alderman, but I 
have not the authorities at hand with which to 
frame a reply. Before 1 discharge my artillery I 
want the powder in hand. I might say something 
about the importance of parks and might make a 
pretty speech. Neither the Alderman nor myself 
will enjoy the parks we build. It may be that my 
grandchildren will enjoy them, and I am willing 
my grandchildren should help pay for tbem. As 
regards the legislators at the State House being- 
very eager to grant the city of Boston an opportu- 
nity to run in debt, and to go to an unlimited ex- 
pense for parks, my experience has been very 
much to the contrary. The legislators at the State 
House, and especially those who come from dis- 
tricts somewhat removed from Boston, are very 



chary about giving Boston any privileges, even 
though it be the privilege of running into debt. 
They are more careful of our interests often than 
of their own. I should most decidedly object to 
having the question taken tonight, and I hope it 
will lie over under the rule, in order that we may 
look at it fairly and squarely, and that we may 
study into both sides of the question. 

Alderman McLean— It perhaps may seem to be 
discourteous not to accede to the gentleman's re- 
quest; but the gentleman may not know that this 
matter has been through thi- House and is still in 
the Senate. It seems to me that if this Board is 
to do anything, we should act now while we h»ve 
the power to do something. They can instruct 
the committee to request the Senate, or such 
branch of the Legislature as it is before, to with- 
hold action upon this matter until we have an- 
otner meeting; and if that is done, I am willing 
that it should lie over. But if it is to go through 
without any further action in that direction, of 
course if we are to do anything it should be done 
now. 

Alderman Guild— The Alderman knew all about 
this since he has been a member of the Board of 
Aldermen, and why did n't he bring it in before? 
He says it has gone through the House of Repre- 
sentatives; why did n't he speak of it before it 
went through? This may be an effort on the part 
of those individuals who are determined that 
there shall be no public parks for the people of 
Boston. There is no disguising the fact; they op- 
pose it at every step. I look at it in that direc- 
tion; I may be wrong. I will be charitable 
enough to say that the Alderman does not 
want the city of Boston to overstep the limit 
for contracting debt. And I am just as anx- 
ious about that as he is. I have heard the opin- 
ion expressed by members of the Board of Alder- 
men that parks are a luxury, and that to vote any 
money for them is to vote for luxuries. I do not 
look upon parks as a luxury any more than I do a 
supply of pure water. They are a necessity. If 
the gentleman bad given this matter atten- 
tion, with the same vigor that he has tonight, he 
would have acted in time to oppose it in the House 
of Representatives, where it would be as easy to 
be defeated as it would be in the Senate. Certain 
gentlemen, in their own individual capacity, who 
are not prepared to debate it, may bring their 
argumentative forces to bear upon this question, 
but tonight 1 am not prepared to debate it. 

Alderman Faunce— Generally I agree with the 
Alderman in matters of this kind, but I am not 
prepared to vote for the order in this case, be- 
cause I do not understand it. I hope it will lie 
over. 

Alderman McLean — I do not want the chairman 
of the Committee on Parks to put me in a posi- 
tion that I don't desire to be put in. He will re- 
member that I stated that I was prepared to vote 
for a reasonable expenditure for the improvement 
of the public parks if it was put into the tax levy. 
If the Committee on Common and Squares 
will bring in such an amount as we can afford to 
pay for the improvement of parks he will have 
my support. But so far as providing for parks by 
a loan that those who come after us will have to 
pay for, I will say that I am opposed to it. He 
says he wants those who come after him to pay 
tor them; I'think they will have enough to pay 
for. I think we ought to be honest with those 
who come after us, and certainly if the public, 
debt is to be increased as fast as it has been, we 
will be more able to pay it than they will be in the 
future. Now, I don't wish to be misrepresented. 
So long as we have these public grounds I am in 
favor of having them improved so long as we can 
pay the bills; but I am not in favor of creating a 
debt to be paid by those who come after us. 

Alderman Guild— I will remind the Alderman 
that almost every public improvement has been